7

Here is code that I hope explains what I want to achieve.

vector<int> ints;
vector<double> doubles;


struct Arg {
  enum Type {
    Int,
    Double
  };

  Type type;
  int index;
};

template <typename F> 
void Call(const F& f, const vector<Arg>& args) {
  // TODO: 
  //  - First assert that count and types or arguments of <f> agree with <args>.
  //  - Call "f(args)"
}

// Example:

void copy(int a, double& b) {
  b = a;
}

int test() {
  Call(copy, {{Int, 3}, {Double, 2}}); // copy(ints[3], double[2]);
}

Can this be done in C++11 ?
If yes, can the solution be simplified in C++14 ?

  • 2
    The pseudo-code indicates that you want some kind of "variant" type. For that look up Boost variant and others. The title indicates that you want something like an interface to a scripting language. For that, look up e.g. the Boost binding to Python, and not the least the Google binding to their Javascript engine. Other than these indications (which are not necessarily incompatible, but different) it's very unclear what you're asking. Perhaps you could sketch out your higher level goal. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Aug 11 '15 at 4:08
  • Since you are using const vector and adding type annotations wouldn't tuple be more appropriate? – West Aug 11 '15 at 4:31
  • Using those vectors as input is the intended use case? I'd guess you don't want to restrict yourself to only those two types? The answer is yes and yes, but it'll involve a lot of writing. – Daniel Jour Aug 11 '15 at 6:00
  • That's not dynamic call. – Ajay Aug 11 '15 at 6:36
  • Wait, you want to support more than 2 types? How do you want the link between types and vectors to be defined, if not through some kind of enumeration? – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Aug 14 '15 at 2:41
10
+500

I'd do this in two steps.

First, I'd wrap f in an object able to understand Arg-like parameters, and generate errors on failure. For simplicity, suppose we throw.

This is a bit simpler than your Arg to be understood at this layer, so I might translate Arg into MyArg:

struct MyArg {
  MyArg(MyArg const&)=default;
  MyArg(int* p):i(p){}
  MyArg(double* p):d(p){}
  MyArg(Arg a):MyArg(
    (a.type==Arg::Int)?
    MyArg(&ints.at(a.index)):
    MyArg(&doubles.at(a.index))
  ) {}
  int * i = nullptr;
  double* d = nullptr;
  operator int&(){ if (!i) throw std::invalid_argument(""); return *i; }
  operator double&(){ if (!d) throw std::invalid_argument(""); return *d; }
};

We map void(*)(Ts...) to std::function<void(MyArg, MyArg, MyArg)> like this:

template<class T0, class T1>using second_type = T1;

template<class...Ts>
std::function<void( second_type<Ts,MyArg>... )> // auto in C++14
my_wrap( void(*f)(Ts...) ) {
  return [f](second_type<Ts,MyArg>...args){
    f(args...);
  };
}

now all that is left is counting function parameter count vs vector size count, and unpacking the std::vector into a function call.

The last looks like:

template<class...Ts, size_t...Is>
void call( std::function<void(Ts...)> f, std::index_sequence<Is...>, std::vector<Arg> const& v ) {
  f( v[Is]... );
}
template<class...Ts>
void call( std::function<void(Ts...)> f, std::vector<Arg> const& v ) {
  call( std::move(f), std::index_sequence_for<Ts...>{}, v );
}

where index_sequence and index_sequence_for are C++14, but equivalents can be implemented in C++11 (there are many implementations on stack overflow).

So we end up with something like:

template<class...Ts>
void Call( void(*pf)(Ts...), std::vector<Arg> const& v ) {
  if (sizeof...(Ts)>v.size())
    throw std::invalid_argument("");
  auto f = my_wrap(pf);
  call( std::move(f), v );
}

Dealing with the throws is left as an exercise, as is handling return values.

This code has not been compiled or tested, but the design should be sound. It only supports calling function pointers -- calling generalized callable objects is tricky, because counting how many arguments they want (of type int or double) is tricky. If you passed in how many arguments they want as a compile-time constant, it is easy. You could also build a magic switch that handles counts up to some constant (10, 20, 1000, whatever), and dispatch the runtime length of the vector into a compile time constant that throws on a argument length mismatch.

This is trickier.


