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One of the requirements for Telegram Authentication is decomposing a given number into 2 prime co-factors. In particular P*Q = N, where N < 2^63

How can we find the smaller prime co-factor, such that P < square_root(N)

My Suggestions:

1) pre-compute primes from 3 to 2^31.5, then test if N mod P = 0

2) Find an algorithm to test for primes (but we still have to test N mod P =0)

Is there an algorithm for primes that is well suited to this case?

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  • 1
    Are you sure that is a requirement? The whole thing they describe looks like RSA in some sense, but with toy-length keys. In real RSA it is important that pq be so long, no publicly known algorithm exists to factor it in a reasonable amount of time. However, if you really want to factor semiprimes smaller than 2^63 (so in the realm of 18 digits long) Pollard Rho in C++ can do it in a few days on a PC. There are listings of Pollard Rho here on SO. The special number field sieve can do it in seconds. And it is too small to even bother using GNFS. Check out msieve. It should interest you. – WDS Aug 12 '15 at 2:22
  • @wds it is a requirement. i even linked to the section of their API page. – Charles Okwuagwu Aug 12 '15 at 5:24
  • @wds i don't think you are right in terms of the time requirements. We are already given N. all we need to do is decompose it into 2 primes. i have this done by brute force already in 4 mins with my vb.net code. I simply was hoping to get some help in reducing this down to a few seconds or less – Charles Okwuagwu Aug 12 '15 at 5:26
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    Oh, I am very sorry, you are right about the time requirement. I was making my estimate from my own experience with Pollard Rho and from a general estimate of a number in the range of 2^63 as being about 18 digits long. That much is correct. I remembered my Pollard Rho taking a few seconds with, for example, 12 digit numbers. But I misremembered a critical fact. The couple seconds was for when the prime factors were 12 digits, not when the product was 12 digits. My program will factor a semiprime 18 digit number in the blink of an eye. I will post it for you. – WDS Aug 12 '15 at 5:39
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    @CharlesO, GNU factor code is the NT project from Neil and Torbjörn. Self-contained, no GMP, 128-bit. My native code is in github.com/danaj/Math-Prime-Util which can be compiled standalone (see end of factor.c), with GMP code at github.com/danaj/Math-Prime-Util-GMP. One of my to-do projects is to turn it all into regular C library. – DanaJ Aug 13 '15 at 13:35
2

Ugh! I just put this program in and then realized you had tagged your question C#. This is C++, a version of Pollard Rho I wrote a couple years ago and posted here on SO to help someone else understand it. It is many times faster at factoring semiprimes than trial division is. As I said, I regret that it is C++ and not C#, but you should be able to understand the concept and even port it pretty easily. As a bonus, the .NET library has a namespace for handling arbitrarily large integers where my C++ implementation required me to go find a third party library for them. Anyway, even in C#, the below program will break a 2^63 order semiprime into 2 primes in less than 1 second. There are faster algorithms even than this, but they are much more complex.

#include <string>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <iostream>
#include "BigIntegerLibrary.hh"

typedef BigInteger BI;
typedef BigUnsigned BU;

using std::string;
using std::cin;
using std::cout;

BU pollard(BU &numberToFactor);
BU gcda(BU differenceBetweenCongruentFunctions, BU numberToFactor);
BU f(BU &x, BU &numberToFactor, int &increment);
void initializeArrays();
BU getNumberToFactor ();
void factorComposites();
bool testForComposite (BU &num);

BU primeFactors[1000];
BU compositeFactors[1000];
BU tempFactors [1000];
int primeIndex;
int compositeIndex;
int tempIndex;
int numberOfCompositeFactors;
bool allJTestsShowComposite;

int main ()
{
    while(1)
    {
        primeIndex=0;
        compositeIndex=0;
        tempIndex=0;
        initializeArrays();
        compositeFactors[0] = getNumberToFactor();
        cout<<"\n\n";
        if (compositeFactors[0] == 0) return 0;
        numberOfCompositeFactors = 1;
        factorComposites();
    }
}

void initializeArrays()
{
    for (int i = 0; i<1000;i++)
    {
        primeFactors[i] = 0;
        compositeFactors[i]=0;
        tempFactors[i]=0;
    }
}

BU getNumberToFactor ()
{
    std::string s;
    std::cout<<"Enter the number for which you want a prime factor, or 0 to     quit: ";
    std::cin>>s;
    return stringToBigUnsigned(s);
}

void factorComposites()
{
    while (numberOfCompositeFactors!=0)
    {
        compositeIndex = 0;
        tempIndex = 0;

