96

I have a two part question

Best-Practice

  • I have an algorithm that performs some operation on a data structure using the public interface
  • It is currently a module with numerous static methods, all private except for the one public interface method.
  • There is one instance variable that needs to be shared among all the methods.

These are the options I can see, which is the best?:

  • Module with static ('module' in ruby) methods
  • Class with static methods
  • Mixin module for inclusion into the data structure
  • Refactor out the part of the algorithm that modifies that data structure (very small) and make that a mixin that calls the static methods of the algorithm module

Technical part

Is there any way to make a private Module method?

module Thing
  def self.pub; puts "Public method"; end
  private
  def self.priv; puts "Private method"; end
end

The private in there doesn't seem to have any effect, I can still call Thing.priv without issue.

  • 5
    FYI there's no such thing as a 'static' method in ruby, they're called class instance methods – brad Jan 12 '11 at 20:00
  • 27
    An old comment, but as it has four upvotes, I must point out that there's no such thing as a 'class instance method'. 'Class method' is the correct term. – micapam Mar 14 '13 at 23:34
  • 5
    private only affects instance methods, not class methods. use private_class_method instead: module Thing; def self.pub; end; private_class_method :pub; end – apeiros Jan 14 '14 at 16:12
84

I think the best way (and mostly how existing libs are written) do this by making a class within the module that deals with all the logic, and the module just provides a convenient method, e.g.

module GTranslate
  class Translator
    def perform( text ); 'hola munda'; end
  end

  def self.translate( text )
    t = Translator.new
    t.perform( text )
  end
end
  • 14
    Ruby newb here. In this example, is the Translator class exposed as part of the public interface of the module? Can the 'perform' method have its access restricted to GTranslate? – rshepherd Jul 23 '11 at 20:46
  • 1
    @rshepherd The perform is not the method that is supposed to be private here, the private method is the private method in the Translator class (@ucron's example does not have any, what is very unfortunate). GTranslate.translate is only a convenient method for GTranslate::Translator#perform, there is no real gain concealing it, if it was at all possible. – michelpm Apr 24 '13 at 10:51
  • 21
    I'm not sure what's achieved by having a class here. If the goal is to have a private module method, then this doesn't meet the goal. Because you can access the "perform" method from outside the module by calling GTranslate::Translator.new.perform. In otherwords, it is not private. – Zack Xu Jun 26 '13 at 16:07
  • 1
    @jschorr I think the Op and this answer intend to make a private class or module method, not an instance method. Also, that won't make any instance method private as self.translate declares a class/module method. – konsolebox Sep 16 '14 at 10:02
  • 4
    GTranslate::Translator.new.perform(text) — convoluted, but not private! – abhillman Oct 14 '16 at 19:07
72

There's also Module.private_class_method, which arguably expresses more intent.

module Foo
  def self.included(base)
    base.instance_eval do
      def method_name
        # ...
      end
      private_class_method :method_name
    end
  end
end

For the code in the question:

module Thing
  def self.pub; puts "Public method"; end
  def self.priv; puts "Private method"; end
  private_class_method :priv
end

Ruby 2.1 or newer:

module Thing
  def self.pub; puts "Public method"; end
  private_class_method def self.priv; puts "Private method"; end
end
  • I wasn't aware of this. Will it work before the method definition too, like private? – Marnen Laibow-Koser Oct 25 '11 at 14:08
  • 6
    This answer along with @JCooper's answer is the real solution. @MarnenLaibow-Koser It doesn't. You can consider the other answer at the cost of more grouping and indentations. It may actually be the preferred solution to some. (Replying just for the sake of reference.) – konsolebox Sep 16 '14 at 10:24
35
module Writer
  class << self
    def output(s)
      puts upcase(s)
    end

    private

    def upcase(s)
      s.upcase
    end
  end
end

Writer.output "Hello World"
# -> HELLO WORLD

Writer.upcase "Hello World"
# -> so.rb:16:in `<main>': private method `upcase' called for Writer:Module (NoMethodError)
  • 3
    This should be the accepted answer. Clean and idiomatic in my opinion. – Martin Nyaga Mar 25 '18 at 11:14
  • Genius! Works wonders! – CatBrownie Jan 21 at 19:00
28

You can use the "included" method to do fancy things when a module is mixed in. This does about what you want I think:

module Foo
  def self.included(base)
    class << base 
      def public_method
        puts "public method"
      end
      def call_private
        private_method
      end
      private
      def private_method
        puts "private"
      end
    end
  end
end

class Bar
  include Foo
end

Bar.public_method

begin
  Bar.private_method
rescue
  puts "couldn't call private method"
end

Bar.call_private
  • 5
    That's clever. So it's possible, but probably not worth it. – Daniel Beardsley Nov 28 '08 at 4:21
  • works nice. I used included do |base| [...] end instead of def – Crystark Aug 1 '14 at 12:05
  • 4
    @Crystark: That syntax only exists on modules that extend ActiveSupport::Concern if I'm not mistaken. ie it's a rails thing. – Vaz Jan 21 '15 at 23:42
12

Unfortunately, private only applies to instance methods. The general way to get private "static" methods in a class is to do something like:

class << self
  private

  def foo()
   ....
  end
end

Admittedly I haven't played with doing this in modules.

