44

Until now, I had a GET method that looked like the following:

protected override async Task<IHttpActionResult> GetAll(QueryData query)
{
     // ... Some operations

     //LINQ Expression based on the query parameters
     Expression<Func<Entity, bool>> queryExpression = BuildQueryExpression(query);

     //Begin to count all the entities in the repository
     Task<int> countingEntities = repo.CountAsync(queryExpression);

     //Reads an entity that will be the page start
     Entity start = await repo.ReadAsync(query.Start);

     //Reads all the entities starting from the start entity
     IEnumerable<Entity> found = await repo.BrowseAllAsync(start, queryExpression);

     //Truncates to page size
     found = found.Take(query.Size);

     //Number of entities returned in response
     int count = found.Count();

     //Number of total entities (without pagination)
     int total = await countingEntities;

     return Ok(new {
          Total = total,
          Count = count,
          Last = count > 0 ? GetEntityKey(found.Last()) : default(Key),
          Data = found.Select(e => IsResourceOwner(e) ? MapToOwnerDTO(e) : MapToDTO(e)).ToList()
     });
}

This worked like a charm and it was good. However, I was told recently to send the response metadata (that is, Total, Count and Last properties) as response custom headers instead of the response body.

I cannot manage to access the Response from the ApiController. I thought of a filter or attribute, but how would I get the metadata values?

I can keep all this information on the response and then have a filter that will deserialize the response before being sent to the client, and create a new one with the headers, but that seems troublesome and bad.

Is there a way to add custom headers directly from this method on an ApiController?

6
  • 2
    Should be as simple as that
    – Andrei
    Aug 14, 2015 at 19:55
  • @Andrei I don't have a HttpContext property, but I do have an ActionContext one. However, Response property of that object is null and I cannot operate with it. Aug 14, 2015 at 20:01
  • you need to use ActionContext.Request.CreateResponse() to actually create a response and then set values in response as a strongly typed object rather than strings
    – harishr
    Aug 15, 2015 at 5:18
  • @entre I would like for the Web Api to serialize my anonymous object (i.e. using the Web Api Ok<T>(T t) method. That also includes setting some headers for me). If I create a response I have to serialize my object and I have to set all the headers manually. Aug 16, 2015 at 2:39
  • move all header setting part in a method and use that method at both places
    – harishr
    Aug 16, 2015 at 4:02

7 Answers 7

44

You can explicitly add custom headers in a method like so:

[HttpGet]
[Route("home/students")]
public HttpResponseMessage GetStudents()
{
       // Get students from Database

       // Create the response
        var response = Request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.OK, students);
    
        // Set headers for paging
        response.Headers.Add("X-Students-Total-Count", students.Count());
       
       return response;
}

For more information read this article: http://www.jerriepelser.com/blog/paging-in-aspnet-webapi-http-headers/

3
  • I'm doing this, but the headers get stripped
    – weagle08
    Feb 22, 2017 at 16:37
  • 1
    @weagle08 Does your request go through proxies? If so you can read this: stackoverflow.com/questions/20820572/…
    – Seagull
    Feb 23, 2017 at 6:54
  • Worked for me but no proxy involved in our connection
    – user755404
    Aug 16, 2017 at 14:06
34

I have entered comments, here is my complete answer.

You will need to create a custom filter and apply that to your controller .

public class CustomHeaderFilter : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public override void OnActionExecuted(HttpActionExecutedContext actionExecutedContext)
    {
       var count = actionExecutedContext.Request.Properties["Count"];
       actionExecutedContext.Response.Content.Headers.Add("totalHeader", count);
    }
}

