128

1. Print a-n: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n

2. Every second in a-n: a c e g i k m

3. Append a-n to index of urls{hello.com/, hej.com/, ..., hallo.com/}: hello.com/a hej.com/b ... hallo.com/n

2
  • 6
    Odd that to a "beginner" question you can still get a variety of answers. The fact that I can type does not mean that I can "python", I really like gnibbler's answer over for-messy-things. Thanks everyone for your answers and -- keep things simple, special thanks to gnibbler. – hhh Dec 23 '10 at 2:06
  • 2
    It's not a wild variety of answers. It's two varieties. One use range and chr() and another the ready made lists in string, which many people wouldn't think of. – Lennart Regebro Dec 25 '10 at 8:45

18 Answers 18

208
>>> import string
>>> string.ascii_lowercase[:14]
'abcdefghijklmn'
>>> string.ascii_lowercase[:14:2]
'acegikm'

To do the urls, you could use something like this

[i + j for i, j in zip(list_of_urls, string.ascii_lowercase[:14])]
3
  • 1
    I believe string.ascii_lowercase already worked in python 2.x, so to be sure just always use ascii_lowercase. – johk95 Aug 23 '17 at 11:32
  • 1
    @johk95, actually str.lowercase is locale dependent so wasn't the best choice in the first place. I've replaced it in my answer – John La Rooy Aug 23 '17 at 22:23
  • Hi, would be able to tell me whether is this only available in English? cant I get the same for other languages as well? Thanks & Best Regards – Michael Schroter Apr 13 '20 at 6:17
54

Assuming this is a homework ;-) - no need to summon libraries etc - it probably expect you to use range() with chr/ord, like so:

for i in range(ord('a'), ord('n')+1):
    print chr(i),

For the rest, just play a bit more with the range()

23

Hints:

import string
print string.ascii_lowercase

and

for i in xrange(0, 10, 2):
    print i

and

"hello{0}, world!".format('z')
18
for one in range(97,110):
    print chr(one)
12

Get a list with the desired values

small_letters = map(chr, range(ord('a'), ord('z')+1))
big_letters = map(chr, range(ord('A'), ord('Z')+1))
digits = map(chr, range(ord('0'), ord('9')+1))

or

import string
string.letters
string.uppercase
string.digits

This solution uses the ASCII table. ord gets the ascii value from a character and chr vice versa.

Apply what you know about lists

>>> small_letters = map(chr, range(ord('a'), ord('z')+1))

>>> an = small_letters[0:(ord('n')-ord('a')+1)]
>>> print(" ".join(an))
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n

>>> print(" ".join(small_letters[0::2]))
a c e g i k m o q s u w y

>>> s = small_letters[0:(ord('n')-ord('a')+1):2]
>>> print(" ".join(s))
a c e g i k m

>>> urls = ["hello.com/", "hej.com/", "hallo.com/"]
>>> print([x + y for x, y in zip(urls, an)])
['hello.com/a', 'hej.com/b', 'hallo.com/c']
1
  • It looks like string.letters was removed in Python 3 and only string.ascii_letters, not exactly the same, is available – jonespm Feb 7 '19 at 17:50
9
import string
print list(string.ascii_lowercase)
# ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'i', 'j', 'k', 'l', 'm', 'n', 'o', 'p', 'q', 'r', 's', 't', 'u', 'v', 'w', 'x', 'y', 'z']
1
  • 1
    To make this a tuple (which is immutable) in Python 3: tuple(string.ascii_lowercase) – Alex Willison May 16 '17 at 13:29
7
import string
print list(string.ascii_lowercase)
# ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'i', 'j', 'k', 'l', 'm', 'n', 'o', 'p', 'q', 'r', 's', 't', 'u', 'v', 'w', 'x', 'y', 'z']

and

for c in list(string.ascii_lowercase)[:5]:
    ...operation with the first 5 characters
5
myList = [chr(chNum) for chNum in list(range(ord('a'),ord('z')+1))]
print(myList)

