Update: It must have been something stupid in another part of the code. It works now, so the bindToController syntax is fine.

We are using AngularJS 1.4, which introduced a new way to use bindToController in directives.

After quite a bit of reading (and maybe not understanding everything), we defined our directive like this:

  .directive('mdAddress', function mdAddress() {
    var directive = {
      restrict: 'EA',
      scope: {},
      bindToController: {
        address: '='
      },
      templateUrl: 'modules/address/address.html',
      controller: AddressController,
      controllerAs: 'dir'
    };

Calling it from another view like this:

  <md-address address="vm.address"></md-address>

Having previously defined in the view controller:

  vm.address = {
    street: null,
    countryCode: null,
    cityCode: null,
    postalCode: null
  };

Referencing the variables in the directive template like this:

  <md-input-container>
    <label>{{'ADDRESSNUMBER' | translate}}</label>
    <input type="number" ng-model="dir.address.streetNumber">
  </md-input-container>

We spent 4h trying to figure out why our directive was not working. Well, it was working, but the two-way binding between the controller and the directive was not, vm.address.street was hopelessly set to null.

After a while, we just tried the old way:

  .directive('mdAddress', function mdAddress() {
    var directive = {
      restrict: 'EA',
      scope: {
        address: '='
      },
      bindToController: true,
      templateUrl: 'modules/address/address.html',
      controller: AddressController,
      controllerAs: 'dir'
    };

And it magically worked. Any idea WHY?

  • What did you have in your modules/address/address.html template? If you were trying to reference vm at all in the template, then that would cause a null issue since vm doesn't exist in the scope of your directive. Also if you were trying to just bind to address in the directive template, that also wouldn't exist as you're binding your controller as dir, so it would have to be dir.address – Joe Pontani Aug 6 '15 at 17:34
  • In the template we referenced the elements with dir: <input type="number" ng-model="dir.address.streetNumber">. I edited the main post to clarify this. Thanks. – LeoLozes Aug 6 '15 at 17:37
  • Please, provide two plunkers, for both cases. There is simple explanation for that, but it is plain text doesn't give a clear idea of what you exactly did. – estus Aug 6 '15 at 17:46
  • I ran into a similar issue pre-upgrade to 1.4+. Any chance original issue was still referencing older version of Angular? – bingles Jul 18 '16 at 12:13
  • Hmm, it's a possibility, although I'm pretty sure we changed the angular version before trying this. Hard to tell right now :) – LeoLozes Jul 19 '16 at 7:16
up vote 19 down vote accepted

Update:

Thanks to the reference to this blog post, I need to update my answer. Since AngularJS 1.4 it really seems, that you can use

scope: {},
bindToController: {
  variable: '='
}

which will do the (exact) same thing as the old syntax:

scope: {
  variable: '='
},
bindToController: true

The useful lines from the AngularJS source code to explain this behavior:

if (isObject(directive.scope)) {
  if (directive.bindToController === true) {
    bindings.bindToController = parseIsolateBindings(directive.scope,
                                                     directiveName, true);
    bindings.isolateScope = {};
  } else {
    bindings.isolateScope = parseIsolateBindings(directive.scope,
                                                 directiveName, false);
  }
}
if (isObject(directive.bindToController)) {
  bindings.bindToController =
      parseIsolateBindings(directive.bindToController, directiveName, true);
}

Source: AngularJS 1.4.0

Original answer:

Hopefully, I can explain you why this behavior you experienced is correct and where you did missunderstand the concept of scope binding there.

Let me explain, what you did in your first code snippet:

.directive('mdAddress', function mdAddress() {
    var directive = {
      restrict: 'EA',
      scope: {},
      bindToController: {
        address: '='
      },
      templateUrl: 'modules/address/address.html',
      controller: AddressController,
      controllerAs: 'dir'
    };

With scope: {}, you created an isolated scope (without any inheritance) for your mdAddress directive. That means: No data is passed between the parent controller and your directive.

Having this in mind, regarding your second code snippet:

<md-address address="vm.address"></md-address>

vm.address from your parent controller/view will be assigned as expression to the address attribute of the directive, but as you defined an isolated scope before, the data is not passed into AddressController and therefore not available in the bindToController value.

Let's think of the scope object definition as the "which data will be passed in" and the bindToController as the "which data will be available in my view's controllerAs object".

So, now let's have a look at the last (and working code snippet):

.directive('mdAddress', function mdAddress() {
    var directive = {
      restrict: 'EA',
      scope: {
        address: '='
      },
      bindToController: true,
      templateUrl: 'modules/address/address.html',
      controller: AddressController,
      controllerAs: 'dir'
    };

There you created an isolated scope, too, but this time you added the address attribute to be passed in as an expression. So now the address you passed in from the view in the second snippet will be available in the controller's scope. Setting bindToController: true now, will bind all the current scope's properties to the controller (or more likely the controllerAs object). And now, it works as you would expect, because data will be passed in to the scope and data will be passed out to the controller's template scope.

Did that brief overview help you to better understand the concept of the scope and bindToController definition objects?

  • Thank you very much for your answer! It makes sense, and I fully understand the second part of your explanation, but the first part seem to say quite literally the opposite of the article I linked (about the new bindToController functionality). Specially when it says "This means we can move our scope: { name: '=' } example binding across to it to make it more explicit that isolate bindings are in fact inherited and bound to the controller", and replacesscope: {name: '='}, bindToController: true with scope: {}, bindToController: {name: '='}. – LeoLozes Aug 17 '15 at 7:05
  • 1
    Indeed, thanks for your response. You're right, I need to revert parts of my answer. The important line is the one from the AngularJS source code mentioned in the article - so the behavior should be the same in both cases. So maybe you really had some strange bug/typo in your code? Or can you reproduce everything from your question? Very interesting topic! – ConcurrentHashMap Aug 17 '15 at 17:36
  • Thanks, I thought I might have misunderstood the article :). Anyway, reviewing the AngularJS code, could it be that scope: {} returns isObject as true, since it's an empty object, not null? Then it would enter in the first part of the ifsentence ... I checked the AngularJS source code for isObject but I'm not sure ... – LeoLozes Aug 18 '15 at 10:29
  • Yes you are right, the first if condition will be evaluated to true in the case (as {} is indeed an object). Inside this if, the else branch will be triggered. But the second outer if condition will also be evaluated to true as directive.bindToController is also an object in your first code snippet. So bindings.bindToController and bindings.isolateScope will be populated. Don't know yet if this might run into these problems you had. It would really interesting to know if you can still reproduce the issue?! – ConcurrentHashMap Aug 18 '15 at 16:38
  • 1
    "Did that brief overview help you to better understand the concept of the scope and bindToController definition objects?" Sure did for me! – Jimmy Kane Apr 30 '17 at 16:09

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