The hard coded pointers sort of suck.

template<class...Ts>struct types{using type=types;};
template<size_t I> using index=std::integral_constant<size_t, I>;
template<class T, class types> struct index_in;
template<class T, class...Ts>
struct index_in<T, types<T,Ts...>>:
  index<0>
{};
template<class T, class T0, class...Ts>
struct index_in<T, types<T0,Ts...>>:
  index<1+index_in<T, types<Ts...>>{}>
{};

is a package of types.

Here is how we can store buffers:

template<class types>
struct buffers;
template<class...Ts>
struct buffers<types<Ts...>> {
  struct raw_view {
    void* start = 0;
    size_t length = 0;
  };
  template<class T>
  struct view {
    T* start = 0;
    T* finish = 0;
    view(T* s, T* f):start(s), finish(f) {}
    size_t size() const { return finish-start; }
    T& operator[](size_t i)const{
      if (i > size()) throw std::invalid_argument("");
      return start[i];
    }
  }
  std::array< raw_view, sizeof...(Ts) > views;
  template<size_t I>
  using T = std::tuple_element_t< std::tuple<Ts...>, I >;
  template<class T>
  using I = index_of<T, types<Ts...> >;

  template<size_t I>
  view<T<I>> get_view() const {
    raw_view raw = views[I];
    if (raw.length==0) { return {0,0}; }
    return { static_cast<T<I>*>(raw.start), raw.length/sizeof(T) };
  }
  template<class T>
  view<T> get_view() const {
    return get_view< I<T>{} >();
  }
  template<class T>
  void set_view( view<T> v ) {
    raw_view raw{ v.start, v.finish-v.start };
    buffers[ I<T>{} ] = raw;
  }
};

now we modify Call:

template<class R, class...Args, size_t...Is, class types>
R internal_call( R(*f)(Args...), std::vector<size_t> const& indexes, buffers<types> const& views, std::index_sequence<Is...> ) {
  if (sizeof...(Args) != indexes.size()) throw std::invalid_argument("");
  return f( views.get_view<Args>()[indexes[Is]]... );
}
template<class R, class...Args, size_t...Is, class types>
R Call( R(*f)(Args...), std::vector<size_t> const& indexes, buffers<types> const& views ) {
  return internal_call( f, indexes, views, std::index_sequence_for<Args...>{} );
}

which is C++14, but most components can be translated to C++11.

This uses O(1) array lookups, no maps. You are responsible for populating buffers<types> with the buffers, sort of like this:

buffers<types<double, int>> bufs;
std::vector<double> d = {1.0, 3.14};
std::vector<int> i = {1,2,3};
bufs.set_view<int>( { i.data(), i.data()+i.size() } );
bufs.set_view<double>( { d.data(), d.data()+d.size() } );

parameter mismatch counts and index out of range generate thrown errors. It only works with raw function pointers -- making it work with anything with a fixed (non-template) signature is easy (like a std::function).

Making it work with an object with no signature is harder. Basically instead of relying on the function called for the arguments, you instead build the cross product of the types<Ts...> up to some fixed size. You build a (large) table of which of these are valid calls to the passed in call target (at compile time), then at run time walk that table and determine if the arguments passed in are valid to call the object with.

It gets messy.

This is why my above version simply asks for indexes, and deduces the types from the object being called.

  • Can you explain (or point to an explanation of) the need for the second_type thing? It looks like second_type<Ts,MyArg> should just be the same type as MyArg, so I must be missing something subtle. – Speed8ump Aug 18 '15 at 3:44
  • 1
    @Speed8ump I'm expanding second_type<Ts,MyArg>... -- imagine if Ts... is {int, double, char}, then second_type<Ts,MyArg>... is {second_type<int,MyArg>, second_type<double,MyArg>, second_type<char,MyArg>}, which is {MyArg, MyArg, MyArg} -- an equal number of MyArgs as sizeof...(Ts). ({} are just for illustration) – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Aug 18 '15 at 14:35
1

I have a partial solution, using C++11 grammar.