  • 7
    This is not true. You can have private class methods and private module methods. – mikeycgto Jun 18 '12 at 23:46
  • You can have private class methods, but just doing this won't make .foo a private class method: "private; def self.foo()" – Ari Aug 21 '13 at 20:16
  • @mikeycgto Care to elaborate the difference between private class methods and private module methods? Because I think they're just the same. Note that both private and private_class_method are owned by Module not Class. This code works by the way and it is the alternative to using private_class_method. – konsolebox Sep 16 '14 at 9:51
2

A nice way is like this

module MyModule
  class << self
    def public_method
      # you may call the private method here
      tmp = private_method
      :public
    end

    private def private_method
      :private
    end
  end
end

# calling from outside the module
puts MyModule::public_method
2

The best pattern that I've found by doing this in Rails is to give up on modules that want to have private methods and use a Singleton class instead. It doesn't feel right but it does work and seems cleaner that then other examples I've seen in this question.

Would love to hear other opinions on this.

Example:

ErrorService.notify("Something bad happened")

class ErrorService
  include Singleton

  class << self
    delegate :notify, to: :instance
  end

  def notify(message, severity: :error)
    send_exception_notification(message)
    log_message(message, severity)
  end

  private

  def send_exception_notification(message)
    # ...
  end

  def log_message(message, severity)
    # ...
  end
end
  • Bad answer. This is not the recommended approach. – GuyPaddock Sep 29 '17 at 1:15
1

What's about storing methods as lambdas within class variables/constants?

module MyModule
  @@my_secret_method = lambda {
    # ...
  }
  # ...
end

For test:
UPD: huge update of this code after 6 years shows cleaner way to declare private method d

module A
  @@L = lambda{ "@@L" }
  def self.a ; @@L[] ; end
  def self.b ; a ; end

  class << self
    def c ; @@L[] ; end
    private
    def d ; @@L[] ; end
  end
  def self.e ; c ; end
  def self.f ; self.c ; end
  def self.g ; d ; end
  def self.h ; self.d ; end

  private
  def self.i ; @@L[] ; end
  class << self
    def j ; @@L[] ; end
  end

  public
  def self.k ; i ; end
  def self.l ; self.i ; end
  def self.m ; j ; end
  def self.n ; self.j ; end
end

for expr in %w{ A.a A.b A.c A.d A.e A.f A.g A.h A.i A.j A.k A.l A.m A.n }
  puts "#{expr} => #{begin ; eval expr ; rescue => e ; e ; end}"
end

Here we see that:

A.a => @@L
A.b => @@L
A.c => @@L
A.d => private method `d' called for A:Module
A.e => @@L
A.f => @@L
A.g => @@L
A.h => private method `d' called for A:Module
A.i => @@L
A.j => @@L
A.k => @@L
A.l => @@L
A.m => @@L
A.n => @@L

1) @@L can not be accesses from outside but is accessible from almost everywhere
2) class << self ; private ; def successfully makes the method d inaccessible from outside and from inside with self. but not without it -- this is weird
3) private ; self. and private ; class << self do not make methods private -- they are accessible both with and without self.

  • lambdas are not at all the same thing as methods. lambdas are of type Proc, whereas methods are of type Method. – Michael Dorst Sep 5 '13 at 6:58
  • 1
    global variables are bad – achempion Oct 7 '13 at 10:04
  • @achempion, where do you see them? – Nakilon Oct 7 '13 at 10:55
  • @Nakilon my apologies, edit your answer if you want that I cancel my vote – achempion Oct 7 '13 at 13:38
  • @achempion, did. – Nakilon Oct 7 '13 at 14:02
0

Make a private module or class

Constants are never private. However, it's possible to create a module or class without assigning it to a constant.

So an alternative to :private_class_method is to create a private module or class and define public methods on it.

module PublicModule
  def self.do_stuff(input)
    @private_implementation.do_stuff(input)
  end

  @private_implementation = Module.new do
    def self.do_stuff(input)
      input.upcase # or call other methods on module
    end
  end
end

Usage:

PublicModule.do_stuff("whatever") # => "WHATEVER"

See the docs for Module.new and Class.new.

  • I really like this method. But it doesn't seem possible to remove the .self in the method definitions, include it in another class, and use them as instance_methods of the including class. Do you know if there is any way to make it work? – Shiyason Mar 10 '17 at 9:43

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