3

I need to write a java program that tells you if the parenthesis are balanced in a string, I can't find the correct way to do it though. I already know I am going to use a loop to count the open and closed parenthesis "(" = 1 and ")" = -1 stored in an integer that would come back as 0 or anything else.

I just don't know how to count the parenthesis that way.

Edit: To be clearer, all i really need is a way to count the parentheses and i am blocked because i can't work with something like :

if (args[i] == '(') //the interpreter will not let me compare strings with chars count++;

Edit 2 :

public class Testing_grounds {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String str = args[];
        char RetV[] = str.toCharArray();
        int counter = 0;
        for (int n = 0; n <= RetV.length; n++) {
            if (RetV[n] == '(')
                counter++;
            else if (RetV[n] == ')')
                counter--;
        }
        if (counter == 0)
            System.out.println("The parentheses are balenced!");
        else if(counter < 0)
            System.out.println("There are to many closed parenthesis!");
        else if(counter > 0)
            System.out.println("There are to many opened parenthesis!");
    }
}

This is pretty much the code i'm going for (i'm trying to get the toCharArray() method to work but i keep getting class expected error on the 3rd line. That line is there because it won't let me do : args.toCharArray)

Remember that i need to do this with an input and not a string already present in the code.

3
  • 1
    Can you paste the program Aug 6, 2015 at 7:58
  • I think in addition you have to consider the order they appear; ))(( is wrong and ()() is Ok and both cases will return 0 Aug 6, 2015 at 7:58
  • Don't forget to skip over parentheses in quoted strings. That makes this problem difficult.
    – Bathsheba
    Aug 6, 2015 at 8:02

10 Answers 10

8

If you scan the string character by character, then you can do something like this:

int counter = 0;
for (int i=0; i<text_length; i++) {
    if (text[i] == '(') counter++;
    else if (text[i] == ')') counter--;

    if (counter < 0) break;
}

if (counter != 0) error();

This code takes into account the order of the parenthesis, so ")(" will be detected as an error.

EDIT:

To do the same in Java you can do:

int counter = 0;
for (char ch : text.toCharArray())
    if (ch == '(') counter++;
    else if (ch == ')') counter--;

    if (counter < 0) break;
}
if (counter != 0) error();

Hope it helps.

2
  • That is how i'm doing it but i don't know how to scan the string character by character.
    – Thierry L
    Aug 6, 2015 at 10:45
  • Ok, I edited the post to explain how to do it in Java.
    – castarco
    Aug 6, 2015 at 10:52
1

Read the string from start to finish, use a stack to count the parentheses. Push only the opening parentheses into the stack, pop one if you encounter a closing parenthesis.

So something like ((a+x)*(b+y)) would leave an empty stack at the end, which tells you the parentheses are balanced.

Do you also need to consider the order eg:(a+b)))((?

1
  • That seems to be a good idea but I have zet to learn how to use stacks And no, i onlz need to count them so things like ()( will simply output a predefined message saying there are to many opened parentheses.
    – Thierry L
    Aug 6, 2015 at 10:36
1

Actually you can do it in several ways:

1) use a stack. Push a value every time you see a ( and pop a value every time you see a ). If there's nothing to pop (stack exception) then it's not balanced. This approach is nice because if you use a stack of char you can easily extend it to handle other types of parenthesis by having a simple mapping of closing parenthesis to opening parenthesis (i.e. ] -> [, ) -> (, } -> {) and checking if what you popped is ok for what you encountered in the string.

Something like this:

Stack<Character> openParens = new Stack<>();
for(Character ch: text.toCharArray()) {
    if(ch == '(') {
        openParens.push(ch);
    } else if(ch == ')') {
        if(openParens.empty()) {
            return false; //unbalanced
        } else {
            openParens.pop();
        }
    }
}
return true;

This will not work if parenthesis order is not important, though.

