72

Are there any command line utilities that can be used to find if two JSON files are identical with invariance to within-dictionary-key and within-list-element ordering?

Could this be done with jq or some other equivalent tool?

Examples:

These two JSON files are identical

A:

{
  "People": ["John", "Bryan"],
  "City": "Boston",
  "State": "MA"
}

B:

{
  "People": ["Bryan", "John"],
  "State": "MA",
  "City": "Boston"
}

but these two JSON files are different:

A:

{
  "People": ["John", "Bryan", "Carla"],
  "City": "Boston",
  "State": "MA"
}

C:

{
  "People": ["Bryan", "John"],
  "State": "MA",
  "City": "Boston"
}

That would be:

$ some_diff_command A.json B.json

$ some_diff_command A.json C.json
The files are not structurally identical
  • 7
    File A and file B are not identical. You interpret the value for the key People as a set, but it is a list and the ordering of the list cannot, in general, be assumed to be insignificant. Change People to Winners_by_ranking, and it immediately becomes fishy to claim that the files are identical. – Anthon Jan 13 '19 at 8:39
32

Since jq's comparison already compares objects without taking into account key ordering, all that's left is to sort all lists inside the object before comparing them. Assuming your two files are named a.json and b.json, on the latest jq nightly:

jq --argfile a a.json --argfile b b.json -n '($a | (.. | arrays) |= sort) as $a | ($b | (.. | arrays) |= sort) as $b | $a == $b'

This program should return "true" or "false" depending on whether or not the objects are equal using the definition of equality you ask for.

EDIT: The (.. | arrays) |= sort construct doesn't actually work as expected on some edge cases. This GitHub issue explains why and provides some alternatives, such as:

def post_recurse(f): def r: (f | select(. != null) | r), .; r; def post_recurse: post_recurse(.[]?); (post_recurse | arrays) |= sort

Applied to the jq invocation above:

jq --argfile a a.json --argfile b b.json -n 'def post_recurse(f): def r: (f | select(. != null) | r), .; r; def post_recurse: post_recurse(.[]?); ($a | (post_recurse | arrays) |= sort) as $a | ($b | (post_recurse | arrays) |= sort) as $b | $a == $b'
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I've been trying to change --argfile a a.json for --arg a $a (being $a a json string), with no luck. any idea how to approach strings, not files? – Simon Ernesto Cardenas Zarate Sep 24 '18 at 22:45
  • @SimonErnestoCardenasZarate if you are still having this problem, you may be wanting the --argjson argument instead – Brian Jul 19 '19 at 17:31
85

In principle, if you have access to bash or some other advanced shell, you could do something like

cmp <(jq -cS . A.json) <(jq -cS . B.json)

using subprocesses. This will format the json with sorted keys, and consistent representation of floating points. Those are the only two reasons I can think of for why json with the same content would be printed differently. Therefore doing a simple string comparison afterwards will results in a proper test. It's probably also worth noting that if you can't use bash you can get the same results with temporary files, it's just not as clean.

This doesn't quite answer your question, because in the way you stated the question you wanted ["John", "Bryan"] and ["Bryan", "John"] to compare identically. Since json doesn't have the concept of a set, only a list, those should be considered distinct. Order is important for lists. You would have to write some custom comparison if you wanted them to compare equally, and to do that you would need to define what you mean by equality. Does order matter for all lists or only some? What about duplicate elements? Alternatively if you want them to be represented as a set, and the elements are strings, you could put them in objects like {"John": null, "Bryan": null}. Order will not matter when comparing those for equality.

Update

From the comment discussion: If you want to get a better idea of why the the json isn't the same, then

diff <(jq -S . A.json) <(jq -S . B.json)

will produce more interpretable output. vimdiff might be preferable to diff depending on tastes.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Note that this seems to require version 1.5 or later of jq – Adam Baxter Aug 18 '16 at 5:31
  • 1
    @voltagex From looking at the online manual (stedolan.github.io/jq/manual/v1.4/#Invokingjq) It seems that it was actually added in 1.4, although I don't know if jq does posix style arguments so you may have to invoke jq -c -S ... – Erik Aug 18 '16 at 14:46
  • 4
    A cleaner, visual form IMO is vimdiff <(jq -S . a.json) <(jq -S . b.json) – Ashwin Jayaprakash Dec 8 '16 at 1:25
  • 1
    Yeah, you should remove the -c (which makes output compact), style preferences isn't relevant to your answer. – odinho - Velmont Jan 26 '17 at 9:06
  • @odinho-Velmont @Ashwin Jayaprakash It's true that the c isn't strictly necessary, but to me there's no reason for cmp to compare identical whitespace, and no reason for jq to bother emitting it. diff, vimdiff, or any tool that does file comparison will work, but cmp is all that's necessary. – Erik Jan 26 '17 at 17:45
17

Use jd with the -set option:

No output means no difference.

$ jd -set A.json B.json

Differences are shown as an @ path and + or -.

$ jd -set A.json C.json

@ ["People",{}]
+ "Carla"

The output diffs can also be used as patch files with the -p option.

