1

I am implementing a template class "Holder" which should be later specialized to contain objects of different classes. The Holder stores the object is as an attribute. When storing objects which require an argument in the constructor the holder class fails on instantiation:

#include <iostream>

template<class _StoredClass>
class Holder 
{
  protected:

    _StoredClass storedObject;

  public:

    void setData(_StoredClass toStore) { storedObject = toStore; }

    _StoredClass getData() { return storedObject; }

};

class DummyClass 
{
  private:
    int id;
  public: 
    DummyClass(int myId)
    {
      id = myId;
    }
    void welcome()
    {
      std::cout << "This is a method of the class to which the template fits" << std::endl;
    }
};

class DummyHolder : public Holder<DummyClass> {
  public: 
    void hello()
    {
      std::cout << "You successfully created a class that inherited from a specialized template. Hello!" << std::endl;
    }
};

int main () {
  DummyClass dummyObject(1);
  dummyObject.welcome();
  DummyHolder dummyHolder;  //error: no matching function for call to ‘DummyClass::DummyClass()’
  dummyHolder.hello();
  dummyHolder.setData(dummyObject);
}

How should the Holder class be implemented so that it can also store constructors with parameters but without adding new parameters to the template? Is it possible to avoid the instantiation of the attribute of the class when instantiating the class "Holder"? Actually, this object will later on be provided by the "setData" method. Therefore the instantiation is unneccesary.

I don't want to include the parameters of the constructor as another parameter of the template because that change will involve providing for each specialization this parameter, which in general is not needed.

2
  • 2
    Don't use names with leading underscore followed by a capital letter, those are reserved. Aug 6, 2015 at 11:43
  • 1
    Try it, then discover std::shared_ptr. Less cynically, you could look at how std::vector, for example, handles emplacement, and go from there.
    – Bathsheba
    Aug 6, 2015 at 11:43

2 Answers 2

2

You may create a template constructor:

template<class _StoredClass>
class Holder 
{
  protected:
    _StoredClass storedObject;

  public:

    template <typename ... Ts>
    Holder(Ts&&...args) : storedObject(std::forward<Ts>(args)...) {}

    void setData(const _StoredClass& toStore) { storedObject = toStore; }
    const _StoredClass& getData() const { return storedObject; }

};

Update DummyHolder to

class DummyHolder : public Holder<DummyClass>
{
public: 
    DummyHolder(int i) : Holder<DummyClass>(i) {}

    void hello()
    {
      std::cout << "You successfully created a class that inherited from a specialized template. Hello!" << std::endl;
    }
};

And in main:

DummyHolder dummyHolder(42);
0
1

Is it possible to avoid the instantiation of the attribute of the class when instantiating the class "Holder"?

You could use boost::optional:

#include <boost/optional.hpp>
template<class StoredClass>
class Holder 
{
protected:
    boost::optional<StoredClass> storedObject;
public:
    void setData(const StoredClass& toStore) { storedObject = toStore; }

    StoredClass getData() { return *storedObject; }

}; 

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