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After trying to solve an one little task I was a bit confused by the strange behavior of the console.log function. I expected that console.log will use the valueOf function as a converter of the object to the primitive value. But I was wrong...

It's better to explain with an example.

Number.prototype.sum = function sum(val) {
    var newVal = this + val;
    var f = sum.bind(newVal);
    f.valueOf = f.toString = function () {
        return newVal;
    };
    return f;
};

var numb = 50;
var res = numb.sum(10)(2)(2);
console.log(res);
alert(res);

I expected get the 64 in both of alert and console.log. But it's works only for alert as you can see at jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/3yhrnrnL/

In the case of console.log I always getting something like "function b()" instead of 64. Can someone explain me why it happens and how to fix it? Thanks!

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  • 3
    That's how console.log works.
    – zerkms
    Commented Aug 10, 2015 at 0:00
  • 3
    alert accepts a string and will convert its argument to a string if it doesn’t get one. console.log accepts any object and inspects it intelligently.
    – Ry-
    Commented Aug 10, 2015 at 0:02
  • @minitech Can I affect to the console.log and output 64 instead of "function b()" without redefinition of console.log?
    – eterey
    Commented Aug 10, 2015 at 0:04
  • 2
    Neither alert or console.log are covered by a specification (ECMA-262 doesn't define any input or output), so you get what you get. While alert is reasonably consistent, console.log is very much implementation dependent.
    – RobG
    Commented Aug 10, 2015 at 0:04
  • 1
    @uzumaxy: You can use console.log('%d', res);. That’s not really the same thing, though. Why not convert it manually in any other way if that’s acceptable, or stop overriding valueOf and just get a property specifically when you want the result?
    – Ry-
    Commented Aug 10, 2015 at 0:11

1 Answer 1

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The javascript alert expects a string and if it isn't provided a string it will attempt to convert that value into a string.

To get your console.log to work you can simply use the parseInt() function like so

Number.prototype.sum = function sum(val) {
    var newVal = this + val;
    var f = sum.bind(newVal);
    f.valueOf = f.toString = function () {
        return newVal;
    };
    return f;
};

var numb = 50;
var res = numb.sum(10)(2)(2);
console.log(parseInt(res));
alert(res);
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