First I make a function overloader accepting arbitrator kinds of arguments

template< typename Function >
struct overloader : Function
{
    overloader( Function const& func ) : Function{ func } {}
    void operator()(...) const {}
};

template< typename Function >
overloader<Function> make_overloader( Function const& func )
{
    return overloader<Function>{ func };
}

then, using the overloader to deceive the compiler into believing the following code ( in switch-case block )is legal:

template <typename F>
void Call( F const& f, const vector<Arg>& args )
{
    struct converter
    {
        Arg const& arg;
        operator double&() const
        {
            assert( arg.type == Double );
            return doubles[arg.index];
        }
        operator int() const
        {
            assert( arg.type == Int );
            return ints[arg.index];
        }
        converter( Arg const& arg_ ): arg( arg_ ) {}
    };
    auto function_overloader = make_overloader( f );
    unsigned long const arg_length = args.size();
    switch (arg_length)
    {
        case 0 :
            function_overloader();
            break;
        case 1 :
            function_overloader( converter{args[0]} );
            break;
        case 2 :
            function_overloader( converter{args[0]}, converter{args[1]} );
            break;
        case 3 :
            function_overloader( converter{args[0]}, converter{args[1]}, converter{args[2]} );
            break;
        /*
        case 4 :
        .
        .
        .
        case 127 :
        */
    }
}

and test it this way:

void test_1()
{
    Call( []( int a, double& b ){ b = a; }, vector<Arg>{ Arg{Int, 3}, Arg{Double, 2} } );
}

void test_2()
{
    Call( []( double& b ){ b = 3.14; }, vector<Arg>{ Arg{Double, 0} } );
}

void my_copy( int a, double& b, double& c )
{
    b = a;
    c = a+a;
}

void test_3()
{
    //Call( my_copy, vector<Arg>{ Arg{Int, 4}, Arg{Double, 3}, Arg{Double, 1} } ); // -- this one does not work
    Call( []( int a, double& b, double& c ){ my_copy(a, b, c); }, vector<Arg>{ Arg{Int, 4}, Arg{Double, 3}, Arg{Double, 1} } );
}

the problems with this solution is:

  1. g++5.2 accept it, clang++6.1 doesn's
  2. when the argument(s) of function Call is/are not legal, it remains silent
  3. the first argument of function Call cannot be a C-style function, one must wrap that into a lambda object to make it work.

the code is available here - http://melpon.org/wandbox/permlink/CHZxVfLM92h1LACf -- for you to play with.

1

First of all, you need some mechanism to register your argument values that are later referenced by some type and an index:

class argument_registry
{
public:
    // register a range of arguments of type T
    template <class T, class Iterator>
    void register_range(Iterator begin, Iterator end)
    {
        // enclose the range in a argument_range object and put it in our map
        m_registry.emplace(typeid(T), std::make_unique<argument_range<T, Iterator>>(begin, end));
    }

    template <class T>
    const T& get_argument(size_t idx) const
    {
        // check if we have a registered range for this type
        auto itr = m_registry.find(typeid(T));
        if (itr == m_registry.end())
        {
            throw std::invalid_argument("no arguments registered for this type");
        }

        // we are certain about the type, so downcast the argument_range object and query the argument
        auto range = static_cast<const argument_range_base1<T>*>(itr->second.get());
        return range->get(idx);
    }

private:
    // base class so we can delete the range objects properly
    struct argument_range_base0
    {
        virtual ~argument_range_base0(){};
    };

    // interface for querying arguments
    template <class T>
    struct argument_range_base1 : argument_range_base0
    {
        virtual const T& get(size_t idx) const = 0;
    };

    // implements get by querying a registered range of arguments
    template <class T, class Iterator>
    struct argument_range : argument_range_base1<T>
    {
        argument_range(Iterator begin, Iterator end)
            : m_begin{ begin }, m_count{ size_t(std::distance(begin, end)) } {}

        const T& get(size_t idx) const override
        {
            if (idx >= m_count)
                throw std::invalid_argument("argument index out of bounds");

            auto it = m_begin;
            std::advance(it, idx);
            return *it;
        }

        Iterator m_begin;
        size_t m_count;
    };

    std::map<std::type_index, std::unique_ptr<argument_range_base0>> m_registry;
};

Than we define a small type to combine a type and a numerical index for referencing arguments:

typedef std::pair<std::type_index, size_t> argument_index;

// helper function for creating an argument_index
template <class T>
argument_index arg(size_t idx)
{
    return{ typeid(T), idx };
}

Finally, we need some template recursion to go through all expected arguments of a function, check if the user passed an argument of matching type and query it from the registry:

