54

In DRF, I have a simple ViewSet like this one:

class MyViewSet(viewsets.ViewSet):       

    def update(self, request):
        # do things...
        return Response(status=status.HTTP_200_OK)

When I try a PUT request, I get an error like method PUT not allowed. If I use def put(self, request): all things work fine. Accordingly to the docs I should use def update(): not def put():, why does it happen?

8 Answers 8

133

PUT needs id in URL by default

Sometimes there is the difference between POST and PUT, because PUT needs id in URL That's why you get the error: "PUT is not Allowed".

Example:

  • POST: /api/users/
  • PUT: /api/users/1/

Hope it'll save a lot of time for somebody

4
  • 4
    Note that if you just define the method put (instead of update via the DRF mixin) then it will work without an ID.
    – Ben
    Commented Dec 2, 2017 at 3:24
  • 1
    Sure but not all the time; imagine a 'singleton' resource, there will be no ID. A common use case for this might be if you have a /user/me endpoint representing the currently logged in user.
    – Ben
    Commented Sep 13, 2018 at 21:12
  • 2
    In my case this worked like a charm because I used a viewsets.ModelViewSet and a serializers.ModelSerializer related to it.
    – cpinamtz
    Commented Jul 12, 2020 at 7:27
  • Also you can use PATCH method to perform partial updates of the Django model
    – cpinamtz
    Commented Jul 12, 2020 at 7:28
13

Had a similar "Method PUT not allowed" issue with this code, because 'id' was missing in the request:

class ProfileStep2Serializer(serializers.ModelSerializer):
    class Meta:
        model = Profile
        fields = ('middle_initial', 'mobile_phone', 'address', 'apt_unit_num', 'city', 'state', 'zip')

class Step2ViewSet(viewsets.ModelViewSet):
    serializer_class = ProfileStep2Serializer

    def get_queryset(self):
        return Profile.objects.filter(pk=self.request.user.profile.id)

Turned out that i have missed 'id' in the serializer fields, so PUT request was NOT able to provide an id for the record. The fixed version of the serializer is below:

class ProfileStep2Serializer(serializers.ModelSerializer):
    class Meta:
        model = Profile
        fields = ('id', 'middle_initial', 'mobile_phone', 'address', 'apt_unit_num', 'city', 'state', 'zip')
1
  • 1
    u are really goooooood man ,you save me a lot of time !!
    – Kevin
    Commented Aug 6, 2020 at 21:45
7

This is because the APIView has no handler defined for .put() method so the incoming request could not be mapped to a handler method on the view, thereby raising an exception.

(Note: viewsets.ViewSet inherit from ViewSetMixin and APIView)

The dispatch() method in the APIView checks if a method handler is defined for the request method.If the dispatch() method finds a handler for the request method, it returns the appropriate response. Otherwise, it raises an exception MethodNotAllowed.

As per the source code of dispatch() method in the APIView class:

def dispatch(self, request, *args, **kwargs):       
        ...
        ...    
        try:
            self.initial(request, *args, **kwargs)

            # Get the appropriate handler method
            if request.method.lower() in self.http_method_names:
                 # here handler is fetched for the request method
                 # `http_method_not_allowed` handler is assigned if no handler was found
                handler = getattr(self, request.method.lower(),
                                  self.http_method_not_allowed)
            else:
                handler = self.http_method_not_allowed 

            response = handler(request, *args, **kwargs) # handler is called here

        except Exception as exc:
            response = self.handle_exception(exc)

        self.response = self.finalize_response(request, response, *args, **kwargs)
        return self.response

Since .put() method handler is not defined in your view, DRF calls the fallback handler .http_method_not_allowed. This raises an MethodNotAllowed exception.

The source code for .http_method_not_allowed() is:

def http_method_not_allowed(self, request, *args, **kwargs):
    """
    If `request.method` does not correspond to a handler method,
    determine what kind of exception to raise.
    """
    raise exceptions.MethodNotAllowed(request.method) # raise an exception 

Why it worked when you defined .put() in your view?

When you defined def put(self, request): in your view, DRF could map the incoming request method to a handler method on the view. This led to appropriate response being returned without an exception being raised.

