14

Some of us prefer to code in an exception-light style. However, if you wait for a Task Parallel Library task, and the task threw an exception, it will throw an exception on the calling thread as well. Is there a (preferably standard) way to avoid this behaviour and just check the response for exceptions when you get it back?

3
  • So basically you are asking if some code threw an exception, is there any way to detect it without catching it? Commented Aug 10, 2015 at 11:01
  • Are you absolutly certain you need to wait for the task? I would recommend you .ContinueWith(...) whatever you did after the Wait call. Commented Aug 10, 2015 at 11:18
  • 2
    This is an instance where you should be using continuations to interrogate the status of the antecedent task. Continuation are fundamental to TPL. Avoid hacking around them. More to the point, swallowing exceptions is a code smell.
    – Gusdor
    Commented Aug 10, 2015 at 11:47

5 Answers 5

20

You can use Task.WaitAny like:

        var task = Task.Run(() =>
        {
            // ...
            throw new Exception("Blah");
        });
        Task.WaitAny(task);
        if (task.IsFaulted)
        {
            var error = task.Exception;
            // ...
        }
        else if (task.IsCanceled)
        {
            // ...
        }
        else
        {
            // Success
        }
10

You can't wait on a faulted task without raising an exception. But you can wait on a continuation to that task, which will complete only after the original task completed without raising an exception:

public static Task SwallowExceptions(this Task task)
{
    return task.ContinueWith(_ => { });
}

faultedTask.SwallowExceptions().Wait();
if (faultedTask.IsFaulted)
{
    // handle exception
}

If your task returns a value, you can represent that in the extensions method and return the actual value if there were no exceptions or the default value if there were:

public static Task<T> SwallowExceptions<T>(this Task<T> task)
{
    return task.ContinueWith(completedTask => 
        completedTask.IsFaulted 
            ? default(T) 
            : completedTask.Result);
}
8

Unfortunately, this functionality is not built-in. Use this workaround:

 myTask.ContinueWith(_ => { }, TaskContinuationOptions.ExecuteSynchronously).Wait();

You can make this into an extension method.

4
  • 2
    Can you explain why this solution addresses the problem?
    – Gusdor
    Commented Aug 10, 2015 at 11:40
  • 3
    @Gusdor what do you mean? it does exactly what the OP wants. Waiting for a task without throwing an exception.
    – boot4life
    Commented Aug 10, 2015 at 11:46
  • 1
    Can you explain why you need to "TaskContinuationOptions.ExecuteSynchronously"? For me, it worked just as well without this parameter.
    – user74696c
    Commented Nov 13, 2020 at 9:11
  • @user74696c It's a performance optimization. It avoids submitting a new work item to the thread pool. Instead, it directly executes the empty delegate when myTask completes.
    – boot4life
    Commented Dec 4, 2020 at 19:11
2

Based on what you have written, might catching the exception and checking the IsFaulted property be your solution? IsFaulted

1
  • I went with the Task.WaitAny approach. To give you a context for why, the code being called was library code I couldn't change and was being called from outside of TPL, but exceptions were quite common and, whilst they needed to be handled, were an awful lot of noise to deal with if you slapped "break on exception" on, which I do all the time. Commented Mar 9, 2018 at 9:24
1

Catch the exception within the Task and return it in the result?

var task1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
{
    try
    {
        throw new MyCustomException("I'm bad, but not too bad!");
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        return new Result { Error = ex };
    }
});

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