24

Could someone please point me toward a cleaner method to generate a random enum member. This works but seems ugly.

Thanks!

public T RandomEnum<T>()
{
  string[] items = Enum.GetNames(typeof( T ));
  Random r = new Random();
  string e = items[r.Next(0, items.Length - 1)];
  return (T)Enum.Parse(typeof (T), e, true);
}

5 Answers 5

43
public T RandomEnum<T>()
{ 
  T[] values = (T[]) Enum.GetValues(typeof(T));
  return values[new Random().Next(0,values.Length)];
}

Thanks to @[Marc Gravell] for ponting out that the max in Random.Next(min,max) is exclusive.

3
  • 3
    Of course in a real implementation you would not want to use a new Random every call (especially if you call it often) and I personally would want to cache the array.
    – Dolphin
    Dec 15, 2009 at 21:21
  • 1
    Note that Silverlight doesn't have Enum.GetValues. See alternate solution further down. Jan 4, 2011 at 20:40
  • 2
    BEWARE This answer is flawed. As it was said before if the generation is tight together this will result in no randomness at all.
    – Luis
    Nov 8, 2012 at 4:05
15

Marxidad's answer is good (note you only need Next(0,values.Length), since the upper bound is exclusive) - but watch out for timing. If you do this in a tight loop, you will get lots of repeats. To make it more random, consider keeping the Random object in a field - i.e.

private Random rand = new Random();
public T RandomEnum<T>()
{ 
  T[] values = (T[]) Enum.GetValues(typeof(T));
  return values[rand.Next(0,values.Length)];
}

If it is a static field, you will need to synchronize access.

1
  • In my case it's just generating some defaults for a game - no loops at all. Thanks for the advice!
    – user10178
    Nov 26, 2008 at 5:44
3

Silverlight does not have GetValues(), but you can use reflection to get a random enum instead.

private Random rnd = new Random();

public T RndEnum<T>()
{
    FieldInfo[] fields = typeof(T).GetFields(BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public);

    int index = rnd.Next(fields.Length);

    return (T) Enum.Parse(typeof(T), fields[index].Name, false);
}
1
  • Thanks, I needed this for Silverlight! Jan 4, 2011 at 20:40
0

I'm not sure about c# but other languages allow gaps in enum values. To account for that:

enum A {b=0,c=2,d=3,e=42};

switch(rand.Next(0,4))
{
   case 0: return A.b;
   case 1: return A.c;
   case 2: return A.d;
   case 3: return A.e;
}

The major down side is keeping it up to date!

Not near as neat but more correct in that corner case.


As pointed out, the examples from above index into an array of valid values and this get it right. OTOH some languages (cough D cough) don't provide that array so the above is useful enough that I'll leave it anyway.

2
  • marxidad accounts for this by returning an array index not the enum's value. I did the same I just took the scenic route!
    – user10178
    Nov 26, 2008 at 6:13
  • That could have clearer. The enum is generated by its position in the array not by its value.
    – user10178
    Nov 26, 2008 at 6:16
0
Enum.Parse(typeof(SomeEnum), mRandom.Next(min, max).ToString()).ToString()
1
  • This method doesn't work if there are gaps between the numeric values of the Enum Values (and that is quite possible to happen).
    – Styxxy
    Oct 27, 2012 at 22:35

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