I cannot parse strings that contain dates, that include the short version of the month May in Greek (Μαϊ, which is in short for Μαΐου - note on the ϊ-ΐ difference).

For example:

25 Μαϊ 1989
24 Μαΐ 1967

won't parse, if I use the following formats:

"d MMM yyyy"
"dd MMM yyyy"

through the following code:

String dateString = "24 Μαΐ 1967"; // just an example of an input String
SimpleDateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat(someFormat);
format.parse(dateString);

EDIT: The values I am trying to parse are strings stored in sqlite3 database in Android. In particular it's Contact Birthdays . Although Android dependant, I'll share the code for any insight:

Cursor cur = context.getContentResolver().query(ContactsContract.Data.CONTENT_URI,null,null,null,null);
while(cur.moveToNext()){
   String birthdayString = cur.getString(INDEX_OF_BIRTHDAY);
}
  • 2
    Have you tried constructor with locale parameter? – lukaslew Aug 12 '15 at 19:16
  • Are you reading the value of dateString from a Stream -- or where does it come from? – Mick Mnemonic Aug 12 '15 at 19:16
  • @lukaslew Yup, I have tried that. The locale is greek so I tried using new Locale("el") or new Locale("el","GR"), but still nothing. – Alex Styl Aug 12 '15 at 19:24
  • @MickMnemonic I am using the code on Android, and that String is a date taken from the birthday database of the device – Alex Styl Aug 12 '15 at 19:25
  • How are you reading the value -- are you explicitly specifying a charset encoding? – Mick Mnemonic Aug 12 '15 at 19:27
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The other answers are correct, such as the Answer by Franz Becker. But they use the old java.util.Date & java.text.SimpleDateFormat classes.

java.time

Here is similar code but using the new java.time and java.time.format packages in Java 8 and later.

Parsing String

The Question provided two example input strings. Notice the different diacritical signs. The first one works, but the second one fails. I have no explanation, as I don’t know that language… "It's all Greek to me". ;-)

String input1 = "25 Μαϊ 1989";
String input2 = "24 Μαΐ 1967"; // Different diacritical over the "i".

Fetch a Locale instance using the static method Locale.forLanguageTag, new in Java 7. Specify an ISO 639 language code (via IETF BCP 47) for Modern Greek language.

Locale locale = Locale.forLanguageTag("el");

Specify the exact pattern we expect.

DateTimeFormatter formatter = DateTimeFormatter.ofPattern( "dd MMM yyyy" ).withLocale( locale );

Parse using the recommended parse method that takes a method reference (Tutorial), LocalDate :: from, in the new Java 8 Lambda syntax.

LocalDate localDate1 = formatter.parse( input1, LocalDate :: from );
LocalDate localDate2 = formatter.parse( input2, LocalDate :: from );  // Fails… Exception in thread "main" java.time.format.DateTimeParseException: Text '24 Μαΐ 1967' could not be parsed at index 3.

Dump to console.

System.out.println( "localDate1 = " + localDate1 );

When run.

localDate1 = 1989-05-25

Generating String

Going the other way, to generate a String representation of a LocalDate, let java.time do the work of determining a localized format. Using automated localization may be easier and more flexible that hard-coding a specific format.

DateTimeFormatter formatterOutput =  DateTimeFormatter.ofLocalizedDate( FormatStyle.MEDIUM ).withLocale( locale );
String output = formatterOutput.format( localDate1 );

System.out.println( "output = " + output );  // output = 25 Μαϊ 1989

Full Month Name

That second input string with a different diacritical seems to be an inappropriate abbreviation of the full month name Μαΐου. Using that full month name with another formatter (four M pattern characters) does successfully parse. Again, I do not know Modern Greek, so this explanation is just a guess on the part of me and the people commenting on this Answer.

This example code demonstrates the successful parsing of input3.

String input1 = "25 Μαϊ 1989";
String input2 = "24 Μαΐ 1967";  // Different diacritical over the "i". Incorrect abbreviation of full month name?
String input3 = "23 Μαΐου 1978";  // Full month name with different diacritical.

Locale locale = Locale.forLanguageTag( "el" );
DateTimeFormatter formatterShort = DateTimeFormatter.ofPattern( "dd MMM yyyy" ).withLocale( locale );
DateTimeFormatter formatterFull = DateTimeFormatter.ofPattern( "dd MMMM yyyy" ).withLocale( locale );

LocalDate localDate1 = formatterShort.parse( input1, LocalDate :: from );
// LocalDate localDate2 = formatter.parse( input2, LocalDate :: from );  // Fails… Exception in thread "main" java.time.format.DateTimeParseException: Text '24 Μαΐ 1967' could not be parsed at index 3.
LocalDate localDate3 = formatterFull.parse( input3, LocalDate :: from );

System.out.println( "localDate1 = " + localDate1 );
System.out.println( "localDate3 = " + localDate3 );
  • Mhh, thats a bit strange ... :D. You mentioned the different "Μαΐ", but instead of fixing it you rather use input1 for both LocalDate instances. Copy and paste mistake? – Tom Aug 12 '15 at 20:27
  • @Tom Yes, that was a mistake. Thanks for catching that. When I fixed that mistake I discovered the second spelling "Μαΐ" fails parsing. – Basil Bourque Aug 12 '15 at 21:16
  • Yes, the second one is kind of strange. Maybe a different letter in the greek alphabet. – Tom Aug 12 '15 at 21:25
  • Not that I know any greek at all but this might be from the long name of the month. It is written Μαΐου so there's a ΐ character in there. – Franz Becker Aug 12 '15 at 22:50
  • @FranzBecker Yes, you seem to have found the solution. That second input string may be a bad abbreviation. Using the full month name you provided does indeed parse successfully. See my edit to the Answer with demo code. – Basil Bourque Aug 14 '15 at 21:17

This works on my machine (Java 8):

String dateString = "24 Μαϊ 1967"; // just an example of an input String
SimpleDateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat("dd MMM yyyy", new Locale("el", "GR"));
format.parse(dateString);

You can print out the available short months like this:

Locale locale = new Locale("el", "GR");
DateFormatSymbols dfs = DateFormatSymbols.getInstance(locale);
for (String m : dfs.getShortMonths()) {
    System.out.println(m);
}

It works fine here (on Java 8) if

  • you pass the greek locale to the SimpleDateFormat constructor: Locale.forLanguageTag("el")
  • you use Μαϊ and not Μαΐ.

    String dateString = "24 Μαϊ 1967"; // just an example of an input String
    SimpleDateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat("dd MMM yyyy", Locale.forLanguageTag("el"));
    Date parsed = format.parse(dateString);
    System.out.println("parsed = " + parsed); // parsed = Wed May 24 00:00:00 CET 1967
    
  • 1
    Locale.forLanguageTag("el") would also work (just a note :)). – Tom Aug 12 '15 at 19:25
  • 1
    FYI, I believe Tom's comment refers to the fact that Locale was revamped in Java 7 and Java 8 with new static methods for getting Locale instances. The old-school constructors remain in place for compatibility (not deprecated). – Basil Bourque Aug 12 '15 at 20:05
  • I didn't know this factory method (I usually use one of the constants). The post has been edited. Thanks to both of you. – JB Nizet Aug 12 '15 at 20:55

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