// helper trait for call function; called when there are unhandled arguments left
template <bool Done>
struct call_helper
{
    template <class FuncRet, class ArgTuple, size_t N, class F, class... ExpandedArgs>
    static FuncRet call(F func, const argument_registry& registry, const std::vector<argument_index>& args, ExpandedArgs&&... expanded_args)
    {
        // check if there are any arguments left in the passed vector
        if (N == args.size())
        {
            throw std::invalid_argument("not enough arguments");
        }

        // get the type of the Nth argument
        typedef typename std::tuple_element<N, ArgTuple>::type arg_type;

        // check if the type matches the argument_index from our vector
        if (std::type_index{ typeid(arg_type) } != args[N].first)
        {
            throw std::invalid_argument("argument of wrong type");
        }

        // query the argument from the registry
        auto& arg = registry.get_argument<arg_type>(args[N].second);

        // add the argument to the ExpandedArgs pack and continue the recursion with the next argument N + 1
        return call_helper<std::tuple_size<ArgTuple>::value == N + 1>::template call<FuncRet, ArgTuple, N + 1>(func, registry, args, std::forward<ExpandedArgs>(expanded_args)..., arg);
    }
};

// helper trait for call function; called when there are no arguments left
template <>
struct call_helper<true>
{
    template <class FuncRet, class ArgTuple, size_t N, class F, class... ExpandedArgs>
    static FuncRet call(F func, const argument_registry&, const std::vector<argument_index>& args, ExpandedArgs&&... expanded_args)
    {
        if (N != args.size())
        {
            // unexpected arguments in the vector
            throw std::invalid_argument("too many arguments");
        }

        // call the function with all the expanded arguments
        return func(std::forward<ExpandedArgs>(expanded_args)...);
    }
};

// call function can only work on "real", plain functions
// as you could never do dynamic overload resolution in C++
template <class Ret, class... Args>
Ret call(Ret(*func)(Args...), const argument_registry& registry, const std::vector<argument_index>& args)
{
    // put the argument types into a tuple for easier handling
    typedef std::tuple<Args...> arg_tuple;

    // start the call_helper recursion
    return call_helper<sizeof...(Args) == 0>::template call<Ret, arg_tuple, 0>(func, registry, args);
}

Now you can use it like this:

int foo(int i, const double& d, const char* str)
{
    printf("called foo with %d, %f, %s", i, d, str);
    // return something
    return 0;
}

int main()
{
    // prepare some arguments
    std::vector<int> ints = { 1, 2, 3 };
    std::vector<double> doubles = { 10., 20., 30. };
    std::vector<const char*> str = { "alpha", "bravo", "charlie" };

    // register them
    argument_registry registry;
    registry.register_range<int>(ints.begin(), ints.end());
    registry.register_range<double>(doubles.begin(), doubles.end());
    registry.register_range<const char*>(str.begin(), str.end());

    // call function foo with arguments from the registry
    return call(foo, registry, {arg<int>(2), arg<double>(0), arg<const char*>(1)});
}

Live example: http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/7350319f88d86c53

This design should be open for any argument type without the need to list all the supported types somewhere.

As noted in the code comments, you cannot call any callable object like this in general, because overload resolution could never be done at runtime in C++.

  • OP's example gets the arguments passed to call via non-compile-time-constant parameter. Yours takes it by compile-time-constant parameter (namely, type). And as it happens, it is actually possible to handle any callable object up to some fixed number of arguments, it is just impractical. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Aug 16 '15 at 1:20
  • @Yakk Writing arg<int>(2) is as compile-time-constant as {Int, 2}. The result-type of both expressions is a "abstract" type that stores type information, but the result-type of that expression itself does NOT depend on the parameter type, so it’s easy to handle just like the enum-based solution. But using the real type as a parameter for creating the type information instead of making up some identifier saves you from having to define a comprehensive list of all supported types somewhere. – Horstling Aug 18 '15 at 17:00
  • @Yakk It is also not possible to handle any callable object in general. Think of functors with templated or overloaded operator(). It's impossible to specialize / find the correct overload at runtime. Of course you can add support for some special cases like std::function-like objects, but as you say it becomes messy and would never be a general solution. – Horstling Aug 18 '15 at 17:00
  • You know the type of the callable at compile time. You know the set of possible arguments you can call it with at compile time. If you have a fixed max number of arguments you can deal with, you can build a run-time table that maps (given this set of arguments) to (either call it, or throw invalid argument exception) (either as a n-dimensional table, or a series of conditionals) at compile time. Then a lookup in this table solves the problem you say is not possible. this is what gets messy: solving the problem in (nearly) general (with a capped arg-count). – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Aug 18 '15 at 17:40
0

