I have an array:

[ [ 'cardType', 'iDEBIT' ],
  [ 'txnAmount', '17.64' ],
  [ 'txnId', '20181' ],
  [ 'txnType', 'Purchase' ],
  [ 'txnDate', '2015/08/13 21:50:04' ],
  [ 'respCode', '0' ],
  [ 'isoCode', '0' ],
  [ 'authCode', '' ],
  [ 'acquirerInvoice', '0' ],
  [ 'message', '' ],
  [ 'isComplete', 'true' ],
  [ 'isTimeout', 'false' ] ]

But I can't access data via an array's key, e.g. arr['txnId'] does not return 20181. How can I convert the above array of tuples into an object, so that I can easily access data by key.

12 Answers 12

up vote 16 down vote accepted

This will do it:

array =    [ [ 'cardType', 'iDEBIT' ],
      [ 'txnAmount', '17.64' ],
      [ 'txnId', '20181' ],
      [ 'txnType', 'Purchase' ],
      [ 'txnDate', '2015/08/13 21:50:04' ],
      [ 'respCode', '0' ],
      [ 'isoCode', '0' ],
      [ 'authCode', '' ],
      [ 'acquirerInvoice', '0' ],
      [ 'message', '' ],
      [ 'isComplete', 'true' ],
      [ 'isTimeout', 'false' ] ];
    
var obj = {};
array.forEach(function(data){
    obj[data[0]] = data[1]
});
console.log(obj);

  • 3
    Looks like new Map(array) solution below is more straightforward – Alexander K Oct 10 '16 at 22:39
  • Or even the answer with the "reduce"-method – Ben jamin Oct 31 '17 at 7:21

If you're using ES6, you can use Object.assign and the spread operator for an approach that uses map instead of @royhowie’s reduce, which may or may not be more intuitive:

Object.assign(...arr.map(d => ({[d[0]]: d[1]})))

E.g.:

var arr = [ [ 'cardType', 'iDEBIT' ],
  [ 'txnAmount', '17.64' ],
  [ 'txnId', '20181' ],
  [ 'txnType', 'Purchase' ],
  [ 'txnDate', '2015/08/13 21:50:04' ],
  [ 'respCode', '0' ],
  [ 'isoCode', '0' ],
  [ 'authCode', '' ],
  [ 'acquirerInvoice', '0' ],
  [ 'message', '' ],
  [ 'isComplete', 'true' ],
  [ 'isTimeout', 'false' ] ]

var obj = Object.assign(...arr.map(d => ({[d[0]]: d[1]})))

console.log(obj)

  • 1
    Computed property names are also used in {[d[0]]: d[1]} :) – Chalk Oct 6 '16 at 11:42
  • 1
    Awesome, great answer. – K._ Oct 13 '16 at 6:28
  • 2
    Object.assign.apply(null, arr.map(([key, val]) => { return { [key]: val } })) is a little easier to read and understand (when spread onto multiple lines). – royhowie Jul 18 '17 at 18:22
  • What are the dots ...? – ctrl-alt-delor Oct 14 '17 at 15:26
  • 1
    A similar one-liner (with reduce) which has the advantage of being more chainable: arr.reduce((obj, d) => Object.assign(obj, {[d[0]]: d[1]}), {}) – Toph Jan 10 at 15:41

A more idiomatic approach would be to use Array.prototype.reduce:

var arr = [
  [ 'cardType', 'iDEBIT' ],
  [ 'txnAmount', '17.64' ],
  [ 'txnId', '20181' ],
  [ 'txnType', 'Purchase' ],
  [ 'txnDate', '2015/08/13 21:50:04' ],
  [ 'respCode', '0' ],
  [ 'isoCode', '0' ],
  [ 'authCode', '' ],
  [ 'acquirerInvoice', '0' ],
  [ 'message', '' ],
  [ 'isComplete', 'true' ],
  [ 'isTimeout', 'false' ]
];

var obj = arr.reduce(function (o, currentArray) {
  var key = currentArray[0], value = currentArray[1]
  o[key] = value
  return o
}, {})

console.log(obj)
document.write(JSON.stringify(obj).split(',').join(',<br>'))

This is more visually appealing, when done with ES6 (rest parameters) syntax:

let obj = arr.reduce((o, [ key, value ]) => {
    o[key] = value
    return o
}, {})
  • 3
    cleaner way to avoid param reassign const obj = arr.reduce((obj, [ key, value ]) => { return { ...obj, [key]: value }; }, {}); – huygn Jan 9 '17 at 8:41
  • 1
    Or even avoid the return statement: const obj = arr.reduce(obj, [key, value] => ({ ...obj, [key]: value }), {}) – Nils Magne Lunde Jan 9 at 8:57

Use Map.

new Map(array);

This works because the type of your variable array is Array<[key,value]>. The Map constructor can be initialized with an array of arrays where the first element of the inner arrays is the key and the second is the value.

