2

How to find the maximum sum of n consecutive numbers of an array? For example if our array is {2,5,3,4,6} and n == 2 then output should be 10 (i.e. 6 + 4).

I am able to get the logic right for small values of array size and small values of n. But when the array size and n are too large like around 105, my code takes a lot of time. Please suggest an optimized approach.

My code snipped:

for(int i = 0; i <= n - h; i++) {
  int count = 0;
  for(int k = i; k < i + h; k++) {
    count = count + arr[k];
  }
  if(i == 0) {
    ans[z] = count;
  } else if(i != 0) {
    if(count < ans[z]) {
      ans[z] = count;
    }
  }
  count = 0;
}
9
  • Sorry for the error.Its maximum
    – swap96
    Aug 8 '15 at 8:14
  • My first approach is to traverse the array once from 0 to the upper bound, calculating the sum of the 2 previous items and comparing with the previous sum. How is your code like? Aug 8 '15 at 8:16
  • for(int i=0;i<=n-h;i++) { int count=0; for(int k=i;k<i+h;k++) { count=count+arr[k]; } if(i==0) { ans[z]=count; } else if(i!=0) { if(count<ans[z]) { ans[z]=count; } } count=0; } This is my code snippet
    – swap96
    Aug 8 '15 at 8:20
  • What language is your code snipped? (Looks like C or C++ to me.)
    – das-g
    Aug 8 '15 at 9:04
  • you may refer to my sample code below, it does not use nested loop to calculate the sum of next sub array
    – terryfkjc
    Aug 8 '15 at 9:24

13 Answers 13

7

here is my idea: traverse the array from 0 to (array length - N), and determine the sum of next N-item by using the following expression:
sum of next N-item = previous sum - first item in previous sub-array + last item in next sub-array

Example:

Array = {2,5,3,4,6}

when i = 0, sum = (2 + 5) = 7, max sum = 7

when i = 1, sum = 7 - 2 + 3 = 8, since 8 > 7, so max sum = 8

when i = 2, sum = 8 - 5 + 4 = 7, since 7

when i = 3, sum = 7 - 3 + 6 = 10, since 10 > 8, so max sum = 10

below is the sample code in c#

static int GetLargestSum(int[] array, int n)
{
    int largestSum = 0;
    int previousSum = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i <= array.Length - n; i++)
    {
        if (i == 0)
        {
            for (int j = 0; j < n; j++)
            {
                largestSum += array[j];
            }

            previousSum = largestSum;
        }
        else
        {
            int currentSum = previousSum - array[i - 1] + array[i + n - 1];
            if (currentSum > largestSum)
            {
                largestSum = currentSum;
            }
            previousSum = currentSum;
        }
    }

    return largestSum;
}
9
  • 1
    Shouldn't that be "[...] + last item in next sub-array" and consequently in your else block int currentSum = previousSum - array[i - 1] + array[i + n - 1];?
    – das-g
    Aug 8 '15 at 9:02
  • @terryfkjc i would require a more optimized approach as this takes a lot of time for large values of n and array-size.
    – swap96
    Aug 8 '15 at 9:16
  • @swap96 i am not sure how "optimized" you need, have you benchmark in your actual situation? when n is large, and the array is not sorted, the most optimize way should be O(n)
    – terryfkjc
    Aug 8 '15 at 9:22
  • My array size and 'n' can be upto 10^6.
    – swap96
    Aug 8 '15 at 9:24
  • 1
    I would have written it with the intro sum-the-first-n loop outside the sliding-window loop (which would start with i = 1). You want the compiler to restructure it that way anyway. Also, @das-g is right: you have a bug in your sliding-window. The element you subtract must be n+1 away from the one you're adding. Currently, it's always a distance of 2. Aug 8 '15 at 11:00
2
function maxSubelementsSum(inputArray, count) {
  let maxSum = 0;
  for (let i = 0; i < count; i++) {
    maxSum += inputArray[i];
  }
  let tempSum = maxSum;
  for (let i = count; i < inputArray.length; i++) {
    tempSum = tempSum + inputArray[i] - inputArray[i - count];
    maxSum = Math.max(tempSum, maxSum);

  }
  return maxSum;
}
1

Using Java 8.

int[] numArr = {1,3,5,6,7,12,14,2,3,4}; 
List<Integer> intList = Arrays.stream(numArr).boxed().collect(Collectors.toList());         
List<Integer> intSumList = new ArrayList<>();
for(int i=0; i<=numArr.length-3; i++)
{
    int intSum = intList.stream().skip(i).limit(3).mapToInt(Integer::intValue).sum();       
    intSumList.add(Integer.valueOf(intSum));
}       
int maxConsecutiveSum = intSumList.stream().reduce(Integer::max).get(); 
System.out.println("Max sum using 3 consecutive integers :"+maxConsecutiveSum);
1

There are a lot of ways to go about this.
So far the most optimized I could think of is in O(n).
Where you get to traverse the array once.

