2

Take List<Car>. Each Car has a unique index identifying it, say RegNumber and then another property describing it - say Color for example.

I want to

  1. check if the collection has a car with RegNumber 5
  2. if it does, change the color
  3. if it doesn't, add a new item for that car
  4. save the list

This is the way I am currently doing it and I'm asking if there is a better, more efficient way of doing this?

Car car = CarsForSale.Find(c => c.RegNumber == 5);

if (car != null)
{
   foreach (Car car in CarsForSale)
   {
      if (car.RegNumber == 5)
      {
         car.Color = "Red";
         break;
      }
   }
}
else
{
   CarsForSale.Add(new Car(5, "Red"));
}

Save(CarsForSale);

EDIT There are not multiple cars with the same reg - the RegNumber is unique as stated in the question.

This was really just a total dumb@ss moment here anyway that a code review would have spotted. Thanks for all the replies and for not mocking my clearly stoopid question. Of course the item/element returned from the collection is a reference so there is absolutely no need to iterate through the list again...time to go bang my head against a wall I think.

10
  • Is this homework? If so, tag it as such.
    – Håvard S
    Jul 7, 2010 at 12:19
  • Efficient as in...? Fast, low memory print, short execution path, minimal code? Jul 7, 2010 at 12:21
  • why are you iterating over all cars in this foreach loop? You already have the car with reg number == 5, no?
    – Grzenio
    Jul 7, 2010 at 12:23
  • You do not to modify the List<>. The Cars in the List<> are just references. If you modify the Car, then the change is also visible to the List<>.
    – codymanix
    Jul 7, 2010 at 12:35
  • @Havard - No it's not homework so it's not marked as so. The class names are just examples for the purpose of the code here. Jul 7, 2010 at 13:14

5 Answers 5

4

Well first off you don't need your test for car.RegNumber == 5 in the loop - you've already found the first car that match this criterion from your statement:

Car car = CarsForSale.Find(c => c.RegNumber == 5);

In fact your whole loop is redundant, you can just have:

if (car != null)
{
    car.Color = "Red";
}
else
{
    CarsForSale.Add(new Car(5, "Red"));
}

Unless you want to find all cars that have RegNumber equal to 5, in which case your first line is incorrect as that will only find the first car that matches the criteria. To find all the cars you want something along these lines:

var cars = CarsForSale.Where(c => c.RegNumber == 5);

foreach (Car car in cars)
{
    car.Color = "Red";
}

if (!car.Any())
{
    CarsForSale.Add(new Car(5, "Red"));
}

With your original code the compiler should have warned you that the redefinition of car in the loop would hide the original definition (the one I've quoted).

2
  • I don't think that's a Linq statement.
    – Dan Tao
    Jul 7, 2010 at 12:22
  • car.Count() == 0 is horrible way to test for no elements because if collection is not an ICollection<T> it will have to loop through all elements. Use !car.Any() instead which just checks the first elements existence. Jul 7, 2010 at 12:44
2

Why are you re-iterating through the list when you already have a result?

This will achieve the same outcome:

Car car = CarsForSale.Find(c => c.RegNumber == 5);
if (car != null)
{
   car.Color = "Red";
}
else
{
   CarsForSale.Add(new Car(5, "Red"));
}
Save(CarsForSale);

The result from the Find method of CarsForSale, if it returns a result, will be a reference type, which means any changes to car will change the item in CarsForSale as well. I'm guessing you thought that the result from Find would be disconnected from the actual item in CarsForSale, hence the unnecessary foreach loop?

0
2

Update

In response to this comment you've left on a couple of other answers:

What if there are several cars with the RegNumber of 5?

If it's possible for multiple cars to have the same RegNumber, then calling Find is not the right approach. Find is just enumerating over the list to find a match; you'd be better off skipping it and keeping your foreach loop.

You could, however, make your code more concise by using Where instead:

var matches = CarsForSale.Where(c => c.RegNumber == 5);
int numMatches = 0;

foreach (Car match in matches )
{
    match.Color = "Red";
    ++numMatches;
}
if (numMatches == 0)
{
   CarsForSale.Add(new Car(5, "Red"));
}

Original answer

That whole foreach loop is redundant: you're basically doing the same work you already did by calling Find.

