24

Using ggord one can make nice linear discriminant analysis ggplot2 biplots (cf chapter 11, Fig 11.5 in "Biplots in practice" by M. Greenacre), as in

library(MASS)
install.packages("devtools")
library(devtools)
install_github("fawda123/ggord")
library(ggord)
data(iris)
ord <- lda(Species ~ ., iris, prior = rep(1, 3)/3)
ggord(ord, iris$Species)

enter image description here

I would also like to add the classification regions (shown as solid regions of the same colour as their respective group with say alpha=0.5) or the posterior probabilities of class membership (with alpha then varying according to this posterior probability and the same colour as used for each group) (as can be done in BiplotGUI, but I am looking for a ggplot2 solution). Would anyone know how to do this with ggplot2, perhaps using geom_tile ?

EDIT: below someone asks how to calculate the posterior classification probabilities & predicted classes. This goes like this:

library(MASS)
library(ggplot2)
library(scales)
fit <- lda(Species ~ ., data = iris, prior = rep(1, 3)/3)
datPred <- data.frame(Species=predict(fit)$class,predict(fit)$x)
#Create decision boundaries
fit2 <- lda(Species ~ LD1 + LD2, data=datPred, prior = rep(1, 3)/3)
ld1lim <- expand_range(c(min(datPred$LD1),max(datPred$LD1)),mul=0.05)
ld2lim <- expand_range(c(min(datPred$LD2),max(datPred$LD2)),mul=0.05)
ld1 <- seq(ld1lim[[1]], ld1lim[[2]], length.out=300)
ld2 <- seq(ld2lim[[1]], ld1lim[[2]], length.out=300)
newdat <- expand.grid(list(LD1=ld1,LD2=ld2))
preds <-predict(fit2,newdata=newdat)
predclass <- preds$class
postprob <- preds$posterior
df <- data.frame(x=newdat$LD1, y=newdat$LD2, class=predclass)
df$classnum <- as.numeric(df$class)
df <- cbind(df,postprob)
head(df)

           x        y     class classnum       setosa   versicolor virginica
1 -10.122541 -2.91246 virginica        3 5.417906e-66 1.805470e-10         1
2 -10.052563 -2.91246 virginica        3 1.428691e-65 2.418658e-10         1
3  -9.982585 -2.91246 virginica        3 3.767428e-65 3.240102e-10         1
4  -9.912606 -2.91246 virginica        3 9.934630e-65 4.340531e-10         1
5  -9.842628 -2.91246 virginica        3 2.619741e-64 5.814697e-10         1
6  -9.772650 -2.91246 virginica        3 6.908204e-64 7.789531e-10         1

colorfun <- function(n,l=65,c=100) { hues = seq(15, 375, length=n+1); hcl(h=hues, l=l, c=c)[1:n] } # default ggplot2 colours
colors <- colorfun(3)
colorslight <- colorfun(3,l=90,c=50)
ggplot(datPred, aes(x=LD1, y=LD2) ) +
    geom_raster(data=df, aes(x=x, y=y, fill = factor(class)),alpha=0.7,show_guide=FALSE) +
    geom_contour(data=df, aes(x=x, y=y, z=classnum), colour="red2", alpha=0.5, breaks=c(1.5,2.5)) +
    geom_point(data = datPred, size = 3, aes(pch = Species,  colour=Species)) +
    scale_x_continuous(limits = ld1lim, expand=c(0,0)) +
    scale_y_continuous(limits = ld2lim, expand=c(0,0)) +
    scale_fill_manual(values=colorslight,guide=F)

enter image description here

(well not totally sure this approach for showing classification boundaries using contours/breaks at 1.5 and 2.5 is always correct - it is correct for the boundary between species 1 and 2 and species 2 and 3, but not if the region of species 1 would be next to species 3, as I would get two boundaries there then - maybe I would have to use the approach used here where each boundary between each species pair is considered separately)

