77

I have the following piece of code:

private String toString(List<DrugStrength> aDrugStrengthList) {
    StringBuilder str = new StringBuilder();
        for (DrugStrength aDrugStrength : aDrugStrengthList) {
            if (!aDrugStrength.isValidDrugDescription()) {
                aDrugStrengthList.remove(aDrugStrength);
            }
        }
        str.append(aDrugStrengthList);
        if (str.indexOf("]") != -1) {
            str.insert(str.lastIndexOf("]"), "\n          " );
        }
    return str.toString();
}

When I try to run it, I get ConcurrentModificationException, can anyone explain why it happens, even if the code is running in same thread? And how could I avoid it?

marked as duplicate by George Stocker Nov 19 '14 at 0:57

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 4
  • 1
    An explanation of this exception is that the iterator of the ArrayList is a fail-fast iterator; i.e. it will fail (throw exception) when it detects that its collection in the mean-time has been modified. In comparison to fail-safe iterators which don't throw concurrent modification exceptions (e.g. on collections ConcurrentHashMap and CopyOnWriteArrayList) – Mike Argyriou May 28 '14 at 12:05
152

You can't remove from list if you're browsing it with "for each" loop. You can use Iterator. Replace:

for (DrugStrength aDrugStrength : aDrugStrengthList) {
    if (!aDrugStrength.isValidDrugDescription()) {
        aDrugStrengthList.remove(aDrugStrength);
    }
}

With:

for (Iterator<DrugStrength> it = aDrugStrengthList.iterator(); it.hasNext(); ) {
    DrugStrength aDrugStrength = it.next();
    if (!aDrugStrength.isValidDrugDescription()) {
        it.remove();
    }
}
  • the foreach syntax of java actually use Iterator, some IDE will report this solution and propose to replace with the foreach (for(MyListener listener : MyListenerList)) – Hugo Gresse Dec 29 '14 at 9:42
  • @HugoGresse Yes, but this is the opposite direction. Iterator exposes remove that is safe for its iteration, something that foreach "loses". – Konrad Garus Dec 30 '14 at 21:52
  • 2
    didn't knew that thank you @KonradGarus – Hugo Gresse Dec 31 '14 at 8:08
  • very interesting, thank you – kuldeep Jul 20 '15 at 12:42
24

Like the other answers say, you can't remove an item from a collection you're iterating over. You can get around this by explicitly using an Iterator and removing the item there.

Iterator<Item> iter = list.iterator();
while(iter.hasNext()) {
  Item blah = iter.next();
  if(...) {
    iter.remove(); // Removes the 'current' item
  }
}
14

I like a reverse order for loop such as:

int size = list.size();
for (int i = size - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
    if(remove){
        list.remove(i);
    }
}

because it doesn't require learning any new data structures or classes.

  • WOW THANK YOU. I didn't know this trick. – Adam Varhegyi Jan 30 '18 at 14:40
7

there should has a concurrent implemention of List interface supporting such operation.

try java.util.concurrent.CopyOnWriteArrayList.class

  • I had a same problem with HashMap, fixed with another implemention of Map interface. You should test it yourself.I don't know detail about CopyOnWriteArrayList – idiotgenius Jul 6 '10 at 13:35
5

While iterating through the loop, you are trying to change the List value in the remove() operation. This will result in ConcurrentModificationException.

Follow the below code, which will achieve what you want and yet will not throw any exceptions

private String toString(List aDrugStrengthList) {
        StringBuilder str = new StringBuilder();
    List removalList = new ArrayList();
    for (DrugStrength aDrugStrength : aDrugStrengthList) {
        if (!aDrugStrength.isValidDrugDescription()) {
            removalList.add(aDrugStrength);
        }
    }
    aDrugStrengthList.removeAll(removalList);
    str.append(aDrugStrengthList);
    if (str.indexOf("]") != -1) {
        str.insert(str.lastIndexOf("]"), "\n          " );
    }
    return str.toString();
}
  • Why the downvote ? – bragboy Jul 6 '10 at 9:20
  • 2
    aDrugStrengthList.removeAll(removalList) – Tim Bender Jul 6 '10 at 9:25
  • @TimBender - thank you edited the answer. – bragboy Mar 7 '16 at 14:51
2

We can use concurrent collection classes to avoid ConcurrentModificationException while iterating over a collection, for example CopyOnWriteArrayList instead of ArrayList.

Check this post for ConcurrentHashMap

http://www.journaldev.com/122/hashmap-vs-concurrenthashmap-%E2%80%93-example-and-exploring-iterator

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