23

Why can I do this:

constexpr auto i_can() {
   int a = 8;
   a = 9;
   //...
}

But I cannot do this:

constexpr auto i_cannot() {
    std::array<int, 10> arr{};
    //I cannot
    arr[5] = 9;
}

My questions are:

  1. If I can mutate an int, why can I not mutate an int that is inside the array?
  2. Is this a language limitation (C++14) or a standard library spec problem? reference std::array<T, N>::operator[](size_t) is not currently constexpr.
1

2 Answers 2

17

Modification of objects inside constexpr functions has been introduced with C++14. However, while modifying e.g. a scalar by an assignment is fine, modifying a class object through a member function still needs that member function to be constexpr. And unfortunately, as you mentioned, the current std::array specification does not declare the non-const operator[] as constexpr.
Hence, §7.1.5/5 makes your definition ill-formed:

For a non-template, non-defaulted constexpr function […], if no argument values exist such that an invocation of the function […] could be an evaluated subexpression of a core constant expression (5.20), […], the program is ill-formed; no diagnostic required.

You can temporarily use a more modern implementation if you want full constexpr-ness. E.g. Constainer::Array.

3
  • so it happens the same with bitset :( Aug 9, 2015 at 11:01
  • 2
    @GermánDiago Well, use Constainer::Bitset :-P
    – Columbo
    Aug 9, 2015 at 11:03
  • 2
    Just an observation, "constainer" is actually the name of the library Columbo refers to, and not a misspelling.
    – Ben Voigt
    Dec 14, 2015 at 17:25
16

It is a limitation of the standard library since you can modify a plain C array in a constexpr:

#include <iostream>

constexpr auto demo()
{
   int arr[10] = {};
   arr[5] = 9;
   return arr[5];
}

int main()
{
    static_assert(demo() == 9, "");
    std::cout << demo() << std::endl;
    return 0;
}   

DEMO

output

9

If you added constexpr to operator[] of an implementation of array, you could also use this operator inside a constexpr.

DEMO

5
  • 2
    Is this a guess or an answer?
    – Shoe
    Aug 9, 2015 at 10:34
  • Your code does not prove that demo is producing a constant expression when called. You'd have to write e.g. static_assert(demo() == 9, ""); to be sure.
    – Columbo
    Aug 9, 2015 at 14:19
  • @Columbo thanks for the hint, I added the static_assert
    – m.s.
    Aug 9, 2015 at 14:32
  • 1
    @ʎǝɹɟɟɟǝſ I guess this is an answer :)
    – m.s.
    Aug 9, 2015 at 14:32
  • 1
    @m.s. How do you know that?
    – Shoe
    Aug 9, 2015 at 15:09

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