16

I'm building a simple webpage with some marketing content. One thing I don't like is that if a line of text is too long, it will wrap onto the next line, which is fine, but it often wraps in such a way that there is only one word on the new line, which is just bad news from a design standpoint.

Such and such doesn't have to be difficult. Such and such product makes it
easy

What can I do to dynamically ensure at least two words on each hanging line?

Such and such doesn't have to be difficult. Such and such product makes
it easy

  • "which is just bad news from a design standpoint."...I dispute your contention. If a line wraps to just a single word so be it...a least it looks natural rather than forcing an unnatural break. – Paulie_D Aug 12 '15 at 20:52
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    @Paulie_D - fwiw, it's common in the realm of print media to obsess on this stuff.. page layout applications (well, back when I used them it was Quark XPress and Aldus/Adobe PageMaker) like InDesign have built in features to aid in the prevention of "widows" / "orphans" .. – bkwdesign Mar 25 '16 at 5:53
  • Yeah...but this isnt print...it's the web. developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/widows – Paulie_D Mar 25 '16 at 9:54
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    I agree, having a hanging word is undesirable. "It's the web" is not a great excuse IMO. – BoosterStage Feb 28 '17 at 23:47
  • Possible duplicate of How can I avoid one word on the last line with CSS? – clickbait Aug 10 '18 at 0:41
18

The simple solution is to use a non-breaking space between the last two words at the end of a paragraph.

 

<p>Such and such doesn't have to be difficult. Such and such product makes it&nbsp;easy</p>

This could get tedious if you have a lot of content and especially if it is business controlled. In that case you may be able to find a library or write a solution that automatically inserts the non-breaking space between the last two words of every paragraph for you.

Try this: https://matthewlein.com/tools/widowfix

  • 2
    similarly, you could wrap the last two words in a <nobr> tag, e.g. – Jon z Jul 12 '17 at 19:25
9

EDIT: The best answer is much cleaner -- you should probably use that instead. I'm leaving my answer up because it does work and it has some value for weird cases (e.g. if you're using a dash instead of a space, if you don't want to use &nbsp;, etc).


Here's a neat little solution. Create a CSS class like this:

.nobr { white-space:nowrap; }

Any element with the class "nobr" will not be allowed to wrap white-space (spaces, tabs, etc) onto new lines. So just surround the last two words of your text with a span.nobr.

<p>Such and such doesn't have to be difficult. Such and such product makes <span class="nobr">it easy</span></p>
  • or he could just put in a <br> tag – Rachel Gallen Aug 12 '15 at 20:15
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    A <br> tag would force the paragraph to break before the last two words, which isn't what he wants. Doing that, you might end up with a line with one word above the line with the last two words, and that'd be worse. – Hayden Schiff Aug 12 '15 at 20:17
0

I would use a <nobr>last two words.</nobr> tag.

This also gives the benefit of not cutting off any HTML flourishes you may be doing, eg:

<b>&ldquo;</b>Here's a big statement I don't want <nobr>cutting off<b>&rdquo;</b>.</nobr>

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