I used the sliding window pattern in solving this

Here is the main idea behind the solution:

  • Get the sum of the first n and store in a variable as temporary max
  • Set your max to the temporary max
  • Loop through the array
  • At any point in the loop, substract the previous element from the temporary max
  • And add the element in the next n index to the temporary max
  • Finally compare your main max to the temporary max
  • If the max is lesser then set your max to the temporary max
  • function maxSubarraySum(array, num){
    
        let tempMax = 0
        
        for(let i=0; i<num; i++){
            tempMax += array[i] 
        }
        
        let max = tempMax
    
    
    
        for(i=1; i<array.length - (num-1); i++){
    
            // Substract the element you are at from the max
            // Add the element at the ith + num
            // compare with the max and reinitialize
    
            let subs = tempMax - array[i-1]
    
            tempMax = subs + array[i + num - 1]
    
            if(max < tempMax){
               max = tempMax
            }
              
        }
    
        return(max)
        
    }
    
    
    0

    The main improvement possible for your technique is a sliding window. Integer addition has an inverse, subtraction. This makes it possible to drop elements out of the sum and add new ones, instead of re-computing from scratch. (Terryfkjc's answer demonstrates this).

    As Terryfkjc commented on his answer, there's thread-level parallelism to be had. You can have different threads check different parts of the array. If the size of the sliding window is more than half the size of the array, then summing the first n should be threaded. Dividing the work between threads is most tricky when n is about half the size of the array. Much bigger, and it can't slide as far. Much smaller, and most of the work is just the sliding.

    If you're targeting a CPU with vector instructions, we can vectorize the initial sum of the first w (window size / width) elements easily enough with SIMD. For example, using x86 SSE (C/C++ intrinsics):

    #include <immintrin.h>
    const __m128i *array_vec = (__m128i*)array;
    __m128i sums = _mm_loadu_si128(array_vec);  // or start with _mm_setzero_si128()
    
     // careful to get the loop start/end and increment correct,
     // whether you count by vectors (i++) or by elements (i+=4)
     // You may need a scalar cleanup at the end if window width isn't a multiple of the vector width
    for (int i=1; i < width/4 ; i+=1) {
        sums = _mm_add_epi32(sums, _mm_loadu_si128(array_vec+i));
        // if you know the input is aligned, and you're going to compile without AVX/AVX2, then do:
        // sums = _mm_add_epi32(sums, array_vec[i]);
    }
    __m128i hisums = _mm_bsrli_si128(sums, 8);  // get the high 2 elements into the low 2 elements of a separate vector
    sums = _mm_add_epi32(sums, hisums);  // one step of horizontal merging.    
    hisums = _mm_bsrli_si128(sums, 4);  // actually, pshufd would be faster for this, since it doesn't need a mov to preserve sums.
    sums = _mm_add_epi32(sums, hisums);
    
    int window_sum = _mm_cvtsi128_si32(sums);  // get the low 32bit element 
    

    I don't think it's possible to vectorize the sliding-window part. We can't usefully slide 4 separate windows, because every window (vector element) needs to see every array element.

    However, if we're interested in 4/8/16 different window sizes (preferably consecutive), then we can do that with vectors. So, at each loop iteration, we have a vector with the current sliding window sum. With SSE4.1 pmaxsd (for signed 32bit ints), we can do

    window_max = _mm_max_epi32(window_max, window_sums);
    

    The sliding window operation becomes: add the { a[i], a[i+1], a[i+2], a[i+3] }, while removing the same array element from all 4 vector elements. (Alternatively, broadcast the element to add, and subtract a vector of different elements.)

    __m128i add_elements = _mm_loadu_si128((__m128i*)&array[i]);  // load i, i+1, etc.
    __m128i sub_element = _mm_cvtsi32_si128(array[i-width-1]);
      sub_element = _mm_shuffle_epi32(sub_element, 0); // broadcast the low element of the vector to the other positions.
      // AVX2: use _mm_broadcastd_epi32
      // AVX512 has a broadcast mode for memory references that can be used with most instructions.  IDK how to use it with intrinsics.
    __m128i diff = _mm_sub_epi32(add_elements, sub_element);
    window_sums = _mm_add_epi32(window_sums, diff);
    

    Getting the loop start/end conditions right, and accounting for the last few elements correctly, is always the challenge with vectors.

    See https://stackoverflow.com/tags/x86/info for more about how to use vectors on x86.

