5

I have a situation where I have a struct that I want to be able to be declared locally in other modules, but I only want the module where the struct is defined to be able to actually have any access to the members. Note this is for an embedded application so I do not have the ability to dynamically allocate memory (malloc).

foo.h

typedef struct my_struct T_my_struct;

int GetA(T_my_struct *bar);
int GetB(T_my_struct *bar);

foo.c

#include "foo.h"

struct my_struct
{
    int a;
    char b;
}

int GetA(T_my_struct *bar)
{
    return bar->a;
}

int GetB(T_my_struct *bar)
{
    return bar->b;
}

void Init(T_my_struct *bar)
{
    bar->a = 5;
    bar->b = 3;
}

bar.c:

#include "bar.h"
#include "foo.h"
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

static T_my_struct local_instance;  // <--storage size of local_instance not know here

int main()
{
    Init(&local_instance);

    printf("A: %d\n", GetA(&local_instance));
}

I know I could create a local T_my_struct pointer and have it allocated in foo.c, except I do not have malloc as stated earlier. I also realize that I could just make the struct definition in foo.h; however, I do not want the other modules (i.e. bar.c) to directly access any of the members. Is there a way that I can do this in C without dynamic memory allocation?

6
  • No, you want C++ in C? Not gonna work. – Bo Persson Aug 13 '15 at 22:47
  • 3
    @BoPersson I don't see the question requesting C++ anywhere – M.M Aug 13 '15 at 22:50
  • @Matt - Getters and a request for private members, and you don't smell C++ here? – Bo Persson Aug 13 '15 at 22:52
  • 3
    No, this is just an opaque type. FILE * is similar . – M.M Aug 13 '15 at 22:53
  • 2
    @ryeager en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opaque_data_type – M.M Aug 13 '15 at 22:59
3

To elaborate on my comment on Matt's answer (or your response to it), this solution uses a hidden resource pool and handles rather then pointers.

foo.h

typedef int bar_handle_t ;

int getBarHandle() ;
void freeBarHandle( bar_handle_t handle ) ;
int getA( bar_handle_t handle ) ;
int getB( bar_handle_t handle ) ;

foo.c

#include <stdbool.h>
#include "foo.h"

typedef struct
{
    int a;
    char b;
} bar_t ;

typedef struct
{
    bool in_use ;
    bar_t bar ;
} bar_pool_t ;

#define HANDLE_COUNT 20
static bar_pool_t bar_pool[HANDLE_COUNT] ;

bar_handle_t getBarHandle()
{
    bar_handle_t handle ;

    for( handle = 0 ;
         bar_pool[handle].in_use && handle < HANDLE_COUNT; 
         handle++ )
    {
        // do nothing
    }

    if( handle < HANDLE_COUNT )
    {
        bar_pool[handle].in_use = true ;
        bar_pool[handle].bar.a = 5;
        bar_pool[handle].bar.a = 3;
    }
    else
    {
        handle = -1 ;
    }

    return handle ;
} 

void freeBarHandle( bar_handle_t handle )
{
    if( handle >= 0 && handle < HANDLE_COUNT )
    {
        bar_pool[handle].in_use = false ;
    }
}

int getA( bar_handle_t handle )
{
    return bar_pool[handle].bar.a ;
}

int getB( bar_handle_t handle )
{
    return bar_pool[handle].bar.b ;
}
2

One approach would be to add a function to foo.h:

T_my_struct *get_bar_instance(void);

whose implementation in foo.c is:

T_my_struct *get_bar_instance(void)
{
     static T_my_struct x;
     return &x;
}

Then in bar.c you write get_bar_instance() instead of &local_instance.

If multiple files need an instance then make one function for each (or you could use a single function with integer argument).

3
  • I need multiple instances. I think maybe having an array of T_my_structs that is large enough to cover all other files' usage is the way to go. Was just hoping there was a better way to abstract this type away from other users. – ryeager Aug 13 '15 at 22:58
  • 2
    @ryeager if you can't malloc, then using a fixed memory pool (such as an array, as you suggest) is about the only alternative. – M.M Aug 13 '15 at 22:59
  • 1
    @ryeager : If you are going to use a pool of structs, you don't even need to return a pointer; you can simply return an index to the pool. That has the advantage that the data cannot be accessed through the pointer, providing greater privacy and protection. The client has only the integer handle, and the structure to which it refers is then entirely hidden. – Clifford Aug 14 '15 at 20:07

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