8

I have a list of class objects and want to remove one item but it doesn´t work:

    class Person
    {
        public string name; 
        public Person(string s)
        {
            this.name = s;
        }
    }

    void ABC()
    {
        List<Person> newPersonList = new List<Person>();
        newPersonList.Add(new Person("A"));
        newPersonList.Add(new Person("B"));
        newPersonList.Add(new Person("C"));

        newPersonList.Remove(A);
        newPersonList.RemoveAt(1);
    }

RemoveAt(1) works and deletes item with the ID 1.

I think Remove(A) should delete the item with the value "A". But this is not working. Can someone explain why? And what is the right way to delete by value?

1
  • 1
    What do you think should happen at Remove(A);? You haven't declared A. In general you need to override Equals in Person or/and implement IEquatable<Person> – Tim Schmelter Aug 13 '15 at 13:55
21

Easiest way to remove from list by element's property value:

newPersonList.RemoveAll(p => p.name == "A");

Nicer way would be to change Person like that:

class Person : IEquatable<Person>
{
    public readonly string Name;
    public Person(string name)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(name))
            throw new ArgumentException("name");
        Name = name;
    }
    public static implicit operator string(Person p)
    {
        return p.Name;
    }
    public static implicit operator Person(string name)
    {
        return new Person(name);
    }
    public bool Equals(Person other)
    {
        return Name.Equals(other.Name);
    }
}

And then use it like that:

var newPersonList = new List<Person>
{
    new Person("A"),
    new Person("B"),
    new Person("C")
};
newPersonList.Remove("A");

Or even like that:

var newPersonList = new List<Person> { "A", "B", "C" };
newPersonList.Remove(new Person("A"));
5
  • 3
    He can use newPersonList.RemoveAll(p => p.name == "A"). Your approach needs to scan the list twice. But better is to override Equals in Person or let it implement IEquatable<Person>. Then Remove works as expected. – Tim Schmelter Aug 13 '15 at 13:57
  • @TimSchmelter Average complexity is better for my solution =) – astef Aug 13 '15 at 13:59
  • 1
    @astef No, your solution doesn't have a lower average complexity. It does more work, not less. – Servy Aug 13 '15 at 14:04
  • @astef: also, if there is no person with name="A" your approach throws an error. If you use FirstOrDefault to prevent that you delete a person which is null. Your second aproach works only by accident since references are compared. OP wants to compare by name. – Tim Schmelter Aug 13 '15 at 14:25
  • @TimSchmelter Agree with everything. I've edited my answer following your advices – astef Aug 13 '15 at 15:06
1

So you want .net magically to guess that by "A" string you mean field name? How is it supposed to derive it?

I would suggest you use a Dictionary if you want to operate things by their key (name in this case):

var dict = new Dictionary<string, Person>() {
   {"A", new Person("A")}
}

//and later

dict.Remove("A");
4
  • It's even more magical than that since it's just A and not a the string "A". – juharr Aug 13 '15 at 14:00
  • I assume he really meant string otherwise just A doesn't make any sense. – Andrey Aug 13 '15 at 14:23
  • If you want to make classes comparable you use a dictionary? You just need to provide a method that is used to determine if two objects are are equal which is Equals. – Tim Schmelter Aug 13 '15 at 14:28
  • @TimSchmelter I didn't say comparable. I said that if you want to retrieve objects by some field value you can use it as a key and use Dictionary. – Andrey Aug 13 '15 at 14:50
0

You have not declared A. To do newPersonList.Remove(A);

You have to declare an object Person A and add it to newPersonList

Person A = new Person("A");
newPersonList.Add(A);
0

Like other said "What is A?". If it would be a variable that contains a Person that this will work.

void ABC()
{
    var A = new Person("A");
    var B = new Person("B");
    var C = new Person("C");
    List<Person> newPersonList = new List<Person>();
    newPersonList.Add(A);
    newPersonList.Add(B);
    newPersonList.Add(C);

    newPersonList.Remove(A);
}

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