6

Designing an ASP.Net MVC application authorization using claim based model. Lets say that we have an object called - Product. Typically, there are 4 different actions - Create, Edit, Delete and View. Authorization is done using ClaimsAuthorize attribute.

[Authorize]
public class ProductController : Controller
{

     [ClaimsAuthorize("Product", "VIEW")]
     public List<Product> GetProducts()
     {
         // ....
     }

     [ClaimsAuthorize("Product", "CREATE")]
     public Product CreateNewProduct(Product product)
     {
         //....
     }
}

But in my case, I have to support different types of EDIT permissions:

  1. Some Users can Edit the product if the same user has created the Product originally

  2. Some users can Edit the product if the Product belongs to a specific category and the user also has access to the same category

  3. Some users can Edit all the products (this is the normal Product Edit operation)

How do you elegantly authorize all these Edit operations (preferably attribute driven as shown above) and at the same time I want to keep the authorization code separate from the normal MVC controller code and business logic.

[Above code sample is not syntactically correct, I just made it up for the purpose of explaining this question] Let me know your thoughts.

1 Answer 1

5

For first part of your question, Claim based authorization, I have already answered it in this similar question. And I am not going to repeat here.

But for your another rules like products editable only by owner. You could write separate AuthorizeAttribute for each rule and apply them on your Actions consider this as an simple example:

using Microsoft.AspNet.Identity;
public class OwnerAuthorizeAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    private string _keyName;
    public bool IsPost { get; set; }

    public OwnerAuthorizeAttribute(string keyName)
    {
        _keyName = keyName;
    }

    protected override bool AuthorizeCore(HttpContextBase httpContext)
    {
        // imagine you have a service which could check owner of 
        // product based on userID and ProductID

        return httpContext.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated
            && this.ContainsKey
            && _productService.IsOwner(httpContext.User.Identity.GetUserId(),
                int.Parse(this.KeyValue.ToString()));
    }

    private bool ContainsKey
    {
        get
        {
            return IsPost
                ? HttpContext.Current.Request.Form.AllKeys.Contains(_keyName)
                // for simplicity I just check route data 
                // in real world you might need to check query string too 
                : ((MvcHandler)HttpContext.Current.Handler).RequestContext
                     .RouteData.Values.ContainsKey(_keyName);
        }
    }
    private object KeyValue
    {
        get
        {
            return IsPost
                ? HttpContext.Current.Request.Form[_keyName]
                // for simplicity I just check route data 
                // in real world you might need to check query string too 
                : ((MvcHandler)HttpContext.Current.Handler)
                    .RequestContext.RouteData.Values[_keyName];
        }
    }
}

You could repeat same pattern to your other rules too.

And you could simply apply your custom attributes to your actions:

[OwnerAuthorize("id")]
public ActionResult Edit(int id)
{
    // your code
}

[HttpPost]
// double checking in post back too 
[OwnerAuthorize("id", IsPost = true)]
public ActionResult Edit(Product product)
{
    // your code
}

It is obvious you could apply more then one AuthorizeAttribute to your actions. In this case all of them must return true.

[ClaimsAuthorize("Product", "EDIT")]
[OwnerAuthorize("id")]
[YetOtherAuthorize]
public ActionResult MyFancyAction(int id)
{
}
6
  • Thanks Sam. Good answer.
    – Andy T
    Aug 6, 2015 at 13:58
  • This is not for MVC 6 is it?
    – user20358
    Dec 15, 2015 at 15:48
  • @user20358 no this is for Identity 2 and MVC 5, But principle is same you could use this approach by some small tweaks in Identity 3 and MVC 6 Dec 15, 2015 at 18:31
  • What about _productService in OwnerAuthorizeAttribute class ? Is it initialized via some property of OwnerAuthorizeAttribute ?
    – Pavel
    May 31, 2016 at 6:40
  • 1
    🙌🙌🙌🙌🙌🙌🙌🙌 This answer is great.
    – user4573148
    May 2, 2017 at 17:32

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