        // This while loop finds non-zero values in compositeFactors.
        // If they are composite, it factors them and puts one factor in     tempFactors,
        // then divides the element in compositeFactors by the same amount.
        // If the element is prime, it moves it into tempFactors (zeros the     element in compositeFactors)
        while (compositeIndex < 1000)
        {
            if(compositeFactors[compositeIndex] == 0)
            {
                compositeIndex++;
                continue;
            }
            if(testForComposite(compositeFactors[compositeIndex]) == false)
            {
                tempFactors[tempIndex] = compositeFactors[compositeIndex];
                compositeFactors[compositeIndex] = 0;
                tempIndex++;
                compositeIndex++;
            }
            else
            {
                tempFactors[tempIndex] = pollard     (compositeFactors[compositeIndex]);
                compositeFactors[compositeIndex] /= tempFactors[tempIndex];
                tempIndex++;
                compositeIndex++;
            }
        }
        compositeIndex = 0;

        // This while loop moves all remaining non-zero values from     compositeFactors into tempFactors
        // When it is done, compositeFactors should be all 0 value elements
        while (compositeIndex < 1000)
        {
            if (compositeFactors[compositeIndex] != 0)
            {
                tempFactors[tempIndex] = compositeFactors[compositeIndex];
                compositeFactors[compositeIndex] = 0;
                tempIndex++;
                compositeIndex++;
            }
            else compositeIndex++;
        }
        compositeIndex = 0;
        tempIndex = 0;
    // This while loop checks all non-zero elements in tempIndex.
    // Those that are prime are shown on screen and moved to primeFactors
    // Those that are composite are moved to compositeFactors
    // When this is done, all elements in tempFactors should be 0
    while (tempIndex<1000)
    {
        if(tempFactors[tempIndex] == 0)
        {
            tempIndex++;
            continue;
        }
        if(testForComposite(tempFactors[tempIndex]) == false)
        {
            primeFactors[primeIndex] = tempFactors[tempIndex];
            cout<<primeFactors[primeIndex]<<"\n";
            tempFactors[tempIndex]=0;
            primeIndex++;
            tempIndex++;
        }
        else
        {
            compositeFactors[compositeIndex] = tempFactors[tempIndex];
            tempFactors[tempIndex]=0;
            compositeIndex++;
            tempIndex++;
        }
    }
    compositeIndex=0;
    numberOfCompositeFactors=0;

    // This while loop just checks to be sure there are still one or more composite factors.
    // As long as there are, the outer while loop will repeat
    while(compositeIndex<1000)
    {
        if(compositeFactors[compositeIndex]!=0) numberOfCompositeFactors++;
        compositeIndex ++;
    }
}
return;
}

// The following method uses the Miller-Rabin primality test to prove with 100% confidence a given number is composite,
// or to establish with a high level of confidence -- but not 100% -- that it is prime

bool testForComposite (BU &num)
{
    BU confidenceFactor = 101;
    if (confidenceFactor >= num) confidenceFactor = num-1;
    BU a,d,s, nMinusOne;
    nMinusOne=num-1;
    d=nMinusOne;
    s=0;
    while(modexp(d,1,2)==0)
    {
        d /= 2;
        s++;
    }
    allJTestsShowComposite = true; // assume composite here until we can prove otherwise
    for (BI i = 2 ; i<=confidenceFactor;i++)
    {
        if (modexp(i,d,num) == 1) 
            continue;  // if this modulus is 1, then we cannot prove that num is composite with this value of i, so continue
        if (modexp(i,d,num) == nMinusOne)
        {
            allJTestsShowComposite = false;
            continue;
        }
        BU exponent(1);     
        for (BU j(0); j.toInt()<=s.toInt()-1;j++)
        {
            exponent *= 2;
            if (modexp(i,exponent*d,num) == nMinusOne)
            {
                // if the modulus is not right for even a single j, then break and increment i.
                allJTestsShowComposite = false;
                continue;
            }
        }
        if (allJTestsShowComposite == true) return true; // proven composite with 100% certainty, no need to continue testing
    }
    return false;
    /* not proven composite in any test, so assume prime with a possibility of error = 
    (1/4)^(number of different values of i tested).  This will be equal to the value of the
confidenceFactor variable, and the "witnesses" to the primality of the number being tested will be all integers from
2 through the value of confidenceFactor.