7
  • So if I wanted to use create I would just map it? Commented Aug 8, 2015 at 18:13
  • 1
    Did you define a router in your urls when defining update() in your view? Commented Aug 8, 2015 at 18:35
  • I defined a router to register the viewSet Commented Aug 8, 2015 at 19:12
  • 2
    This method should work always. Please check if you have defined viewsets and routers properly as given in the documentation as the router will itself set the put function to point to the update function. So, whenever a PUT request comes, handler will execute the code for .update() action. Commented Aug 9, 2015 at 12:27
  • 3
    Does the URL you are calling contain the detail 'pk' path parameter? Cause calling PUT to the root resource, eg /users/ without /users/<pk> will result in a method not allowed. Commented Feb 19, 2016 at 17:29
6

This answer is right, Django REST framework: method PUT not allowed in ViewSet with def update(), PUT is not allowed, because DRF expects the instance id to be in the URL. That being said, using this mixin in your ViewSet is probably the best way to fix it (from https://gist.github.com/tomchristie/a2ace4577eff2c603b1b copy pasted below)

class AllowPUTAsCreateMixin(object):
    """
    The following mixin class may be used in order to support PUT-as-create
    behavior for incoming requests.
    """
    def update(self, request, *args, **kwargs):
        partial = kwargs.pop('partial', False)
        instance = self.get_object_or_none()
        serializer = self.get_serializer(instance, data=request.data, partial=partial)
        serializer.is_valid(raise_exception=True)

        if instance is None:
            lookup_url_kwarg = self.lookup_url_kwarg or self.lookup_field
            lookup_value = self.kwargs[lookup_url_kwarg]
            extra_kwargs = {self.lookup_field: lookup_value}
            serializer.save(**extra_kwargs)
            return Response(serializer.data, status=status.HTTP_201_CREATED)

        serializer.save()
        return Response(serializer.data)

    def partial_update(self, request, *args, **kwargs):
        kwargs['partial'] = True
        return self.update(request, *args, **kwargs)

    def get_object_or_none(self):
        try:
            return self.get_object()
        except Http404:
            if self.request.method == 'PUT':
                # For PUT-as-create operation, we need to ensure that we have
                # relevant permissions, as if this was a POST request.  This
                # will either raise a PermissionDenied exception, or simply
                # return None.
                self.check_permissions(clone_request(self.request, 'POST'))
            else:
                # PATCH requests where the object does not exist should still
                # return a 404 response.
                raise
1

Suppose

you have registered a route like this (in urls.py)

router = DefaultRouter()
router.register(r'users', UserViewSet, basename='user-viewset')
urlpatterns += router.urls

and your restapi routs starts with /api/.

ViewSets generates follow routs.

create a user (send user object in body)
POST
/api/users/

get list of users
GET
/api/users/

get a user
GET
/api/users/{id}/

update a user (full object update)
PUT
/api/users/{id}/

partial update for a user
PATCH
/api/users/{id}/

delete a user
DELETE
/api/users/{id}/

0
def update(self, request, pk=None):
    data_in = request.data
    print(data_in)

    instance = self.get_object()
    serializer = self.get_serializer(instance, data=request.data, partial=False)
    serializer.is_valid(raise_exception=True)

    if instance is None:
        lookup_url_kwarg = self.lookup_url_kwarg or self.lookup_field
        lookup_value = self.kwargs[lookup_url_kwarg]
        extra_kwargs = {self.lookup_field: lookup_value}
        serializer.save(**extra_kwargs)
        return Response(serializer.data, status=status.HTTP_201_CREATED)
    serializer.save()
    data_out = serializer.data
    return Response(serializer.data)
1
  • While this code snippet may solve the question, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion. Commented Jun 9, 2020 at 19:25
0

Using Django viewsets you can easily map the method in the url e.g.

path('createtoken/', CreateTokenView.as_view({'post': 'create', 'put':'update'}))

Then in your class override the methods as you please:

class CreateTokenView(viewsets.ModelViewSet):
    queryset = yourSet.objects.all()
    serializer_class = yourSerializer

    def create(self, request, *args, **kwargs):
        #any method you want here
        return Response("response")

    def update(self, request, *args, **kwargs):
        # any method you want here
        return Response("response")
0

I have multiple objects that are working with ModelViewSet and all have different (unique) fields for lookup.

So I came up with another solution for this question by defining put on a parent class and a new field lookup_body_field that can be used to associate payload with existing object:

class CustomViewSet(viewsets.ModelViewSet):
    lookup_body_field = 'id'

    def put(self, pk=None):
        lookup_value = self.request.data.get(self.lookup_body_field)
        if not lookup_value:
            raise ValidationError({self.lookup_body_field: "This field is mandatory"})

        obj = self.get_queryset().filter(**{self.lookup_body_field: lookup_value}).last()
        if not obj:
            return self.create(request=self.request)
        else:
            self.kwargs['pk'] = obj.pk
            return self.update(request=self.request)


class MyViewSetA(CustomViewSet)
    model = ModelA
    lookup_body_field = 'field_a'  # Unique field on ModelA

class MyViewSetB(CustomViewSet)
    model = ModelB
    lookup_body_field = 'field_b'  # Unique field on ModelA


    

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.