Instead of clarifying the question, as I requested, you have put it up for bounty. Except if that really is the question, i.e. a homework assignment with no use case, just exercising you on general basic programming, except for that only sheer luck will then give you an answer to your real question: people have to guess about what the problem to be solved, is. That's the reason why nobody's bothered, even with the bounty, to present a solution to the when-obvious-errors-are-corrected exceedingly trivial question that you literally pose, namely how to do exactly this:

vector<int> ints;
vector<double> doubles;


struct Arg {
  enum Type {
    Int,
    Double
  };

  Type type;
  int index;
};

template <typename F> 
void Call(const F& f, const vector<Arg>& args) {
  // TODO: 
  //  - First assert that count and types or arguments of <f> agree with <args>.
  //  - Call "f(args)"
}

// Example:

void copy(int a, double& b) {
  b = a;
}

int test() {
  Call(copy, {{Int, 3}, {Double, 2}}); // copy(ints[3], double[2]);
}

In C++11 and later one very direct way is this:

#include <assert.h>
#include <vector>
using std::vector;

namespace g {
    vector<int> ints;
    vector<double> doubles;
}

struct Arg {
  enum Type {
    Int,
    Double
  };

  Type type;
  int index;
};

template <typename F> 
void Call(const F& f, const vector<Arg>& args)
{
    // Was TODO: 
    //  - First assert that count and types or arguments of <f> agree with <args>.
    assert( args.size() == 2 );
    assert( args[0].type == Arg::Int );
    assert( int( g::ints.size() ) > args[0].index );
    assert( args[1].type == Arg::Double );
    assert( int( g::doubles.size() ) > args[1].index );

    //  - Call "f(args)"
    f( g::ints[args[0].index], g::doubles[args[1].index] );
}

// Example:

void copy(int a, double& b)
{
    b = a;
}

auto test()
{
    Call(copy, {{Arg::Int, 3}, {Arg::Double, 2}}); // copy(ints[3], double[2]);
}

namespace h {}

auto main()
    -> int
{
    g::ints = {000, 100, 200, 300};
    g::doubles = {1.62, 2.72, 3.14};
    test();
    assert( g::doubles[2] == 300 );
}

There are no particularly relevant new features in C++14.

0

I propose this answer following my comment on your question. Seeing that in the requirements, you stated:

Preferably we should not be required to create a struct that enumerates all the types we want to support.

It could suggests you would like to get rid of the type enumerator in your Arg structure. Then, only the value would be left: then why not using plain C++ types directly, instead of wrapping them ?

It assumes you then know all your argument types at compile time
(This assumption could be very wrong, but I did not see any requirement in your question preventing it. I would be glad to rewrite my answer if you give more details).

The C++11 variadic template solution

Now to the solution, using C++11 variadic templates and perfect forwarding. In a file Call.h:

template <class F, class... T_Args>
void Call(F f, T_Args &&... args)
{
    f(std::forward<T_Args>(args)...);
}

Solution properties

This approach seems to satisfy all your explicit requirements:

  • Works with C++11 standard
  • Checks that count and types or arguments of f agress with args.
    • It actually does that early, at compile time, instead of a possible runtime approach.
  • No need to manually enumerate the accepted types (actually works with any C++ type, be it native or user defined)

Not in your requirement, but nice to have:

  • Very compact, because it leverage a native features introduced in C++11.
  • Accepts any number of arguments
  • The type of the argument and the type of the corresponding f parameter do not have to match exactly, but have to be compatible (exactly like a plain C++ function call).

Example usage

You could test it in a simple main.cpp file:

#include "Call.h"
#include <iostream>

void copy(int a, double& b)
{
  b = a;
}

void main()
{
    int a = 5;
    double b = 6.2;

    std::cout << "b before: " << b << std::endl;
    Call(copy, a, b);
    std::cout << "b now: " << b << std::endl;
}

Which would print:

b before: 6.2
b now: 5

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