Note that this makes this primality test cryptographically less secure than it could be.  It is theoretically possible,
if difficult, for a malicious party to pass a known composite number for which all of the lowest n integers fail to
detect that it is composite.  A safer way is to generate random integers in the outer "for" loop and use those in place of
the variable i.  Better still if those random numbers are checked to ensure no duplicates are generated.
*/
}

BU pollard(BU &n)
{
    if (n == 4) return 2;
    BU x = 2;
    BU y = 2;
    BU d = 1;
    int increment = 1;

    while(d==1||d==n||d==0)
    {
        x = f(x,n, increment);
        y = f(y,n, increment);
        y = f(y,n, increment);
        if (y>x)
        {
            d = gcda(y-x, n);
        }
        else
        {
            d = gcda(x-y, n);
        }
        if (d==0) 
        {
            x = 2;
            y = 2;
            d = 1;
            increment++; // This changes the pseudorandom function we use to increment x and y
        }
    }
    return d;
}


BU gcda(BU a, BU b)
{
    if (a==b||a==0)
        return 0;   // If x==y or if the absolute value of (x-y) == the number to be factored, then we have failed to find
                    // a factor.  I think this is not proof of primality, so the process could be repeated with a new function.
                    // For example, by replacing x*x+1 with x*x+2, and so on.  If many such functions fail, primality is likely.

    BU currentGCD = 1;
    while (currentGCD!=0) // This while loop is based on Euclid's algorithm
    {
        currentGCD = b % a;
        b=a;
        a=currentGCD;
    }
    return b;
}

BU f(BU &x, BU &n, int &increment)
{
    return (x * x + increment) % n;
}
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  • 1
    By the way, I don't know if this is accepted practice on SO, but here is a link to the executable on my Dropbox if you want to try it before you bother with trying to port and compile. If you do grab a copy of it, you will of course want to virus scan it. You will not find any virus on it because there is none there. But it is good practice all the same. dropbox.com/s/qvinsmnjy1ft82g/Pollard%20Rho%20Complete.exe?dl=0 – WDS Aug 12 '15 at 5:56
  • with 1724114033281923457 it takes 2+ seconds. thanks – Charles Okwuagwu Aug 12 '15 at 6:00
  • Please can you direct me to any faster algorithm by name, possibly with a .net implementation. Thanks. – Charles Okwuagwu Aug 12 '15 at 12:27
  • Unfortunately, I have never seen anything on .net faster than this Pollard Rho. Faster is 100% possible, but I have never seen anyone write it. But to give you an idea what is possible, check out msieve. Go here:sourceforge.net/projects/msieve/files/msieve/Msieve%20v1.52 and download and extract the file msieve152_gpu.zip. Then browse to that folder in a cmd window and type "msieve152_gpu -q 1724114033281923457" and hit enter. It factors that number in a fraction of a second. I think there are faster programs than this, but this is the fastest I have ever seen and is very good. – WDS Aug 12 '15 at 17:51
  • I would love to see where that programmer put the same power in a DLL that could be called either as a .NET library or more likely via Interop. But I have not found anything like that. – WDS Aug 12 '15 at 17:53
4

Pollard's Rho Algorithm [VB.Net]

Finds P very fast, where P*Q = N, for N < 2^63

Dim rnd As New System.Random

Function PollardRho(n As BigInteger) As BigInteger
    If n Mod 2 = 0 Then Return 2

    Dim x As BigInteger = rnd.Next(1, 1000)
    Dim c As BigInteger = rnd.Next(1, 1000)
    Dim g As BigInteger = 1
    Dim y = x

    While g = 1
        x = ((x * x) Mod n + c) Mod n
        y = ((y * y) Mod n + c) Mod n
        y = ((y * y) Mod n + c) Mod n
        g = gcd(BigInteger.Abs(x - y), n)
    End While

    Return g
End Function

Function gcd(a As BigInteger, b As BigInteger) As BigInteger
    Dim r As BigInteger
    While b <> 0
        r = a Mod b
        a = b
        b = r
    End While
    Return a
End Function

Richard Brent's Algorithm [VB.Net] This is even faster.

Function Brent(n As BigInteger) As BigInteger
    If n Mod 2 = 0 Then Return 2

    Dim y As BigInteger = rnd.Next(1, 1000)
    Dim c As BigInteger = rnd.Next(1, 1000)
    Dim m As BigInteger = rnd.Next(1, 1000)

    Dim g As BigInteger = 1
    Dim r As BigInteger = 1
    Dim q As BigInteger = 1

    Dim x As BigInteger = 0
    Dim ys As BigInteger = 0

    While g = 1
        x = y
        For i = 1 To r
            y = ((y * y) Mod n + c) Mod n
        Next
        Dim k = New BigInteger(0)
        While (k < r And g = 1)
            ys = y
            For i = 1 To BigInteger.Min(m, r - k)
                y = ((y * y) Mod n + c) Mod n
                q = q * (BigInteger.Abs(x - y)) Mod n
            Next

            g = gcd(q, n)
            k = k + m
        End While
        r = r * 2
    End While

    If g = n Then
        While True
            ys = ((ys * ys) Mod n + c) Mod n
            g = gcd(BigInteger.Abs(x - ys), n)
            If g > 1 Then
                Exit While
            End If
        End While
    End If

    Return g
End Function
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