Output

['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'i', 'j', 'k', 'l', 'm', 'n', 'o', 'p', 'q', 'r', 's', 't', 'u', 'v', 'w', 'x', 'y', 'z']
2
  • Welcome to StackOverflow. Try to explain more clearly why this is a complete answer to the question. – Jeroen Heier Sep 6 '19 at 11:11
  • Thanks. I like it how you build this. – hmacias Apr 7 '20 at 1:57
2
#1)
print " ".join(map(chr, range(ord('a'),ord('n')+1)))

#2)
print " ".join(map(chr, range(ord('a'),ord('n')+1,2)))

#3)
urls = ["hello.com/", "hej.com/", "hallo.com/"]
an = map(chr, range(ord('a'),ord('n')+1))
print [ x + y for x,y in zip(urls, an)]
2

The answer to this question is simple, just make a list called ABC like so:

ABC = ['abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz']

And whenever you need to refer to it, just do:

print ABC[0:9] #prints abcdefghij
print ABC       #prints abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
for x in range(0,25):
    if x % 2 == 0:
        print ABC[x] #prints acegikmoqsuwy (all odd numbered letters)

Also try this to break ur device :D

##Try this and call it AlphabetSoup.py:

ABC = ['abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz']


try:
    while True:
        for a in ABC:
            for b in ABC:
                for c in ABC:
                    for d in ABC:
                        for e in ABC:
                            for f in ABC:
                                print a, b, c, d, e, f, '    ',
except KeyboardInterrupt:
    pass
0
2

Try:

strng = ""
for i in range(97,123):
    strng = strng + chr(i)
print(strng)
0
2
import string

string.printable[10:36]
# abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
    
string.printable[10:62]
# abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
1

This is your 2nd question: string.lowercase[ord('a')-97:ord('n')-97:2] because 97==ord('a') -- if you want to learn a bit you should figure out the rest yourself ;-)

1
list(string.ascii_lowercase)

['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'i', 'j', 'k', 'l', 'm', 'n', 'o', 'p', 'q', 'r', 's', 't', 'u', 'v', 'w', 'x', 'y', 'z']
1

I hope this helps:

import string

alphas = list(string.ascii_letters[:26])
for chr in alphas:
 print(chr)
0

About gnibbler's answer.

Zip -function, full explanation, returns a list of tuples, where the i-th tuple contains the i-th element from each of the argument sequences or iterables. [...] construct is called list comprehension, very cool feature!

0

Another way to do it

  import string
  pass

  aalist = list(string.ascii_lowercase)
  aaurls = ['alpha.com','bravo.com','chrly.com','delta.com',]
  iilen  =  aaurls.__len__()
  pass

  ans01 = "".join( (aalist[0:14]) )
  ans02 = "".join( (aalist[0:14:2]) )
  ans03 = "".join( "{vurl}/{vl}\n".format(vl=vjj[1],vurl=aaurls[vjj[0] % iilen]) for vjj in enumerate(aalist[0:14]) )
  pass

  print(ans01)
  print(ans02)
  print(ans03)
  pass

Result

abcdefghijklmn
acegikm
alpha.com/a
bravo.com/b
chrly.com/c
delta.com/d
alpha.com/e
bravo.com/f
chrly.com/g
delta.com/h
alpha.com/i
bravo.com/j
chrly.com/k
delta.com/l
alpha.com/m
bravo.com/n

How this differs from the other replies

  • iterate over an arbitrary number of base urls
  • cycle through the urls and do not stop until we run out of letters
  • use enumerate in conjunction with list comprehension and str.format
0
# Assign the range of characters
first_char_start = 'a'
last_char = 'n'

# Generate a list of assigned characters (here from 'a' to 'n')
alpha_list = [chr(i) for i in range(ord(first_char), ord(last_char) + 1)]

# Print a-n with spaces: a b c d e f g h i j k l m n
print(" ".join(alpha_list))

# Every second in a-n: a c e g i k m
print(" ".join(alpha_list[::2]))

# Append a-n to index of urls{hello.com/, hej.com/, ..., hallo.com/}
# Ex.hello.com/a hej.com/b ... hallo.com/n

#urls: list of urls
results = [i+j for i, j in zip(urls, alpha_list)]

#print new url list 'results' (concatenated two lists element-wise)
print(results)

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