17

Using $scope it's easy to emit an event or watch for one.

(function() {
    "use strict";

    angular
        .module("app")
        .controller("Ctrl", [
            "$scope",
            CtrlDefinition
        ]);

    function CtrlDefinition($scope) {
        $scope.$on("change", listenForChange);

        function listenForChange(data) {
            //do something
        }
    }
})();

But if I try to use var vm = this syntax, I'm warned that $on, $emit, and $broadcast are not methods of this. How can I access them? Do I still need to inject $scope in the controller definition?

(function() {
    "use strict";

    angular
        .module("app")
        .controller("Ctrl", CtrlDefinition);

    function CtrlDefinition() {
        var vm = this;
        vm.$on("change", listenForChange); //$on is not a method of vm
    }

})();

You could do something like this, but wouldn't it defeat the purpose of not having to use $scope at all?

(function() {
    "use strict";

    angular
        .module("app")
        .controller("Ctrl", [
            "$scope",
            CtrlDefinition
        ]);

    function CtrlDefinition($scope) {
        var vm = this;
        vm.scope = $scope;
        vm.scope.$on("change", listenForChange);
    }

})();

How can you access watchers with controller as syntax?

23

In order to use anything that exists on $scope, you are forced to inject $scope. It's unfortunately that straightforward, which is a shortcoming of the "as" syntax.

The good news however is that injecting $scope alongside this does not change how the controller as syntax functions, it simply gives you access to all of the event management that lives on $scope.

It's worth noting that this is one of the primary reasons for what is coming in Angular 2.0...there is a real problem and discrepancy between $scope and the "Controller as" syntax that was bolted on to solve scoping issues in views.

  • I see...I'm not too fluent in the difference between $scope and this, though your comment tempts me just to use var vm = $scope. – Daniel Lizik Aug 14 '15 at 17:34
  • 1
    this is a reserved keyword in javascript that refers to the immediate scope (in this case, the function CtrlDefinition. Although you COULD do that, you would also potentially expose data that is not relevant to your controller, which is why best practice dictates var vm = this;. – David L Aug 14 '15 at 17:36
  • @DanielLizik I would definitely not use vm = $scope you would simply be attaching everything from your controller to the $scope, which completely defeats the purpose of using vm or $ctrl. – riegersn Oct 3 '17 at 15:35

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