9

In the terminal, I executed a main parent process which will fork a child process. In both the parent and child processes I implemented a SIGINT signal handler. So when I press "ctrl+c", will both the handlers be called at the same time? Or do I need to call the child process's signal handler explicitly in the parent process's handler?

I looked up this post: How does Ctrl-C terminate a child process? which says that "The SIGINT signal is generated by the terminal line discipline, and broadcast to all processes in the terminal's foreground process group". I just didn't quite understand what does "foreground process group" means.

Thanks,

1
9

In both the parent and child processes I implemented a SIGINT signal handler. So when I press "ctrl+c", will both the handlers be called at the same time?

Yes, they both will receive SIGINT.

Or do I need to call the child process's signal handler explicitly in the parent process's handler?

"Calling" another process' signal handler doesn't make sense. If the both the process have a handler installed then they will be called once they receive the signal SIGINT.

I just didn't quite understand what does "foreground process group" means.

Typically, a process associated with a controlling terminal is foreground process and its process group is called foreground process group. When you start a process from the command line, it's a foreground process:

E.g.

$ ./script.sh # foreground process
$ ./script & # background process

I suggest you read about tty and The TTY demystified for a detailed explanation.

2

setpgid POSIX C process group minimal example

This illustrates how the signal does get sent to the child, if the child didn't change its process group with setpgid.

main.c

#define _XOPEN_SOURCE 700
#include <assert.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <stdbool.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>

volatile sig_atomic_t is_child = 0;

void signal_handler(int sig) {
    char parent_str[] = "sigint parent\n";
    char child_str[] = "sigint child\n";
    signal(sig, signal_handler);
    if (sig == SIGINT) {
        if (is_child) {
            write(STDOUT_FILENO, child_str, sizeof(child_str) - 1);
        } else {
            write(STDOUT_FILENO, parent_str, sizeof(parent_str) - 1);
        }
    }
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    pid_t pid, pgid;

    (void)argv;
    signal(SIGINT, signal_handler);
    signal(SIGUSR1, signal_handler);
    pid = fork();
    assert(pid != -1);
    if (pid == 0) {
        /* Change the pgid.
         * The new one is guaranteed to be different than the previous, which was equal to the parent's,
         * because `man setpgid` says:
         * > the child has its own unique process ID, and this PID does not match
         * > the ID of any existing process group (setpgid(2)) or session.
         */
        is_child = 1;
        if (argc > 1) {
            setpgid(0, 0);
        }
        printf("child pid, pgid = %ju, %ju\n", (uintmax_t)getpid(), (uintmax_t)getpgid(0));
        assert(kill(getppid(), SIGUSR1) == 0);
        while (1);
        exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
    }
    /* Wait until the child sends a SIGUSR1. */
    pause();
    pgid = getpgid(0);
    printf("parent pid, pgid = %ju, %ju\n", (uintmax_t)getpid(), (uintmax_t)pgid);
    /* man kill explains that negative first argument means to send a signal to a process group. */
    kill(-pgid, SIGINT);
    while (1);
}

GitHub upstream.

Compile with:

gcc -ggdb3 -O0 -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra -Wpedantic -o setpgid setpgid.c

Run without setpgid

Without any CLI arguments, setpgid is not done:

./setpgid

Possible outcome:

child pid, pgid = 28250, 28249
parent pid, pgid = 28249, 28249
sigint parent
sigint child

and the program hangs.

As we can see, the pgid of both processes is the same, as it gets inherited across fork.

Then whenever you hit:

Ctrl + C

It outputs again:

sigint parent
sigint child

This shows how:

  • to send a signal to an entire process group with kill(-pgid, SIGINT)
  • Ctrl + C on the terminal sends a kill to the entire process group by default

Quit the program by sending a different signal to both processes, e.g. SIGQUIT with Ctrl + \.

Run with setpgid

If you run with an argument, e.g.:

./setpgid 1

then the child changes its pgid, and now only a single sigint gets printed every time from the parent only:

child pid, pgid = 16470, 16470
parent pid, pgid = 16469, 16469
sigint parent

And now, whenever you hit:

Ctrl + C

only the parent receives the signal as well:

sigint parent

You can still kill the parent as before with a SIGQUIT:

Ctrl + \

however the child now has a different PGID, and does not receive that signal! This can seen from:

ps aux | grep setpgid

You will have to kill it explicitly with:

kill -9 16470

This makes it clear why signal groups exist: otherwise we would get a bunch of processes left over to be cleaned manually all the time.

Tested on Ubuntu 18.04.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.