14

I have the following linear regression:

import statsmodels.formula.api as sm

model = sm.ols(formula = 'a ~ b + c', data = data).fit()

I want to add a quadratic term for b in this model.

Is there a simple way to do this with statsmodels.ols? Is there a better package I should be using to achieve this?

24

Although the solution by Alexander is working, in some situations it is not very convenient. For example, each time you want to predict the outcome of the model for new values, you need to remember to pass both b**2 and b values which is cumbersome and should not be necessary. Although patsy does not recognize the notation "b**2", it does recognize numpy functions. Thus, you can use

import statsmodels.formula.api as sm
import numpy as np

data = {"a":[2, 3, 5], "b":[2, 3, 5], "c":[2, 3, 5]}
model = sm.ols(formula = 'a ~ np.power(b, 2) + b + c', data = data).fit()

In this way, latter, you can reuse this model without the need to specify a value for b**2

model.predict({"a":[1, 2], "b":[5, 2], "c":[2, 4]})
  • I know I'm late to the party here, but what does the tilde ~ mean in formula = 'a ~ np.power(b, 2) + b + c'? – Jim421616 Dec 9 '18 at 23:41
  • 1
    @Jim421616 like in R programming language, the ~ means that a is a linear combination of np.power(b, 2) + b + c – Hemerson Tacon Feb 25 at 1:53
25

The simplest way is

model = sm.ols(formula = 'a ~ b + c + I(b**2)', data = data).fit()

The I(...) basically says "patsy, please stop being clever here and just let Python handle everything inside kthx". (More detailed explanation)

1

This should work:

data['b2'] = data.b ** 2
model = sm.ols(formula = 'a ~ b2 + b + c', data=data).fit()
  • do you know if this depends on a certain version? for me the b**2 term is just skipped – datavoredan Aug 13 '15 at 3:38
  • upgraded statsmodels to 0.6.1 and still no good – datavoredan Aug 13 '15 at 3:47
  • Creating a design matrix from the formulas is done by patsy and will be independent of the statsmodels version. (I don't know how patsy treats the power operation in a formula.) – Josef Aug 13 '15 at 4:34

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