6

(Posted already at https://www.ruby-forum.com/topic/6876320, but crossposted here, because I did not receive a response so far).

A question about parallelizing tests in Minitest and/or Test::Unit (i.e. proper use of parallelize_me!):

Assume that I have some helper methods, which are needed by several tests. From my understanding, I could NOT do something like this in such a method (simplified example):

def prep(m,n)
 @pid = m
 @state = n
end

def process
 if @stat > 5 && @pid != 0
   ...
 else
   ...
 end
end

I think I can't do this in Minitest and test-unit, because if I call prep and process from several of my test function, the tests can not be parallelized anymore - those test functions all set and read the same instance variable. Right?

Now, my question is, whether the following approach would be safe for parallelization: I make all of these mutable instance variables a hash, which I initialized in setup like this:

def setup
  @pid ||= {}
  @state ||= {}
end

My "helper methods" receive a key (for example, the name of the test method) and use it to access the their "own" hash element:

def prep(key,m,n)
 @pid[key] = m
 @state[key] = n
end

def process
 if @stat[key] > 5 && @pid[key] != 0
   ...
 else
   ...
 end
end

It's a bit ugly, but: Is this a reliable approach? Is this way of accessing a hash thread-safe? How can I do it better?

1
+50

At least in Minitest you can safely do, for example,

setup do
  @form = Form.new
end

without @form getting mixed up between parallel tests, so this approach should be safe too:

def setup
  @stat = m
  @pid = n
end

which means that your original approach should be safe as well.

================

UPDATE

consider the following gist with a piece of code that define 100 different tests accessing @random which is set in setup https://gist.github.com/bbozo/2a64e1f53d29747ca559

You will notice that the stuff set in setup isn't shared among tests, it is run before every test, basically every test is encapsulated so thread safety isn't an issue.

2
  • How can my original approach work? setup is called just right before any test case, and the instance variables (@stat ...) are shared between the test cases. If the cases run in parallel (in several threads), we have a race conditions on the instance variables. Aug 11 '15 at 15:15
  • It does indeed! However, the gist-code you wrote, doesn't actually prove the case. In most cases, the output is just a sequence of setup/test/setup/test/..., so even if the variable would be shared among tests, you would get the output. The two cases, where the output is setup/setup/test/test, could, maybe, an artefact of output buffering. I took the liberty to modify your code a bit, to rule out these cases, and the modified code really proves your statement. Aug 12 '15 at 5:17
0

Your approach with the hashes makes sense, and it will work to distinguish between the threads. The problem lies with the Global Interpreter Lock.

Unless your helper methods are IO-bound (make HTTP requests, socket requests, handle local files), you won't see a speed improvement because Ruby will pretty much (to simplify things) run your code sequentially over multiple threads, without a guaranteed run order.

Good luck!

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.