8

I would like to use mutate to calculate a column using the binomial distribution.

I have the following example:

library("dplyr")

d = data.frame(ref = rbinom(100,100,0.5))
d$coverage = 100
d$prob = 0.5
d$eprob= d$ref / d$coverage
d = tbl_df(d)

mutate(d,
       ref1= ref,
       cov1 = coverage,
       eprob1 = eprob,
       ref2=rbinom(1, coverage, eprob),
       ref3=rbinom(1, cov1, eprob1)
       )

Result is like this:

Source: local data frame [100 x 9]

   ref coverage prob eprob ref1 cov1 eprob1 ref2 ref3
1   52      100  0.5  0.52   52  100   0.52   45   44
2   50      100  0.5  0.50   50  100   0.50   45   44
3   45      100  0.5  0.45   45  100   0.45   45   44
4   45      100  0.5  0.45   45  100   0.45   45   44
5   47      100  0.5  0.47   47  100   0.47   45   44
6   46      100  0.5  0.46   46  100   0.46   45   44
7   50      100  0.5  0.50   50  100   0.50   45   44
8   53      100  0.5  0.53   53  100   0.53   45   44
9   44      100  0.5  0.44   44  100   0.44   45   44
10  56      100  0.5  0.56   56  100   0.56   45   44

I don't get it - I want the mutate function to return a random number drawn from the binomial distribution given by ref and coverage (the "ref2")...

Mutate read the columns correctly - but something weird happens when calling rbinom...

Any help i appreciated.

14

Try changing the n of rbinom:

mutate(d,
   ref1= ref,
   cov1 = coverage,
   eprob1 = eprob,
   ref2=rbinom(100, coverage, eprob),
   ref3=rbinom(100, cov1, eprob1)
)

Or more generally:

mutate(d,
   ref1= ref,
   cov1 = coverage,
   eprob1 = eprob,
   ref2=rbinom(n(), coverage, eprob),
   ref3=rbinom(n(), cov1, eprob1)
)
  • 3
    An even more general solution is rbinom(n(), coverage, eprob), as n() finds the size of whatever data is being mutated. (This will also work with grouped tables) – David Robinson Aug 7 '15 at 13:19
  • @DavidRobinson - Yes, that's better. I'll edit my answer to reflect that. Thanks. – Alex Aug 7 '15 at 13:21
  • But won't this just use the same eprob value for all 100 draws? (This is not what I want - i wan't to draw 1 number from 100 different binomial distributions, since eprob takes on 100 different values). – pallevillesen Aug 7 '15 at 18:21
  • 1
    Just tested it - and you are right (not a surprise to you). Thanks a lot. Will accept this a a working answer. I don't really like the syntax though... Anyway - thanks a lot guys - you really helped me! – pallevillesen Aug 7 '15 at 18:30
  • 1
    I read the mutate syntax as each variable holds a single value - and then the rbinom(n(),...) is suddenly a vector of length n. But I should think of the variables as columns (vectors). – pallevillesen Aug 10 '15 at 10:57
1

Another solution would be :

d %>% rowwise() %>%
      mutate(ref1= ref,
             cov1 = coverage,
             eprob1 = eprob,
             ref2=rbinom(1, coverage, eprob),
             ref3=rbinom(1, cov1, eprob1))

Where the rowwise() command groups by (each) row and specifies that you need 1 random value for each row.

  • 1
    This works, but is much slower as the number of rows increases. – Alex Aug 7 '15 at 16:58
  • But I think this is the only one giving the correct answer, since the eprob is different for each row - I'll have to test it monday - but I am really, really gratefull for a working answer - since I discovered this bug in my code earlier today - and we're close to submitting the paper - so thanks! – pallevillesen Aug 7 '15 at 18:18
  • Ignore my comment - both solutions work great. The first one is faster - but the syntax for the last one may be more intuitive(?) – pallevillesen Aug 7 '15 at 18:35
  • I think the first one is better. My solution will sample N times if you have N rows. The first one will spot rows with same probabilities and will group them together. It's faster to sample 10 values from a given distribution, rather than sampling 10 times from the same given distribution. (10 is an example here).... Obviously, instead of grouping rowwise you group by the probability column. The approaches will he the same if in your N rows you have N unique probability values... PS: Good luck with the paper! – AntoniosK Aug 7 '15 at 18:57

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