const array = [
  ['cardType', 'iDEBIT'],
  ['txnAmount', '17.64'],
  ['txnId', '20181'],
  ['txnType', 'Purchase'],
  ['txnDate', '2015/08/13 21:50:04'],
  ['respCode', '0'],
  ['isoCode', '0'],
  ['authCode', ''],
  ['acquirerInvoice', '0'],
  ['message', ''],
  ['isComplete', 'true'],
  ['isTimeout', 'false']
];

const obj = new Map(array);

console.log(obj.get('txnDate'));

  • 1
    Don't do this...it's too simple ^^ – kashiraja Dec 6 '17 at 0:10
  • @Rick I'm confused here. I just tried this in the console: array = [['a', 1],['b','two'],['c', [3,3,3]]] and then obj = new Map(array);. However, obj.a and obj['a'] are both undefined. So how does this achieve the objective? – abalter Apr 6 at 7:52
  • @abalter See the MDN link in the answer. The Map object provides methods for get/set, as opposed to direct property access with dot or square bracket notation with raw {a: 1} style objects. – Rick Viscomi Apr 6 at 21:11
  • @RickViscomi -- Ok. Did not know about Map object. However, I would say that what most people are looking for is to get a regular JS object. – abalter Apr 7 at 0:52
  • 1
    Not sure what most people are looking for, but the original question is looking for the value '2015/08/13 21:50:04' given the property txnDate and I think this is the most semantic way to do that. – Rick Viscomi Apr 12 at 3:08
arr.reduce((o, [key, value]) => ({...o, [key]: value}), {})

use the following way to convert the array to an object easily.

var obj = {};
array.forEach(function(e){
   obj[e[0]] = e[1]
})

This will use the first element as the key and the second element as the value for each element.

Short ES6 way with Airbnb code style

Exemple:

const obj = arr.reduce((prevObj, [key, value]) => ({ ...prevObj, [key]: value }), {});

easiest way to do it where array is of your JSON data :

var obj = {};
array.forEach(function(Data){
obj[Data[0]] = Data[1]
})

I much more recommend you to use ES6 with it's perfect Object.assign() method.

Object.assign({}, ...array.map(([ key, value ]) => ({ [key]: value })));

What happening here - Object.assign() do nothing but take key:value from donating object and puts pair in your result. In this case I'm using ... to split new array to multiply pairs (after map it looks like [{'cardType':'iDEBIT'}, ... ]). So in the end, new {} receives every key:property from each pair from mapped array.

You could do this easily using array reduce in ES6

In this example we create a reducer function and pass an object '{}' as initial value to the reduce function along with the reducer

const arr =    [ [ 'cardType', 'iDEBIT' ],
  [ 'txnAmount', '17.64' ],
  [ 'txnId', '20181' ],
  [ 'txnType', 'Purchase' ],
  [ 'txnDate', '2015/08/13 21:50:04' ],
  [ 'respCode', '0' ],
  [ 'isoCode', '0' ],
  [ 'authCode', '' ],
  [ 'acquirerInvoice', '0' ],
  [ 'message', '' ],
  [ 'isComplete', 'true' ],
  [ 'isTimeout', 'false' ] ];

const reducer = (obj, item) => {
  obj[item[0]] = item[1];
  return obj;
};

const result = arr.reduce(reducer, {});

console.log(result);

In my case, all other solutions didn't work, but this one did:

obj = {...arr}

my arr is in a form: [name: "the name", email: "the@email.com"]

  • Hey, that's not a valid javascript expression. That could be either an object { name: "the name", email: "the@email.com" } or an array of objects: [{ name: "the name" }, { email: "the@email.com" }] your solution only works in the first case – Renato Aug 9 at 17:44
  • yes, it may not be a valid JS but in today world of multiple JS environments, it might happen as it happened to me. And my solution may not work for each case but it worked for me in my specific case. – xims Aug 10 at 3:08
  • My question is how do you that in the first place? If you try to do: a = [name: "the name", email: "the@email.com"] you get Uncaught SyntaxError: Unexpected token :. What do you mean with "multiple JS environments". Is there a place where that is valid javascript? (Maybe that's the toString() of some other object?) I'm just curious. – Renato Aug 10 at 16:27

When I used the reduce function with acc[i] = cur; it returned a kind of object that I needed to access it like a array using this way obj[i].property. But using this way I have the Object that I wanted and I now can access it like obj.property.

 function convertArraytoObject(arr) {
        var obj = arr.reduce(function (acc, cur, i) {
            acc = cur;
            return acc;
        }, {});
        return obj;
    }
  • I think the code as-is takes in an array as an input, and returns the last element of the array as an output. Was acc = cur meant to be acc[cur] = cur (or something else)? – therobinkim Jun 12 at 22:21

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.