I recently discovered the git worktree command:

The new working directory is linked to the current repository, sharing everything except working directory specific files such as HEAD, index, etc.

But the docs also indicate

… the support for submodules is incomplete. It is NOT recommended to make multiple checkouts of a superproject.

without further explanation as to what goes wrong.

Can someone enlighten me about the problems to expect? For example, will I be fine if I use the separate worktrees generated this way only for changes that do not affect the submodules?

Commit a83a66a is quite clear about that:

git-submodule.sh expects $GIT_DIR/config to be per-worktree, at least for the submodule.* part.
Here I think we have two options:

  • either update config.c to also read $GIT_DIR/config.worktree (which is per worktree) in addition to $GIT_DIR/config (shared) and store worktree-specific vars in the new place,
  • or update git-submodule.sh to read/write submodule.* directly from $GIT_DIR/config.submodule (per worktree).

These take time to address properly. Meanwhile, make a note to the user that they should not use multiple worktrees in submodule context.

More generally, where to put those submodules?

There are a couple options:

  • You may want to keep $SUB repos elsewhere (perhaps in a central place) outside $SUPER. This is also true for nested submodules where a superproject may be a submodule of another superproject.
  • You may want to keep all $SUB repos in $SUPER/modules (or some other place in $SUPER)
  • We could even push it further and merge all $SUB repos into $SUPER instead of storing them separately. But that would at least require ref namespace enabled.

This commit was an answer to commit df56607.


From a git user point of view, that means a git submodule update --init --recursive does not know exactly where to checkout the submodules.
Are they duplicated across all worktrees, or are they centralized somewhere? This isn't formally specified yet.


A year later (and with git 2.9), clacke adds in the comments

the confusion has been resolved, but not in an optimal manner.
Submodules work fine now as far as I can see, but each worktree has its own set of submodule repos (under motherrepo.git/worktree/<worktreename>/modules/<submodule>), so if you have a submodule that's big, you are facing some serious disk usage.


Git aliases to handle submodules in subtrees:

The alias git wtas expects that git wta is defined globally, or at least for all the repos involved. No warranty included. Your favorite pet may catch a painful infection if your path names have spaces in them.

It expects a structure in your repo like the one in a non-bare repo with submodules initiated, so if you have a bare repo, you'll have to mimic that setup. A submodule with the name (not path) foo goes in <your-.git-directory>/modules/foo (not .../foo.git). It will not crash if some module is not present in the repo, it just skips it.

There is room for improvement. It does not handle submodules within submodules, it only goes one level down. It may work to just change the submodule git wta call to a git wtas call, but I haven't verified this yet.

-- clacke


See also git worktree move (with Git 2.17+, Q2 2018).

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    Thanks for the research! But I’m still not sure about what actually breaks, and what actions would work nevertheless. Can you try to describe that that from a git user point of view? – Joachim Breitner Aug 7 '15 at 7:58
  • @JoachimBreitner from a git user, you don't know where the submodule are when you do a git submodule update --init ---recursive. Are they duplicated across all worktrees, or are they centralized somewhere? – VonC Aug 7 '15 at 7:59
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    As of today, I'm on this question because the confusion has been resolved, but not in an optimal manner. Submodules work fine now as far as I can see, but each worktree has its own set of submodule repos (under motherrepo.git/worktree/<worktreename>/modules/<submodule>), so if you have a submodule that's big, you are facing some serious disk usage. – clacke Jul 5 '16 at 16:44
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    @clacke Thank you. I have included your comment in the answer for more visibility. Are you using git 2.9? – VonC Jul 5 '16 at 17:26
  • Yes, git 2.9.0. – clacke Jul 6 '16 at 6:17

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