So the code can be simplified:

Car car = CarsForSale.Find(c => c.RegNumber == 5);

if (car != null)
{
    car.Color = "Red";
}
else
{
   CarsForSale.Add(new Car(5, "Red"));
}

That said, if you're looking up cars in your List<Car> by RegNumber, it would make sense to use a Dictionary<int, Car> instead of a List<Car>:

Car car;
if (CarsForSale.TryGetValue(5, out car))
{
    car.Color = "Red";
}
else
{
    CarsForSale[5] = car = new Car(5, "Red");
}
2

Once you have the car you're looking for from the LINQ statement, there's no need to loop back through the collection to find the match:

Car car = CarsForSale.Where(c => c.RegNumber == 5).FirstOrDefault();

if(car != null)
{
    car.Color = "Red";
}
else
{
    CarsForSale.Add(new Car(5, "Red"));
}

Save(CarsForSale);

Or if there are going to be multiple Cars with the same RegNumber:

var cars = CarsForSale.Where(c => c.RegNumber == 5);

if(cars.Any())
{
    foreach(Car car in cars)
        car.Color = "Red";
}
else
{
    CarsForSale.Add(new Car(5, "Red"));
}

Save(CarsForSale);
5
  • 1
    FirstOrDefault() will take the first match only. Find() will do the same thing. Jul 7, 2010 at 12:25
  • Don't use Where followed by FirstOrDefault. FirstOrDefault has an overload that takes a filter. And anyways if CarsForSale is a List<Car>, using Find is better.
    – Trillian
    Jul 7, 2010 at 12:31
  • @Trillian - Even though you can pass a Predicate to FirstOrDefault, I like to keep them separate to clearly state intent and make it easier to modify in the future (even if marginally so). The two get evaluated the same so there's no performance difference. Also, why would List.Find() be any better (especially given the fact that he might need multiple matches)? Jul 7, 2010 at 12:36
  • Of course Find won't do if there are multiple matches. But for a single match, it is slightly better than FirstOrDefault because it's provided by the class itself and skips the overhead of using an enumerator. Ok, maybe I'm nitpicking :)
    – Trillian
    Jul 8, 2010 at 21:59
  • @Trillian My point was more that Find() (more than likely, I can't check at the moment) uses an enumerator anyway so I still don't see the extra overhead. Jul 8, 2010 at 22:19
1

So as Dan already mentioned, if you have a unique property you should use it as a key within a Dictionary<TKey, TValue>.

Cause checking if something is within a Dictionary is an O(1) operation, while within a List it is just O(n) in the worst case (and now imagine you have 1 million cars within your list).

var carsForSale = new Dictionary<int, Car>();

//Create a car which you like to check
var checkCar = new Car(4, Color.Red);

//Use this approach if you want to change only a few properties
//of an existing item
if (carsForSale.ContainsKey(checkCar.RegNum))
{
    carsForSale[checkCar.RegNum].Color = checkCar.Color;
}
else
{
    carsForSale[4] = checkCar;
}

//If you have to take over ALL property settings, you can also
//forget the old item and take the new one.
//The index operator is smart enough to just add a new one
//or to delete an old and add the new in one step.
carsForSale[checkCar.RegNum] = checkCar;

Dummy implementation of the car class:

public class Car
{
    public int RegNum { get; private set; }
    public Color Color { get; set; }

    public Car(int regNum)
        : this(regNum, Color.Empty)
    { }

    public Car(int regNum, Color color)
    {
        RegNum = regNum;
        Color = color;
    }
}

The problem why you are using a Dictionary is, cause you want to explicitly tell what the key is (the RegNum property of your car), but you could also use a Hashset<T> if your Car object would correctly implement Equals() and GetHashCode() but this is a little more complex than you might think. A good explanation can be found in the Essentials C# book.

2
  • Thanks Oliver, I take your point (and Dan's) on the Dictionary being more efficient. I hadn't thought of Hashset<T> so I'll look into that too and see if it applies in my case. Jul 7, 2010 at 15:26
  • Yes, a HashSet would also work, if two items with the same RegNumber would reveal the same HashCode.
    – Oliver
    Jul 8, 2010 at 6:12

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