4

I'm working on old exams to get ready for my own exam and the professor is nice enough to also give us the solutions to them and now I'm wondering why one function does what it's supposed to.

(defun sortulists (L)
  (mapcar (lambda (uliste)
            (sort uliste (lambda (x1 x2)
                           (or (symbolp x2)
                               (and (numberp x1) (numberp x2)
                                    (< x1 x2))))))
          L))

It's supposed to take a list L with unsorted sublists which might contain numbers and atoms and sort first it's numbers and put the symbols at the end.

When called like this (sortulists '((A 9 b h 2) (1 m n 9 8) (5 a 7))) it returns ((2 9 H B A) (1 8 9 N M) (5 7 A)).

Any help?

Edit: fixed indentation

3
  • Any precisions on what part you do not understand? – Pascal Aug 12 '15 at 17:33
  • My problem is understanding the (or symbolp x2) (and (numberp x1) (numberp x2) (< x1 x2)))))) part. I understand that < x1 x2 is the actual sorting but I'm confused as to the or and and. Is it either the symbol or the sorted numbers? – EviL GaMer Aug 12 '15 at 17:39
  • Note that this predicate results in unpredictable order for symbols. Also, your example call is passing a literal list to sortulists, which will pass the inner literal lists to sort, which is allowed to destructively modify the sequence. This means undefined behavior. – acelent Aug 13 '15 at 11:03
6

The predicate of the sort function states what test has to be true once the sequence is sorted. How the sorting is done is not defined.

If you struggle with and and or as they are used here, I suggest you read the chapter Conditionals of Common Lisp: A Gentle Introduction to Symbolic Computation. It shows how you can interchange cond, nested ifs and the combination and and or, and it provides exercises (and their solutions).

In short, either there has to be a symbol on the right, or, if both are numbers, they must be sorted by size.

1
  • The part about the sort function and test really helped. Thank you. – EviL GaMer Aug 12 '15 at 22:25
6
(or
    ; if x2 is a symbol, then x1 is smaller, whatever x1 is
    (symbolp x2)

    ; if both are numbers, then return t if x1 is smaller than x2
    (and (numberp x1) (numberp x2)
         (< x1 x2)))

So the numbers are sorted and at the front. The symbols are at the end, but unsorted.

3

So to state the obvious:

(defun sortulists (L)
  (mapcar (lambda (uliste)
            (sort uliste (lambda (x1 x2)
                           (or (symbolp x2)
                               (and (numberp x1) (numberp x2)
                                    (< x1 x2))))))
          L))

mapcar just makes a list of applying the anonymous function to each element. So to just focus on one element '(A 9 b h 2) you can do:

;; same as the anonymous lambda, but named so we can test it a little
(defun my< (x1 x2)
  (or (symbolp x2)
      (and (numberp x1) (numberp x2)
           (< x1 x2))))

(sort '(A  9  b  h  2) #'my<) ; ==> (2 9 B H A)

(my< 2 'a)                    ; ==> T 
(my< 2 3)                     ; ==> T
(my< 3 3)                     ; ==> NIL
(my< 'a 2)                    ; ==> NIL
(my< 'a 'b)                   ; ==> T
(my< 'b 'a)                   ; ==> T

Looking at my< x1 is smaller than x2 if x2 is a symbol. x1 is also smaller if they both are numbers and x1 is arithmetic smaller than x2. For everything else x1 is either equal or greater than x2.

If you mix a little the symbols in the argument list you might see that you are getting the symbols in a different order than the original list. The reason is that two symbols compared will become t both ways so 'a is smaller than 'b and 'b is smaller than 'a. A version where we keep the order of the symbols in the result would look like this:

(stable-sort '(A  9  b  h  2)
      (lambda (x1 x2)
        (and (numberp x1) 
             (or (not (numberp x2))
                 (< x1 x2)))))
; ==> (2 9 A B H)

Notice I used the stable-sort function as sort is not guaranteed to be stable. Stable means equal objects are kept in the same order as the source.

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