2

I saw this example in a lua lesson:

function fromto(a, b)
  return
    function(state, seed)
      if (seed >= state) then return nil
      else return seed+1 end
    end, b, a-1
end

It returns succeeding integer values from a to b, inclusive. So I tried to apply the same logic by writing the following table iterator:

function values(t) -- t is a table
  return
    function(state, seed)
      return state[seed+1]
    end, t, 0
end

It returns the first value correctly, but then it throws an error saying that I can't do arithmetics in a string value (seed). But isn't seed receiving the value 0, which is an integer? What is happening?

Since there isn't an incrementation process on the first example (like a = a + 1), my thought is that lua may handle it backstage... but if it doesn't, maybe this is the cause of my confusion.

2
  • 2
    for in Lua generates sequence of values f(s,v0), f(s,f(s,v0)), f(s,f(s,f(s,v0))) and so on. Your s = t, v0=0 Aug 9 '15 at 19:14
  • I wasn't aware of that, thank you for the quick response @EgorSkriptunoff
    – xVictor
    Aug 9 '15 at 22:35
2

Read this.

seed is a bad name for the second parameter of your iterator function. It's actually the control variable. You "seed" it when you return 0 from values, but after that its value changes during the loop: it takes on the first value returned from your iterator function.

You returned a string from your iterator (return state[seed+1]), so the next time your iterator function was called, it was passed that string. You tried to do math on it, and... blam.

The generic for takes three parameters: an iterator function, an invariant state, and an initial control value. The iterator is called with the state and the control value. The iterator then returns the next control value, or nil to indicate that iteration is done.

t = {"foo","bar","zip","zap"}

local function iteratorFunction (state, index)
  index = index + 1
  local val = state[index]
  if val == nil then return nil end
  return index, val
end

for k, v in iteratorFunction, t, 0 do
    print(k,v)
end

So the first call to iteratorFunction receives t and 0 as parameters. The next call to iteratorFunction gets t and the first value returned from iteratorFunction, so on and so forth.

When you write a "generator" function like values, you're just returning the three initial values required by the generic for loop so that your code is more succinct when using that iterator:

function values(t)
    local function iteratorFunction (state, index)
      index = index + 1
      local val = state[index]
      if val == nil then return nil end
      return index, val
    end
    return iteratorFunction, t, 0 -- the same three values used in the for loop above
end

for k, v in values(t) do
    print(k,v)
end

The only required parameter to generic for is the iterator function. The invariant state and control variable can be nil, which you might do if your iteration logic is done in a closure:

function values(t)
    local index = 0
    -- our iterator function is a closure bound to `index` and `t`
    local function iteratorFunction()
      index = index + 1
      local val = t[index]
      if val == nil then return nil end
      return index, val
    end
    return iteratorFunction, t, 0 -- the same three values used in the for loop above
end

for k, v in values(t) do
    print(k,v)
end

If you change return index, val to just return val, values(t) will now iterate over only the values in t. We couldn't do that before because we needed to return a control variable for the next loop iteration. With the closure, we maintain the control variable via a variable bound to the closure (aka "upvalue").

3
  • 1) Don't put index global, it can be local to be an upvalue of the iterator function, so being on the stack and not an expensive request on the environment table. Without an upvalue, your iteration function isn't even a closure. 2) Don't check not val because false as table value would end the iterator too. 3) The question asked for values, not indices additionally.
    – Youka
    Aug 9 '15 at 20:32
  • 1) It would still be a closure because of t. Obviously the intent was for index to be an upvalue, too (see comment: "closure bound to index and t") but I forgot to make it local when wrapping it in a generator (it was local before by virtue of being a function param). 2) Correct. Fixed. 3) Impossible to do without a closure which distracts from showing him how he got the generic for wrong. Trivial to do with a closure, but I wanted the closure example I gave to implement the same functionality as the previous iterator, for instruction's sake. I added at the end about that.
    – Mud
    Aug 9 '15 at 21:02
  • 1) Right, forgot t, sorry. 2) Not entirely fixed (see last snippet). You can even put the final return in the if condition (just return when val != nil -> simply no return when val == nil).
    – Youka
    Aug 9 '15 at 21:03
1

You could use another form of iterators with closures:

local function values(t)
    local i = 0
    return function()
        i = i + 1
        return t[i]
    end
end

for x in values({1, 2, 3}) do
    print(x)
end

1 2 3

An iterator continues until nil is returned. An invalid table field (behind last) is always nil, so you just have to keep going.

The form with passing counter values in your example uses the return value to update the last counter value and isn't used usually. You update seed with your table entry which is a string, so the next pass has to fail.

Btw.: your values function does the same as ipairs.

2
  • This does nothing to explain why the OP's error is occurring.
    – Mud
    Aug 9 '15 at 21:11
  • Surely it does. The form with passing counter values in your example uses the return value to update the last counter value I expect the questioner can think so far when looking on his code.
    – Youka
    Aug 9 '15 at 21:19

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