3

I am running a Perl script to control two other scripts. The user of the main program can call the two secondary scripts with the following line.

do 'Task_A.pl';

The script then runs Task_A.pl but I would like to find a way of then exiting Task_A.pl and return to the main program. If possible I would like to return to the function where I last called the secondary script. I am not sure as to what this is called but I appreciate any input for a possible solution.

This is the whole main program, not much to it at the moment.

my $selecion;

#Looping variables.
my $program_loop = 1;

while ($program_loop == 1)
{
    print "Please choose one of the programs listed in the menu.\n";

    #Program menu where the user chooses from the presented options.
    print "[1] - Script A.\n";
    print "[2] - Script B.\n";
    print "[3] - Exit program.\n";

    my $user_input = <>;

    if ($user_input == 1) # <-- Scrip_A.pl
    {
        do 'Task_A.pl';
    }
    elsif ($user_input == 2) # <-- Scrip_B.pl
    {
        do 'Task_B.pl';     
    }
    elsif ($user_input == 3) # <-- Exit Program
    {
        #The user can choose to exit from the menu.
        print "The program will now exit.\n";
        exit;
    }
}
  • 1
    Programmers don't die, they just GOSUB without RETURN. – simbabque Aug 11 '15 at 13:49
  • 2
    I think what you actually want to do is use function calls. do is most likely a terrible idea. Please show some more of the actual code. It's also not clear how the user (is that a programmer) of the main script would call a secondary script. – simbabque Aug 11 '15 at 13:49
  • I thought so too. Using do is probably not the best way to go about but I am not really sure what my options are here. – Majestic Pixel Aug 11 '15 at 13:55
  • 1
    If there is no shared memory/variables necessary, start a new process. Alternatively, refactor your two programs into modules that share the same interface and use those. This will be hard if there is a lot of global legacy stuff going on. As your program does not have use strict and use warnings, I will assume that is the case. Why are you doing this exactly? – simbabque Aug 11 '15 at 13:57
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    Generally speaking, you're doing something wrong if you use do. – ikegami Aug 11 '15 at 14:31
3

do does not start another process. If that's what you want, use "system()".

If you want do, then it's probably best to just put everything into a function in the file to be evaluated and call the function at the end of the file.

Use "return" to leave the function and return to next instruction after do.

  • I tried that but somehow the Task_A.pl program just exits without returning to the main program. – Majestic Pixel Aug 11 '15 at 13:50
  • 2
    You need to understand what do does. It's not a fork or a sub-process, it just slurps in the file and runs it in place. Over and over again, if you decide to do so. – simbabque Aug 11 '15 at 13:51
  • Yup, haven't used do in decades :-) – neuhaus Aug 11 '15 at 13:56
  • I use it with BLOCKs. But not with files. – simbabque Aug 11 '15 at 13:58
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    I think you can greatly improve the answer by formatting it a bit, linking to the perldoc for system and explaining why that works, with a small example. Note I have not downvoted it. – simbabque Aug 11 '15 at 14:07

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