$ jd -set -o patch A.json C.json; jd -set -p patch B.json

{"City":"Boston","People":["John","Carla","Bryan"],"State":"MA"}

https://github.com/josephburnett/jd#command-line-usage

| improve this answer | |
6

Here is a solution using the generic function walk/1:

# Apply f to composite entities recursively, and to atoms
def walk(f):
  . as $in
  | if type == "object" then
      reduce keys[] as $key
        ( {}; . + { ($key):  ($in[$key] | walk(f)) } ) | f
  elif type == "array" then map( walk(f) ) | f
  else f
  end;

def normalize: walk(if type == "array" then sort else . end);

# Test whether the input and argument are equivalent
# in the sense that ordering within lists is immaterial:
def equiv(x): normalize == (x | normalize);

Example:

{"a":[1,2,[3,4]]} | equiv( {"a": [[4,3], 2,1]} )

produces:

true

And wrapped up as a bash script:

#!/bin/bash

JQ=/usr/local/bin/jq
BN=$(basename $0)

function help {
  cat <<EOF

Syntax: $0 file1 file2

The two files are assumed each to contain one JSON entity.  This
script reports whether the two entities are equivalent in the sense
that their normalized values are equal, where normalization of all
component arrays is achieved by recursively sorting them, innermost first.

This script assumes that the jq of interest is $JQ if it exists and
otherwise that it is on the PATH.

EOF
  exit
}

if [ ! -x "$JQ" ] ; then JQ=jq ; fi

function die     { echo "$BN: $@" >&2 ; exit 1 ; }

if [ $# != 2 -o "$1" = -h  -o "$1" = --help ] ; then help ; exit ; fi

test -f "$1" || die "unable to find $1"
test -f "$2" || die "unable to find $2"

$JQ -r -n --argfile A "$1" --argfile B "$2" -f <(cat<<"EOF"
# Apply f to composite entities recursively, and to atoms
def walk(f):
  . as $in
  | if type == "object" then
      reduce keys[] as $key
        ( {}; . + { ($key):  ($in[$key] | walk(f)) } ) | f
  elif type == "array" then map( walk(f) ) | f
  else f
  end;

def normalize: walk(if type == "array" then sort else . end);

# Test whether the input and argument are equivalent
# in the sense that ordering within lists is immaterial:
def equiv(x): normalize == (x | normalize);

if $A | equiv($B) then empty else "\($A) is not equivalent to \($B)" end

EOF
)

POSTSCRIPT: walk/1 is a built-in in versions of jq > 1.5, and can therefore be omitted if your jq includes it, but there is no harm in including it redundantly in a jq script.

POST-POSTSCRIPT: The builtin version of walk has recently been changed so that it no longer sorts the keys within an object. Specifically, it uses keys_unsorted. For the task at hand, the version using keys should be used.

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  • 1
    Thank you for mentioning that walk was added in jq 1.5. I have been wishing for a compromise operator between filter and map and it looks like this is it. – Noah Sussman Aug 17 '17 at 16:26
5

There's an answer for this here that would be useful.

Essentially you can use the Git diff functionality (even for non-Git tracked files) which also includes colour in the output:

git diff --no-index payload_1.json payload_2.json

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  • 2
    This is sensitive to order, which the OP wanted to ignore – Andreas Dec 6 '19 at 14:36
1

Perhaps you could use this sort and diff tool: http://novicelab.org/jsonsortdiff/ which first sorts the objects semantically and then compares it. It is based on https://www.npmjs.com/package/jsonabc

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0

If you also want to see the differences, using @Erik's answer as inspiration and js-beautify:

$ echo '[{"name": "John", "age": 56}, {"name": "Mary", "age": 67}]' > file1.json
$ echo '[{"age": 56, "name": "John"}, {"name": "Mary", "age": 61}]' > file2.json

$ diff -u --color \
        <(jq -cS . file1.json | js-beautify -f -) \
        <(jq -cS . file2.json | js-beautify -f -)
--- /dev/fd/63  2016-10-18 13:03:59.397451598 +0200
+++ /dev/fd/62  2016-10-18 13:03:59.397451598 +0200
@@ -2,6 +2,6 @@
     "age": 56,
     "name": "John Smith"
 }, {
-    "age": 67,
+    "age": 61,
     "name": "Mary Stuart"
 }]
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  • 6
    ... or y'know just remove the -c from the jq command line. I dunno, prefer not introducing extra unnecessary tools ;) – odinho - Velmont Jan 26 '17 at 9:05
0

Pulling in the best from the top two answers to get a jq based json diff:

diff \
  <(jq -S 'def post_recurse(f): def r: (f | select(. != null) | r), .; r; def post_recurse: post_recurse(.[]?); (. | (post_recurse | arrays) |= sort)' "$original_json") \
  <(jq -S 'def post_recurse(f): def r: (f | select(. != null) | r), .; r; def post_recurse: post_recurse(.[]?); (. | (post_recurse | arrays) |= sort)' "$changed_json")

This takes the elegant array sorting solution from https://stackoverflow.com/a/31933234/538507 (which allows us to treat arrays as sets) and the clean bash redirection into diff from https://stackoverflow.com/a/37175540/538507 This addresses the case where you want a diff of two json files and the order of the array contents is not relevant.

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0

One more tool for those to which the previous answers are not a good fit, you can try jdd.

It's HTML based so you can either use it online at www.jsondiff.com or, if you prefer running it locally, just download the project and open the index.html.

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