39

Microsoft Windows 10 comes with a Microsoft Print To PDF printer which can print something to a PDF file. It prompts for the filename to download.

How can I programmatically control this from C# to not prompt for the PDF filename but save to a specific filename in some folder that I provide?

This is for batch processing of printing a lot of documents or other types of files to a PDF programmatically.

  • posted a working solution for you. let me know what you think :) – Kraang Prime Apr 7 '16 at 2:26
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    How simple and immense helpful it would be, if such kind of option (Auto-name feature) would be provided by Microsoft out of the box in their software. – Kai Noack Nov 6 '16 at 16:50
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To print a PrintDocument object using the Microsoft Print to PDF printer without prompting for a filename, here is the pure code way to do this:

// generate a file name as the current date/time in unix timestamp format
string file = (string)(DateTime.UtcNow.Subtract(new DateTime(1970, 1, 1))).TotalSeconds.ToString();

// the directory to store the output.
string directory = Environment.GetFolderPath(Environment.SpecialFolder.MyDocuments);

// initialize PrintDocument object
PrintDocument doc = new PrintDocument() {
    PrinterSettings = new PrinterSettings() {
        // set the printer to 'Microsoft Print to PDF'
        PrinterName = "Microsoft Print to PDF",

        // tell the object this document will print to file
        PrintToFile = true,

        // set the filename to whatever you like (full path)
        PrintFileName = Path.Combine(directory, file + ".pdf"),
    }
};

doc.Print();

You can also use this method for other Save as File type methods such as Microsoft XPS Printer

  • 2
    How can I use this to print an existing PDF anew with Microsoft Print To PDF, e.g. to "bake" annotations inside the PDF? – clocktown Jun 18 '17 at 23:37
  • Can something similar be done with Visual C++? – Andrew Truckle Jul 25 '17 at 8:58
  • @AndrewTruckle - The principle would be the same. Select the PDF virtual printer, then print to it as normal, although I would imagine in C++ there are likely better ways to achieve the same task. While the above code works, I do find it rather slow. – Kraang Prime Oct 11 '17 at 10:05
  • @KraangPrime How can I use this approach to convert a docx file to pdf? I don' t know if it is even possible but i am able to drag docx file to Microsoft print to PDF printer' s spool to save it as pdf manually. Can i do this programmatically using your approach(and without seeing save as dialog of course)? – Alpay Feb 26 '18 at 6:30
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    @KraangPrime, I used this approach. It has given a file, but I could not open it as Adobe Reader says the file is damaged. But if I don't use PrinterSettings, then it will pop up for browsing the destination location and file name, then I can access the file. Am I missing anything..? – user3157132 May 29 '18 at 13:39
2

You can print to the Windows 10 PDF printer, by using the PrintOut method and specifying the fourth output file name parameter, as in the following example:

/// <summary>
/// Convert a file to PDF using office _Document object
/// </summary>
/// <param name="InputFile">Full path and filename with extension of the file you want to convert from</param>
/// <returns></returns>
public void PrintFile(string InputFile)
{
    // convert input filename to new pdf name
    object OutputFileName = Path.Combine(
        Path.GetDirectoryName(InputFile),
        Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(InputFile)+".pdf"
    );


    // Set an object so there is less typing for values not needed
    object missing = System.Reflection.Missing.Value;

    // `doc` is of type `_Document`
    doc.PrintOut(
        ref missing,    // Background
        ref missing,    // Append
        ref missing,    // Range
        OutputFileName, // OutputFileName
        ref missing,    // From
        ref missing,    // To
        ref missing,    // Item
        ref missing,    // Copies
        ref missing,    // Pages
        ref missing,    // PageType
        ref missing,    // PrintToFile
        ref missing,    // Collate
        ref missing,    // ActivePrinterMacGX
        ref missing,    // ManualDuplexPrint
        ref missing,    // PrintZoomColumn
        ref missing,    // PrintZoomRow
        ref missing,    // PrintZoomPaperWidth
        ref missing,    // PrintZoomPaperHeight
    );
}

The OutputFile is a full path string of the input document you would like to convert, and the doc is a regular document object. For more info about the doc please see the following MSDN links for _Document.PrintOut()

The PrintOut in the example results a silent print, when you print through the specified inputFile to the OutputFileName, which will be placed in the same folder as the original document, but it will be in PDF format with the .pdf extension.

  • 4
    There's no indication in the question that the poster is using an Office product. – Ken White Apr 5 '16 at 16:59
  • @KenWhite, it was only through research, and the original link that I discovered this. Updated it by adding the current link, and reformatting some of the code so it is readily understood without having to go to the link(s). links are supplied for reference only. – Kraang Prime Apr 5 '16 at 17:01
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    @SanuelJackson: I didn't say anything about the links or your edit. My point is that this entire answer is based on the premise that the OP is using Word or Excel or automation, and there is zero indication in the question that that is the case. – Ken White Apr 5 '16 at 17:04
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    @KenWhite - ya, I noticed. Just posted a solution which addresses the OP's question since I was in the area anyway :) . Cleaned it up anyway as it wasn't clear in the answer that it was an Office solution to a non-office question. Since it was still c# related, and it does work, felt it could be preserved but needed a bit of love to clean it up and make it clear it is for office. :) – Kraang Prime Apr 5 '16 at 17:09
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    Microsoft.Office.Tools.Word.Document.PrintOut docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/… – Stefan Steiger Nov 9 '18 at 13:20

protected by Community Aug 14 '18 at 7:03

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