4

Notice: the answer by aqueiros, although higher up voted, is not correct. Particularly this statement "vor.regions always has an empty array in the first index", is not true.


I'm generating a simple 2D Voronoi tessellation, using the scipy.spatial.Voronoi function. I use a random 2D distribution of points (see MCVE below).

I need a way to go through each defined region (defined by scipy.spatial.Voronoi) and get the coordinates of the point associated to it (ie: the point that said region encloses).

The issue is that there are N+1 regions (polygons) defined for the N points, and I'm not sure what this means.

Here's a MCVE that will fail when it gets to the last region:

from scipy.spatial import Voronoi
import numpy as np

# Generate random data.
N = 10
x = [np.random.random() for i in xrange(N)]
y = [np.random.random() for i in xrange(N)]
points = zip(x, y)

# Obtain Voronoi regions.
vor = Voronoi(points)

# Loop through each defined region/polygon
for i, reg in enumerate(vor.regions):

    print 'Region:', i
    print 'Indices of vertices of Voronoi region:', reg
    print 'Associated point:', points[i], '\n'

Another thing I don't understand is why are there empty vor.regions stored? According to the docs:

regions: Indices of the Voronoi vertices forming each Voronoi region. -1 indicates vertex outside the Voronoi diagram.

What does an empty region mean?


Add

I tried the point_region attribute but apparently I don't understand how it works. It returns indexes outside of the range of the points list. For example: in the MCVE above it will always show an index 10 for a list of 10 points, which is clearly out of range.

  • Voronoi instances have a point_region attribute that does exactly what you are after. Read the docs! – Jaime Aug 15 '15 at 0:18
  • 1
    @Jaime I did try that attribute, please see what I added to the question. – Gabriel Aug 16 '15 at 4:37
7

For your first question:

The issue is that there are N+1 regions (polygons) defined for the N points, and I'm not sure what this means.

This is because your vor.regions will always have an empty array. Something like

    [[],[0, 0],[0, 1],[1, 1]]

This is related to your second question:

Another thing I don't understand is why are there empty vor.regions stored? According to the docs: regions: Indices of the Voronoi vertices forming each Voronoi region. -1 indicates vertex outside the Voronoi diagram. What does an empty region mean?

By default Voronoi() uses QHull with options 'Qbb Qc Qz Qx' enabled (qhull.org/html/qvoronoi.htm). This inserts a "point-at-infinity" which is used to improve precision on circular inputs. Therefore, being a "fake" point, it has no region. If you want to get rid of this, try removing the Qz option:

vor = Voronoi(points, qhull_options='Qbb Qc Qx')
  • Welcome to StackOverflow. It would be good to add a little context for this answer --- code only answers are frowned upon. – jb. Jun 28 '16 at 10:02
  • Thank you for the tip @jb – aqueiros Jun 28 '16 at 22:08
  • 1
    @aqueiros sorry for the late response to your answer. 1) You say vor.regions always has an empty array in the first index . If you run the MCVE in my question several times, you'll see that the empty region is not always associated to the index 0. 2) My second question was about the existence of empty regions, not about the existence of regions with a -1 vertix. – Gabriel Jul 22 '16 at 13:41
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    @Gabriel Indeed, you are right. After a little more thorough inspection, here is why: By default Voronoi() uses QHull with options 'Qbb Qc Qz Qx' enabled (qhull.org/html/qvoronoi.htm). This inserts a "point-at-infinity" which is used to improve precision on circular inputs. Therefore, being a "fake" point, it has no region. If you want to get rid of this, do vor = Voronoi(points, qhull_options='Qbb Qc Qx') – aqueiros Dec 6 '16 at 10:03
  • @Gabriel, I edited the answer and removed the -1 stuff that you were not really asking about. Hope its clearer now. Cheers! – aqueiros Dec 6 '16 at 10:15
4

I was misreading the docs. It says:

point_region: Index of the Voronoi region for each input point.

and I was using point_region it as if it were the: "Index of the input point for each Voronoi region".

Instead of using:

points[i]

the correct point coordinates for each region can be obtained with:

np.where(vor.point_region == i)[0][0]
  • Did you figure out why certain regions are empty? This documentation says "Note here that due to similar numerical precision issues as in Delaunay triangulation above, there may be fewer Voronoi regions than input points." So I'm guessing that means qhull calculates Voronoi using Delaunay? And "such degeneracies can occur not only because of duplicated points, but also for more complicated geometrical reasons, even in point sets that at first sight seem well-behaved" – Nathan Dec 31 '18 at 18:14
  • But although I've seen how to hack around this problem, I'm still confused whether those solutions give you real answers or just keep "regions" from being empty. I will keep looking. Perhaps for my case I will just throw out the points that give empty regions – Nathan Dec 31 '18 at 18:15
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    Unfortunately it's been a while since I used Voronoi regions in my research and I ended up not actually using them, so I can not give you any insight into what's going on. Perhaps you could ask over at math.stackexchange.com since it would appear to be an issue related to the properties of Voronoi regions rather than its implementation in Scipy? – Gabriel Dec 31 '18 at 18:18
  • Thanks for your quick answer. I believe it's actually the opposite, haha. Voronoi should always have a region associated with a given point so long as that point is not a duplicate. It seems to have something to do with qhull's implementation – Nathan Dec 31 '18 at 18:24
  • I hope @aqueiros ' answer is correct, and these empty regions just belong to the points added at infinity – Nathan Dec 31 '18 at 18:28

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