2

I’m trying to implement include guards in Gnu Make. In this Makefile, the first inclusion is OK, while the second one fails with an error.

ifndef INCLUDED
INCLUDED = 1
$(info Including)

define macro
ifneq ($(1),)
define inner_macro
macro content...
endef
else
define inner_macro
endef
endif
endef

endif

The same effect can be simulated by explicitly giving INCLUDED = 1 before the inclusion, e.g. on command line.

Gnu Make 4.1 under Gentoo says Makefile:14: *** missing separator. Stop., while Gnu Make 3.81 under Debian Wheezy says Makefile:14: *** extraneous `endef'. Stop.. On the first inclusion, they both say:

Including
make: *** No targets.  Stop.

If I try $(eval $(call macro,whatever)) after the first inclusion, it defines inner_macro as expected.

I used make INCLUDED=1 and make commands respectively to get the described behavior.

The same happens when I clear the environment and disable built-in rules and variables: env -i make -rR INCLUDE=1. When I use -p to dump the database, without INCLUDED=1, the macro is defined as it should be, but with INCLUDED=1, empty inner_macro is defined. This is consistent across both the versions of Make. This hints me that when the condition is false, Make parses the Makefile differently and thinks the else inside macro’s definition belongs to the ifndef. Other condition types behave all the same.

If I remove both the definitions of inner_macro, the problem goes away.

I read the manual pages info make conditional\ syntax and info make multi-line (formerly defining), but I found no caveat there and I still think I am doing nothing wrong.

  1. Am I correct with my conclusions?
  2. Is this a bug in Make, or am I invoking undefined behavior?
  3. How should I implement include guards in Gnu Make?
  • As a work-around, I moved the definition of macro into another file and replaced it with include that-file.mk. – Palec Aug 13 '15 at 18:13
1

That's a bug. Report it on Savannah.

There's something wrong with the tracking of nested define/endef inside a not-taken ifdef/ifndef condition. If you don't use nested define/endef then it works; for example (obviously you may not be able to do this in your environment):

ifndef INCLUDED
INCLUDED = 1
$(info Including)

define macro
ifneq ($(1),)
inner_macro = macro content...
else
inner_macro =
endif
endef

endif
  • I’ve used your work-around, although it needed some fiddling with special characters. I stored the characters into macros beforehand and used those macros’ expansions. I will look if the bug has been already reported and file it, if it is not. But is has to wait for a week, I’m extremely busy now. – Palec Aug 16 '15 at 11:32
  • It should not be necessary to fiddle with special characters due to ifdef/ifndef. I don't know what special characters you mean or what kind of fiddling you did, so I can't say more than that... – MadScientist Aug 17 '15 at 14:26
  • I used macros for newlines and tabs to be able to replace define with assignment. Without this, I’m not sure if newline can become a part of variable’s value through assignment. – Palec Aug 18 '15 at 13:35
  • I'm not sure if this applies - but I worked around this by redefining define: DEFINE = define. Then I use $(DEFINE) and $(ENDEF) instead. That way make doesn't track it at all. – nachum Oct 22 '18 at 19:35

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