    3
    • Perhaps it is possible to compute prefix sums with SSE/AVX, and then we can easily compute max(S[i+n] - S[i]) in vectorized way.
      – stgatilov
      Aug 10 '15 at 11:24
    • @stgatilov. Prefix sums would be useful if you could generate them on the fly as your array was being written, or if you wanted several different window sizes. Otherwise I think a 2-pass algo would be doomed to failure by memory bandwidth unless it fit in L2 (256k). And also, I don't think prefix sums can vectorize, because there's no independence between elements. Every p[i] needs to see a[i-i], a[i-2], etc. so you need a horizontal operation at every step. I think it's the same problem as trying to vectorize the sliding window directly. Aug 10 '15 at 11:46
    • @stgatilov: Turns out you can SIMD a prefix sum, but it takes a lot of shuffling. Maybe only worth it for floats, where add latency is higher. See also stackoverflow.com/questions/10587598/…. You can also parallelize prefix sums with threads, but the necessary access pattern doesn't look good for SIMD vectors. http.developer.nvidia.com/GPUGems3/gpugems3_ch39.html. Sep 10 '15 at 5:30
    0

    Using sliding window, where window size of 2

    arr = [2,5,3,4,6];
    
    sum = 0;
    temp_sum = 0;
    
    const add = (a,b) => a+b;
    
    for(let i=0;i<arr.length-1;i++){
      console.log(i, i+2,arr.slice(i,i+2));
      temp_sum = add.apply(null, arr.slice(i,i+2));
      if(sum < temp_sum){
        sum = temp_sum;
      }
    }
    
    console.log(sum);
    
    0

    here is a short fast solution :

        s = 0
        arrayMaxConsecutiveSum = (a, k) =>
        Math.max(...
            a.map(x => s += x - ~~a[~--k])
        )
    
    0
    def maxSubarraySum(array, noOfelements):
        start = 0
        sum = 0
        nextElement = 1
        maxSum = []
        while noOfelements < len(array)+1:
            for i in range(start, noOfelements):
                sum += array[i]
            maxSum.append(sum)
            sum = 0
            start = nextElement
            nextElement += 1
            noOfelements += 1
        return max(maxSum) if maxSum else None
    
    
    if __name__ == '__main__':
        print(maxSubarraySum([-1, -2, -5, -3, -8, -1, -5], 4) == -11)
        print(maxSubarraySum([1, -2, 5, 3, -8, 1, 5], 4) == 7)
        print(maxSubarraySum([1, 2, 5, 3, 8, 1, 5], 4) == 18)
        print(maxSubarraySum([1, 2, 5, 3, 8, 1, 5], 2) == 11)
        print(maxSubarraySum([], 4) == None)
    

    complexity = O(n*n) This will work for all given arrays including negative numbers.

    0

    Using sliding window technique

    int curr_sum = 0, max_sum = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
         curr_sum += v[i];
    }
    max_sum = curr_sum;
    for(int i = k; i < v.size(); i++)
    {
        curr_sum += v[i] - v[i-k];
        max_sum = max(max_sum, curr_sum);
    }
    
    cout<<max_sum;
    

    Time Complexity: θ(n)

    Auxiliary Space: O(1)

    Explanation: [ 1 8 30 -5 20 7] and n = 3

    from 0 to n-1 (0 to 2) curr_sum = 1+8+30 = 39

    max_sum = 39

    fromr n to v.size()-1 (3 to 5)

    curr_sum = prev sum + new element - prev window first element

    curr_sum = 39 +(-5)-1 = 33

    max_sum = max(39,33) = 39

    curr_sum = 33 + 20 - 8 = 45

    max_sum = max(39,45) = 45

    curr_sum = 45 + 7 - 30 = 22

    max_sum = max(45,22) = 45

    0

    let's use the sliding window approach, which performs the sum of sub-array of size n, then loop through the array till len(arr) - n and perform a simple comparison, you can consider this solution:

    def max_sum(arr, window):
        n = len(arr)
    
        if (n <= window):
            return -1
    
        window_sum = sum([arr[i] for i in range(window)])
        maxSum = window_sum
    
        for i in range(n - window):
            window_sum = window_sum - arr[i] + arr[i + window]
            maxSum = max(window_sum, maxSum)
        
        return maxSum
    
    -1

    Simplest of them all

    A=list(map(int,input().split(" ")))
    n=len(A)
    max=0
    for i in range(n-1):
        if(A[i]+A[i+1]>max):
            max=A[i]+A[i+1]
    print(max)
    
    -1

    Simply we can iterate the array and find the sum of two consecutive numbers

    let array = [2,5,3,4,6];
    let sum=0;
    let maxNumber = 0;
    for(let i=0; i<array.length;i++){
        sum = array[i] + array[i+1];
        if(sum >= maxNumber){
            maxNumber = sum;
        }
        
    }
    console.log("max of two digit :", maxNumber);
    
    -2

    The first thing I would suggest you is sorting the array using mergesort, this has a complexity time of O(n log(n)) then you only have to find the first n consecutive numbers iterating the array from the higher number to the lower one keeping the sum of the current consecutive numbers and this will take a complexity time of O(n). Greetings

    2
    • 2
      if we sort the array before calculate the sum, we will get 11 instead of 10 in {2,5,3,4,6}
      – terryfkjc
      Aug 8 '15 at 8:36
    • if you sort the array then order will not be conserved. and choosing first n elements will not guarantee that it is a contiguous subarray of given array. Jun 7 '17 at 19:58

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