2) use a counter, add 1 when you notice a ( and remove 1 when you see a ). If you go below 0 return false (unbalanced). Or go until the end of the string and then check if the count is 0, this will handle cases when you don't require ordering (just when the count of ( == ))

@EDIT:

Ok so the problem is String str = args[]; won't compile if you don't provide the index (i.e. String str = args[0];). Also you cannot call toCharArray() on args because that's a method defined on the String class and args is an array of Strings.

I would not recommend passing the text you want to count that way, it's not easy to use afterwards. How about instead you ass a test file name containing your text and read that instead?

3
  • The second method is what i tried to do but i keep encountering the same probleme : Error:(11, 24) java: incomparable types: java.lang.String and char
    – Thierry L
    Aug 6, 2015 at 10:38
  • @ThierryL could you please add your code to the question? Are you trying to compare like this ch == ")" where ch is a char? This won't work -> you need to use '. Aug 6, 2015 at 10:49
  • I put in the code i have at the moment, and i tried doing char== '(' but the problem is i would get the can't compare char and string so now i'm trying to use a toCharArray() method but i still get problems
    – Thierry L
    Aug 6, 2015 at 12:29
0

well, if you want to count the number of balanced parenthesis in a string, following java code might help

 int open=0,close=0;
    Stack<Character> openbrace = new Stack<Character>();

    for( char c : sample.toCharArray())
    {
        if(c=='(') {
            openbrace.push(c);
            open++;
            }
        else if(c==')') {
            if(openbrace.isEmpty()==false) {    openbrace.pop();}
            close++;
            }
    }

    if(open-close!=0)
        System.out.println("unbalanced ");
    else
        System.out.println("balanced");
    System.out.println(" count of balanced brace="+Math.min(open, close));
0

Function calculates the unbalanced brackets.

public static int bracketMatch(String bracketString) {   

    Stack<Character>opening = new Stack<Character>();
    Stack<Character>closing = new Stack<Character>();
    char [] brackets = bracketString.toCharArray();
    for (char bracket: brackets) {

        if (bracket == '(') {
            opening.push(bracket);
        } else if (bracket == ')') {
            if (opening.size() > 0) {
                opening.pop();
            }
            else {
                closing.push(bracket);
            }
        }
    }

    return  opening.size()+closing.size();
}
0

Here is the working code which returns the matching count and -1 when unmatched.

public int matchedCount(){
        Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
        Stack<Integer> stk = new Stack<Integer>();
        System.out.println("Enter expression");
        String exp = scan.next();        
        int len = exp.length();
        System.out.println("\nMatches and Mismatches:\n");
        int counter = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
        {    
            char ch = exp.charAt(i);
            if (ch == '(')
                stk.push(i);
            else if (ch == ')')
            {
                try
                {
                    int p = stk.pop() + 1;
                    counter++;
                }
                catch(Exception e)
                {
                    return -1;
                }
            }            
        }

        while (!stk.isEmpty() )
            return -1; 
        return counter;
    }
0
public class Practice {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        String str = "([{{[(())]}}";

        int OpenCurlyBracket = 0;
        int ClosedCurlyBracket = 0;
        int OpenSquareBracket = 0;
        int ClosedSquareBracket = 0;
        int OpenRoundBracket = 0;
        int ClosedRoundBracket = 0;
        int curlyBracketCount = 0;
        int roundBracketCount = 0;
        int squareBracketCount = 0;

        for (char ch: str.toCharArray()) {

            switch (ch) {
            case '{': OpenCurlyBracket ++;

            break;
            case '[': OpenSquareBracket++;

            break;
            case '(': OpenRoundBracket ++;

            break;
            case '}': ClosedCurlyBracket ++;

            break;
            case ']': ClosedSquareBracket ++;

            break;
            case ')': ClosedRoundBracket ++;

            default:
                break;
            }

        }
        if (OpenCurlyBracket == ClosedCurlyBracket) {
            int counta = (OpenCurlyBracket+ClosedCurlyBracket);
            System.out.println("Total Curly Bracket:"+counta);
            curlyBracketCount = counta/2;
        }else{
            int counta = (OpenCurlyBracket+ClosedCurlyBracket);
            System.out.println("Total Curly Bracket:"+counta);
            curlyBracketCount = counta/2;
        }
        if (OpenRoundBracket == ClosedRoundBracket) {
            int countb = (OpenRoundBracket+ClosedRoundBracket);
            System.out.println("Total Round Bracket:"+countb);
            roundBracketCount = countb/2;
        }else {

            int countb = (OpenRoundBracket+ClosedRoundBracket);
            System.out.println("Total Round Bracket:"+countb);
            roundBracketCount = countb/2;
        
