23

I'd like to silently break a try - catch in the try block if a condition applies. ( Without throwing an unneccessary exception )

foo = function(){

    var bar = Math.random() > .5;

    try{

          if( bar ) // Break this try, even though there is no exception here.

          //  This code should not execute if !!bar 

          alert( bar );

    }
    catch( e ){}

    // Code that executes if !!bar

    alert( true );

}

foo();

However, return is not an option, since the function is supposed to continue executing afterwards.

UPDATE

I'd like to still keep up the opportunity to use the finally block.

7
  • 2
    What about if( !bar ) ? (If around the rest of the code in the try block)
    – blablabla
    Aug 13, 2015 at 12:54
  • In case of !bar, the code should continue executing with line alert( bar ); Aug 13, 2015 at 12:55
  • @StevenPalinkas: blablabla meant smth like this if (!bar){alert(bar);}
    – Andrey
    Aug 13, 2015 at 12:56
  • @Andrey: That is what I mean. Thanks.
    – blablabla
    Aug 13, 2015 at 12:58
  • 1
    I have to know, why would anyone need this? If feel like were have a case of XY Problem.
    – Domino
    Aug 13, 2015 at 13:02

3 Answers 3

41

You can label a block and break from it using the break label syntax

as per your edit, finally is still executed

foo = function(){
    var bar = Math.random() > .5;
    omgalabel: try {
        if( bar ) break omgalabel;
        console.log( bar );
        // code 
    }
    catch( e ){
        //  This code should not execute if !!bar 
    }
    finally {
        // Code that executes no matter what
        console.log( true );
    }
}
13
  • 3
    The much simpler and cleaner solution is to not enter the try..catch at all if bar is truthy. Labels are considered the equivalent of GOTO and are extremely rarely used.
    – RobG
    Aug 13, 2015 at 13:05
  • Wow, you can break from a non-loop using a label?
    – Kos
    Aug 13, 2015 at 13:06
  • 4
    @RobG preaching to the converted, but as the question is obviously dumbed down, who are we to judge. You want someone to rewrite 2000 lines of code just because you say try/catch is bad mmmkay. Sometimes as programmers we get to deal with other peoples code, and sometimes a rewrite is not the #1 priority. So, while I agree with your sentiment, and that the comment is a valid one on the question, there's no need to harp on about it in an answer, is there? Aug 13, 2015 at 13:09
  • 2
    Thanks for teaching me this. I don't care what people think of us, GOTO marriage is now legal in Javascript, hurray :D
    – Domino
    Aug 13, 2015 at 13:13
  • 2
    it's NOT a goto, not even close ... it breaks OUT of a labelled block (the label is ABOVE the break statement, it does not allow you to jump to arbitrary labelled block - nested labelled blocks can be fun too - developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… - it's closer to a return in an inner function ... sort of Aug 13, 2015 at 13:16
1
foo = function(){

    var bar = Math.random() > .5;
    if( ! bar ) {
        try{
            //  This code should not execute if !!bar 
            alert( bar );
        }
        catch( e ){
            console.error(e);
        }
    }

    // Code that executes no matter what
    alert( true );
}

foo();

Why don't you check the boolean before you enter the try…catch?

2
  • 3
    as the OP said in his question - this is a simplified example Aug 13, 2015 at 13:20
  • @JaromandaX, even if the example is simplified, the question still remains. If this isn't possible, I think it might be the time to refactor :)
    – Pjetr
    Aug 13, 2015 at 13:58
1
var error;
var bar = Math.random() > .5;
try{
   if(bar){throw new Error('#!@$');} // Break this try, even though there is no exception here.
   //  This code should not execute if !!bar 
   alert( bar );
   }
catch(e){
   if(e.stack.indexOf('#!@$')==-1){error=e;}
   }
finally{
   if(error){
       //an actual error happened
       }
   else{
       // Code that executes if !!bar
       alert( true );
       }
   }

you can throw a error inside try catch and detect the string of the error stack to see if it was an expected throw or an actual error you didn't expect

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