3

I have a question and I'm not sure if I'm being totally stupid here or if this is a genuine problem, or if I've misunderstood what these functions do.

Is the opposite of diff the same as cumsum? I thought it was. However, using this example:

dd <- c(17.32571,17.02498,16.71613,16.40615,
        16.10242,15.78516,15.47813,15.19073,
        14.95551,14.77397)
par(mfrow = c(1,2))
plot(dd)
plot(cumsum(diff(dd)))

> dd
 [1] 17.32571 17.02498 16.71613 16.40615 16.10242 15.78516 15.47813 15.19073 14.95551
[10] 14.77397
> cumsum(diff(dd))
[1] -0.30073 -0.60958 -0.91956 -1.22329 -1.54055 -1.84758 -2.13498 -2.37020 -2.55174

These aren't the same. Where have I gone wrong?

AHHH! Fridays.

Obviously

2
  • 1
    cumsum(x) returns a vector of length(x), with each element i being the sum of x[1:i] – Heroka Aug 14 '15 at 12:06
  • 1
    The opposite of cumsum would be Reduce('-', dd, accumulate=T) – Pierre L Aug 14 '15 at 12:16
5

The functions are quite different: diff(x) returns a vector of length (length(x)-1) which contains the difference between one element and the next in a vector x, while cumsum(x) returns a vector of length equal to the length of x containing the sum of the elements in x

Example:

x <- c(1:10)
#[1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10
> diff(x)
#[1] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
v <- cumsum(x)
> v
#[1]  1  3  6 10 15 21 28 36 45 55

The function cumsum() is the cumulative sum and therefore the entries of the vector v[i] that it returns are a result of all elements in x between x[1] and x[i]. In contrast, diff(x) only takes the difference between one element x[i] and the next, x[i+1].

The combination of cumsum and diff leads to different results, depending on the order in which the functions are executed:

> cumsum(diff(x))
# 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Here the result is the cumulative sum of a sequence of nine "1". Note that if this result is compared with the original vector x, the last entry 10 is missing.

On the other hand, by calculating

> diff(cumsum(x))
# 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10

one obtains a vector that is again similar to the original vector x, but now the first entry 1 is missing.

In none of the cases the original vector is restored, therefore it cannot be stated that cumsum() is the opposite or inverse function of diff()

3

You forgot to account for the impact of the first element

dd == c(dd[[1]], dd[[1]] + cumsum(diff(dd)))

2
  • @Pierre Lafortune, I think you have misread the command, I have added only the first element. In fact, the line is equivalent to: dd[[1]] + c(0, cumsum(diff(dd)) – tguzella Aug 14 '15 at 12:21
  • 1
    maybe more simply cumsum(c(dd[1],diff(dd))) – Ben Bolker Aug 14 '15 at 12:22
2

@RHertel answered it well, stating that diff() returns a vector with length(x)-1.

Therefore, another simple workaround would be to add 0 to the beginning of the original vector so that diff() computes the difference between x[1] and 0.

> x <- 5:10

> x
#[1]  5  6  7  8  9 10

> diff(x)
#[1] 1 1 1 1 1

> diff(c(0,x))
#[1] 5 1 1 1 1 1

This way it is possible to use diff() with c() as a representation of the inverse of cumsum()

> cumsum(diff(c(0,x)))
#[1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10

> diff(c(0,cumsum(x)))
#[1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10
0

If you know the value of "lag" and "difference".

x<-5:10
y<-diff(x,lag=1,difference=1)    
z<-diffinv(y,lag=1,differences = 1,xi=5) #xi is first value.
k<-as.data.frame(cbind(x,z))
k
   x  z
1  5  5
2  6  6
3  7  7
4  8  8
5  9  9
6 10 10

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