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We were recently having some problems with deadlocks in Posgres 9.4. Some queries were simply not returning and would just hang indefinitely. After some investigation we found that process deadlocking seemed to be the problem. When running the queries from the Lock Monitoring Postgres Wiki, we would see a whole bunch of blocked processes. The only way to resolve them was then to start killing some of those processes until Postgres could figure things out again.

Now my understanding was that the deadlock detector in Postgres should be able to figure out that there is a deadlock and then proceed to resolve it by rolling back one of the blocked transactions, so that the other one could proceed and then retrying the first one. But that is not what happened in our case, these processes where just deadlocked indefinitely until we killed them.

The deadlock_timeout was set to 1s (the default) and I could not find a flag to turn the deadlock detector on or off, so I assume it is always on.

So my question is whether the deadlock detector can only detect some types of deadlocks and if so, which ones?

And how come the queries shown on the Lock Monitoring Wiki can detect the deadlocked processes but the deadlock detector itself cannot?

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  • It would help if you'd actually show the output of your lock checking query – Craig Ringer Aug 6 '15 at 13:14
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Postgres will only spot a deadlock if it can see two transactions waiting on each other. In particular for two (or more) processes the scenario must be:

  • A needs to acquire a resource that is locked by B.
  • B needs to acquire a resource that is locked by A.

Deadlock handling will not deal with situations such as:

  • A needs to acquire a resource that is locked by B.
  • B locked the table in an interactive psql session then took the afternoon off without committing, rolling back or logging out.

From what you describe it sounds like one of your database sessions is not releasing its resources. Maybe it's missing a COMMIT etc. It's not a deadlock as far as Postgres is concerned because for all it knows there is a perfectly valid reason why the lock is being held that long.

One thing you can do is set a lock timeout. This will mean that there is an upper limit on how long a process will wait to try and get a lock before it gives up and flags a problem.

Lock time out and other settings documented at: http://www.postgresql.org/docs/9.3/static/runtime-config-client.html

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  • Yes, I suspect that somehow some resources are just not released like they should be, as you say. So it seems that Postgres' deadlock detector is really not at fault here, so I'll close this question. Thanks for the help! – rkrzr Aug 14 '15 at 14:37
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Now my understanding was that the deadlock detector in Postgres should be able to figure out that there is a deadlock and then proceed to resolve it by rolling back one of the blocked transactions, so that the other one could proceed and then retrying the first one.

This is only the case if the deadlock is between PostgreSQL backends, where each backend is waiting on another.

People often seem to expect the deadlock detector to handle cases where the deadlock passes through the application layer too. This is not the case.

The deadlock detector can handle this:

  • tx1 holds lock on row 1 of table x, tries to update row 2 of table x
  • tx2 holds lock on row 2 of table x, tries to update row 1 of table x

It can not help with this:

  • application thread A owning the session with tx1 is waiting on a result from another thread, B
  • tx1 holds lock on row 1 of table x while in an open transaction
  • application thread B owns the session with tx2
  • tx2 is trying to UPDATE row 1 of table x, which tx1 already holds

Both of these are deadlocks. PostgreSQL can only help with the first one. It has no way to know what the application state is, and has no idea that tx1 can never progress and release its lock on the row tx2 is waiting on because the app thread owning it is waiting for tx2 to finish. The deadlock involves both a wait in the database and a wait in the application, and neither has the full picture.

Note that one query waiting on another is not a deadlock. A deadlock only arises where there's a cycle that cannot be broken because no backend can progress without another one progressing, and they're all waiting on each other.

Most likely your situation is like the second case, where the application is involved in the deadlock.

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  • When you say "application thread A owning the session with tx1 is waiting on a result from another thread, B" do you mean that our application threads are communicating somehow? Because that is not the case. There are indeed multiple threads (and multiple processes) but they do not communicate. – rkrzr Aug 6 '15 at 13:51
  • @rkrzr In that case, you need to supply concrete data showing that a deadlock is occurring. I suggest something like \copy (SELECT * FROM pg_stat_activity INNER JOIN pg_locks USING (pid)) WITH (FORMAT CSV, HEADER), but be aware that might contain sensitive detail, so adjust if needed. – Craig Ringer Aug 6 '15 at 13:57
  • I unfortunately can't reproduce the problem any more right now, but I will update this question with the query you gave once it occurs again. – rkrzr Aug 6 '15 at 14:20

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