This gets me as far as plotting the classification regions. I am looking for a solution though to also plot the actual posterior classification probabilities for each species at each coordinate, using alpha (opaqueness) proportional to the posterior classification probability for each species, and a species-specific colour. In other words, with a stack of three images superimposed. As alpha blending in ggplot2 is known to be order-dependent, I think the colours of this stack would have to calculated beforehand though, and plotted using something like

qplot(x, y, data=mydata, fill=rgb, geom="raster") + scale_fill_identity() 

Here is a SAS example of what I am after:

enter image description here

Would anyone know how to do this perhaps? Or does anyone have any thoughts on how to best represent these posterior classification probabilities?

Note that the method should work for any number of groups, not just for this specific example.

6
  • can you add an example of your data layout?
    – Benvorth
    Aug 8 '15 at 13:39
  • ah, Iris, Forget my question :-)
    – Benvorth
    Aug 8 '15 at 13:39
  • Can you extract the data (classification regions, posterior probabilities) that should be plotted?
    – tonytonov
    Aug 10 '15 at 14:17
  • I've now added that bit and clarified my question a bit better! Aug 10 '15 at 22:11
  • Do you mean expand_limits() instead of expand_range() ?
    – lgautier
    Aug 14 '15 at 2:30
11
+25

I suppose the easiest way will be to show the posterior probabilities. It is pretty straightforward for your case:

datPred$maxProb <- apply(predict(fit)$posterior, 1, max)
ggplot(datPred, aes(x=LD1, y=LD2) ) +
  geom_raster(data=df, aes(x=x, y=y, fill = factor(class)),alpha=0.7,show_guide=FALSE) +
  geom_contour(data=df, aes(x=x, y=y, z=classnum), colour="red2", alpha=0.5, breaks=c(1.5,2.5)) +
  geom_point(data = datPred, size = 3, aes(pch = Species,  colour=Species, alpha = maxProb)) +
  scale_x_continuous(limits = ld1lim, expand=c(0,0)) +
  scale_y_continuous(limits = ld2lim, expand=c(0,0)) +
  scale_fill_manual(values=colorslight, guide=F)

enter image description here

You can see the points blend in at blue-green border.

1
  • 1
    nice possible solution - thanks for that! Although I would prefer not to shade my points as e.g. I was still thinking of highlighting incorrectly classified ones in red, plus maybe not all parts of the regions are well presented by points. So still looking for a solution to show them using alpha shading in the shaded background part to get something like the SAS output. Nevertheless +1 ! Aug 14 '15 at 12:32
11

Also just came up with the following easy solution: just make a column in df where class predictions are made stochastically, according to the posterior probabilities, which then results in dithering in uncertain regions, e.g. as in

fit = lda(Species ~ Sepal.Length + Sepal.Width, data = iris, prior = rep(1, 3)/3)
ld1lim <- expand_range(c(min(datPred$LD1),max(datPred$LD1)),mul=0.5)
ld2lim <- expand_range(c(min(datPred$LD2),max(datPred$LD2)),mul=0.5)

rest as above, and inserting

lvls=unique(df$class)
df$classpprob=apply(df[,as.character(lvls)],1,function(row) sample(lvls,1,prob=row))

p=ggplot(datPred, aes(x=LD1, y=LD2) ) +
  geom_raster(data=df, aes(x=x, y=y, fill = factor(classpprob)),hpad=0, vpad=0, alpha=0.7,show_guide=FALSE) +
  geom_point(data = datPred, size = 3, aes(pch = Group,  colour=Group)) +
  scale_fill_manual(values=colorslight,guide=F) +
  scale_x_continuous(limits=rngs[[1]], expand=c(0,0)) +
  scale_y_continuous(limits=rngs[[2]], expand=c(0,0))

gives me enter image description here

A lot easier and clearer than starting to mix colours in some additive or subtractive fashion anyway (which is the part where I still had trouble, and which apparently is not so trivial to do well).

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