In your Controller

  public class AddressController : ApiController
        {
            public async Task<Address> Get()
            {
               Request.Properties["Count"] = "123";
            }
    }
5
  • 6
    This works perfectly but is it the correct way to do this? My metadata should be a property of the response, not the request. I mean, it works as a solution, but is it conceptually right? Aug 14, 2015 at 22:05
  • 2
    This looks like double work to me. You may add a header directly
    – nkalfov
    Aug 3, 2017 at 16:12
  • @Nikola but then you lose the strongly typed response, which the OP didn't use but is still an option with this approach. I'm working on a web api project and not using strong types is causing issues - for one we can't easily generate correct swagger. Avoid returning untyped responses if you can Dec 4, 2017 at 20:28
  • 2
    In my case I found this to be the best solution for returning response data in the headers, but you have to be careful where the action filter gets the data. I has to get the data for the request you are processing, I looked all over the place for data storage that is unique to the request and the only thing I could find is the "context.Request.Properties" table, which is most likely why @Yousuf used it. Keep in mine that the "context.Response" object does not exist while processing the action, so "context.Request" seems to be the only place you can store data like this. Nov 18, 2018 at 18:40
  • Regarding strongly typed response, unfortunately that is the nature of the HTTP protocol, all data is text. You could consider some XML or JSON format that includes typing to verify the transfer of data. Nov 18, 2018 at 18:40
23

Simple solution is to write just this:

HttpContext.Current.Response.Headers.Add("MaxRecords", "1000");
6
  • 5
    HttpContext would not be present in Controllers that derive ApiController.
    – ShellNinja
    May 3, 2019 at 13:35
  • 1
    This is indeed to right answer if we're talking about a .net framework controller that derive from system.web.http.apicontroller. I'm personally just familiar with the core syntax, so this was great for this legacy project. cheers Oct 28, 2020 at 13:51
  • 1
    This worked for me. My controller is inheriting from ApiController Mar 24, 2021 at 15:08
  • 1
    Absolute lifesaver in my legacy project.
    – Kit
    Oct 11, 2021 at 9:13
  • 1
    I used this in my class which derives from System.Web.Http.ApiController. (.NET Framework - 4.5.2.) Works perfectly.
    – Yossi G.
    Dec 27, 2021 at 17:45
14

What you need is:

public async Task<IHttpActionResult> Get() 
{ 
    var response = Request.CreateResponse();
    response.Headers.Add("Lorem", "ipsum");

    return base.ResponseMessage(response); 
}

I hope this answers your question.

13

Alternatively, it’s better to leverage DelegatingHandler if it is something you need to perform on every response. Because it will work on the request/response pipeline and not on the controller/action level. In my case I must add some headers with every response, so I did what I described. See code snippet below

public class Interceptor : DelegatingHandler
{
    protected async override Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        var response = await base.SendAsync(request, cancellationToken);
        response.Headers.Add("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
        response.Headers.Add("Access-Control-Allow-Methods", "GET,POST,PATCH,DELETE,PUT,OPTIONS");
        response.Headers.Add("Access-Control-Allow-Headers", "Origin, Content-Type, X-Auth-Token, content-type");
        return response;
    }

}

And you would be requiring to add this handler in WebApiConfig

    public static class WebApiConfig
    {
        public static void Register(HttpConfiguration config)
        {
            config.MessageHandlers.Add(new Interceptor());
        }
    } 
1
  • Four years later, and this is exactly what I am looking for presently.
    – bob.mazzo
    Oct 26, 2023 at 19:09
0

You can use a custom ActionFilter that will allow you to send custom headers and access the HttpContext:

public class AddCustomHeaderFilter : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public override void OnActionExecuted(HttpActionExecutedContext actionExecutedContext)
    {
       actionExecutedContext.Response.Content.Headers.Add("name", "value");
    }
}
3
  • But how would I get the "values" of the headers? Aug 14, 2015 at 20:46
  • 1
    Interesting Questions. It looks like you can set property Request.Properties["Count"] = "123" in controller and use it in the filter.
    – Yousuf
    Aug 14, 2015 at 21:03
  • 1
    In the filter, you can access it by actionContext.Request.Properties["Count"]
    – Yousuf
    Aug 14, 2015 at 21:05
0

You can do it now by the following code:

[HttpGet]
public IActionResult GetSomething() 
{
    HttpContext.Response.Headers.Add("x-my-custom-header", "custom header");
    return Ok();
}

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