4

Since simply overloading '=' in Perl does not act as one would expect, what is the proper way to do this?

Quote from overload perldoc:

Simple assignment is not overloadable (the '=' key is used for the Copy Constructor). Perl does have a way to make assignments to an object do whatever you want, but this involves using tie(), not overload - see tie and the COOKBOOK examples below.

I have read through the COOKBOOK and the documentation for tie and am having trouble figuring out how you could use it in this way.


I want to be able to create an object like so: my $object = Object->new() Then when I assign it to something I want it to do some special processing.

For example: $object = 3 would internally do something like $object->set_value(3);

I know this isn't necessarily good practice. This is more of an educational question. I just want to know how this can be done. Not whether it should be done.

7

You can't do that. You can add magic to a variable so that a sub is called after a value is assigned to the variable, but that's a far cry from what you asked.


Besides, what you asked doesn't really make sense. What should the following do?

my $object;
$object = Object->new();
$object = Object->new();
  • If it's not possible, then what does the documentation mean by this? "Perl does have a way to make assignments to an object do whatever you want, but this involves using tie(), not overload." – tjwrona1992 Aug 10 '15 at 15:23
  • 1
    tie more-or-less exposes magic to Perl code. You can tie a variable so that a sub is called after a value is assigned to the variable, but that's a far cry from what you asked. As I pointed out, what you asked doesn't really make any sense. – ikegami Aug 10 '15 at 15:26
  • The code you wrote above would create a new object with the first new call, then would set the value of that object to another instance of the object with the second call. – tjwrona1992 Aug 10 '15 at 15:38
  • The second call would work like $object->set_value(Object->new()) – tjwrona1992 Aug 10 '15 at 15:39
  • Not that that's useful, but i would assume that would be how it would work if it was set up that way. – tjwrona1992 Aug 10 '15 at 15:39
1

The perl documentation quoted above is somewhat poorly worded. There is no way to overload assignment into some storage location (i.e. variable) that currently contains some specific object or other; the current value of a variable is never important for assignment.

However, what you can do is add magic to that variable directly, that captures the attempt to store into it (SET magic, implemented by the STORE method of the tied class). But it is important to realise this is magic on the variable itself, and not the value that it currently contains.

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