        }
        
        if (OpenSquareBracket == ClosedSquareBracket) {
            int countc = (OpenSquareBracket+ClosedSquareBracket);
            System.out.println("Total Square Bracket:"+countc);
            squareBracketCount = countc/2;
        }else {

            int countc = (OpenSquareBracket+ClosedSquareBracket);
            System.out.println("Total Square Bracket:"+countc);
            squareBracketCount = countc/2;
        
        }

        System.out.println("");
        System.out.println("Valid Curly Bracket:"+curlyBracketCount+"\nValid Round Bracket:" +roundBracketCount+"\nValid Square Bracket:"+squareBracketCount);      

    }
}

OUTPUT:

Total Curly Bracket:4
Total Round Bracket:5
Total Square Bracket:3

Valid Curly Bracket:2
Valid Round Bracket:2
Valid Square Bracket:1
1
  • You should provide an explanation for that code, code-only answers are usually not recommended (unless the code is very self-explanatory and clear).
    – astroide
    Jun 19, 2021 at 2:02
0
    package com.company;

import java.util.Scanner;

public class Main {


    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.println("Enter string full of parenthesis : ");
        String input = sc.next();
        char s1 = '{';
        char s2 = '}';
        char s3 = '(';
        char s4 = ')';
        char s5 = '[';
        char s6 = ']';


        int c1=0;
        int c2=0;
        int c3 =0;
        int c4 = 0;
        int c5 =0;
        int c6= 0;
        for(int i=0; i<input.length(); i++)
        {
            if(input.charAt(i) == s1) {
                c1++;
            }

            if(input.charAt(i) == s2) {
                c2++;
            }
            if(input.charAt(i) == s3) {
                c3++;
            }

            if(input.charAt(i) == s4) {
                c4++;
            }

            if(input.charAt(i) == s5) {
                c5++;
            }

            if(input.charAt(i) == s6) {
                c6++;
            }
        }
        if( c1-c2 >= 0){
            System.out.println( s1 + " is unbalanced by :" + ( c1 - c2));
        }
        if( c2-c1 >= 0){
            System.out.println( s2 + " is unbalanced by :" + ( c2 - c1));
        }
        if( c3-c4 >= 0){
            System.out.println( s3 + " is unbalanced by :" + ( c3 - c4));
        }
        if( c4-c3 >= 0){
            System.out.println( s4 + " is unbalanced by :" + ( c4 - c3));
        }
        if( c5-c6 >= 0){
            System.out.println( s5 + " is unbalanced by :" + ( c5 - c6));
        }
        if( c6-c5 >= 0){
            System.out.println( s6 + " is unbalanced by :" + ( c6 - c5));
        }

//        System.out.println("The Character '"+search+"' appears "+count+" times.");
    }
    }
1
  • 1
    Please add further details to expand on your answer, such as working code or documentation citations.
    – Community Bot
    Aug 27, 2021 at 17:10
0

These are great answers, but I would really like a way to count that considers single and double quotes. Many times I have brackets or braces tucked away inside them and it throws off the count.

-1

You can take the difference using below code:

int diff = str.replaceAll("\\(", "").length() - str.replaceAll("\\)","").length();

if it is 0 then parenthesis are balanced.

3
  • why -1? any reason please Aug 6, 2015 at 8:09
  • @MateuszDymczyk you are correct, a)(a is not valid text but he wants to check whether ( and ) are equal in text or not. Aug 6, 2015 at 8:12
  • well I didn't down vote you but usually balanced parentheses means that the order also matters Aug 6, 2015 at 8:18

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