8

I'd like to be able to have the operator of my class interact with regular types in a way that I define. Lets say, for example, I have:

class Mynum(object):
  def __init__(self, x):
   self.x = x
  def __add__(self, other):
   return self.x + other.x

a = Mynum(1)
b = Mynum(2)

print a+b

This works just fine, but now if I try to do:

print a+2

I get an error since an int does not have a member named x. How do I define Mynum + int in the class? This sounds like a job for decorators or metaclasses, but I'm terribly unfamiliar with their usage. This question seems similar, but not quite identical.

2
  • check the type or other or presence of x attribute. Jul 6, 2010 at 17:32
  • don't forget to do: __radd__ = __add__ also (even though it doesn't fix your problem)
    – jcao219
    Jul 6, 2010 at 17:35

3 Answers 3

20
def __add__(self, other):
    if isinstance(other, self.__class__):
        return self.x + other.x
    elif isinstance(other, int):
        return self.x + other
    else:
        raise TypeError("unsupported operand type(s) for +: '{}' and '{}'").format(self.__class__, type(other))
3
  • 1
    Thank you, I've never seen isinstance before. Is this considered the correct way to do this, or should I use the try/except block proposed by unutbu?
    – Hooked
    Jul 6, 2010 at 17:53
  • The try… except clause is fast when no exception is raised, and slow otherwise. Therefore, you can use it if adding two instances of your class is the most common use of the overloaded addition. Otherwise, the insinstance approach is good. Jul 6, 2010 at 18:54
  • 2
    Shouldn't you return NotImplemented instead of raising and exception yourself?
    – jpcgt
    Apr 7, 2016 at 14:00
5
class Mynum(object):
    def __init__(self, x):
        self.x = x
    def __add__(self, other):
        try:
            return self.x + other.x
        except AttributeError:
            return self.x + other
    __radd__=__add__

a = Mynum(1)
b = Mynum(2)

print(a+b)
# 3
print(a+2)
# 3
print(2+a)
# 3
2

Why use the extra switching and/or exception handling? Using the following would be a simpler approach:

class MyNum(object):
    def __init__(self, x):
        self.x = x
    def __add__(self, other):
        return other + self.x
    __radd__ = __add__
x = MyNum(5)
y = MyNum(6)
print x + 2
7
print 2 + x
7
print x + y
11
print y + x
11

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