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I'm using the Screen multiplexer tool on the command shell and open a lot of screens. I then forget which process ID associates with which task.

I would like to set a name for a screen, but I can't find an option in the man page.

Currently, listing the screens looks like this:

There are screens on:
    5422.pts-1.aws1 (Detached)
    5448.pts-1.aws1 (Detached)
    5027.pts-1.aws1 (Detached)
3 Sockets in /var/run/screen/S-sb.

And I would like to see something like this:

There are screens on:
    5422.logCleanWorker (Detached)
    5448.overNightLongTask(Detached)
    5027.databaseOverNightLongTask (Detached)
3 Sockets in /var/run/screen/S-sb.

How can I do this?

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  • 6
    the question looks more like it's asking "how to rename existing sessions" rather than "how to start new sessions with a name". In that context, the currently chosen answer is not really appropriate. The correct answer should rather be the one given by user164176 - stackoverflow.com/a/3309696/636762
    – Rakib
    Jun 12, 2016 at 16:05
  • The names of your screen sessions suggest that you create a new screen session per a single task (maybe a single command). Screen supports multiple windows, so you can run all these tasks in a single screen session.
    – Melebius
    Nov 30, 2017 at 7:51
  • 3
    Can this be migrated to SuperUser (or some other StackExchange site)? Obviously it's quite useful to a lot of people, though it's out of the scope of this particular site. Apr 19, 2018 at 6:04
  • 1
    if you find an option on this site to move it there with all the history, then I would agree moving it Apr 23, 2018 at 11:51

5 Answers 5

760

To start a new session

screen -S your_session_name

To rename an existing session

Ctrl+a, : sessionname YOUR_SESSION_NAME Enter

You must be inside the session

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  • 20
    This is the appropriate solution as it focuses on renaming the existing session rather than creating a new one.
    – thanos.a
    May 8, 2015 at 7:36
  • 5
    A quick note on C-a : syntax.... "All screen commands are prefixed by an escape key, by default C-a (that's Control-a, sometimes written ^a). To send a literal C-a to the programs in screen, use C-a a. This is useful when working with screen within screen. For example C-a a n will move screen to a new window on the screen within screen." (ref: aperiodic.net/screen/quick_reference ) Jul 8, 2016 at 16:12
  • Much appreciated. Even though I know you can start with a name, I often start without naming, then wish I could later. Thanks!
    – Ketzak
    Jul 31, 2017 at 18:40
  • 2
    agreed after looking at it a couple of years later :D Apr 17, 2018 at 9:52
  • 1
    Pro tip, you can type a prefix of the screenname, so instead of: screen -r myname, screen -r my will work (if it's a unique prefix).
    – gub
    May 16, 2019 at 20:49
600

To create a new screen with the name foo, use

screen -S foo

Then to reattach it, run

screen -r foo  # or use -x, as in
screen -x foo  # for "Multi display mode" (see the man page)
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  • 18
    In you solution you explain how to create new ones with correct names rather than changing the existing ones. There is none that wants to terminate the session if it is possible to keep it.
    – thanos.a
    May 8, 2015 at 7:36
  • 11
    Scroll down to user164176's answer to see how to rename existing sessions.
    – jlh
    Jan 27, 2016 at 10:44
  • 1
    the question looks more like it's asking "how to rename existing sessions" rather than "how to start new sessions with a name". In that context, the currently chosen answer is not really appropriate. The chosen correct answer should rather be the one given by user164176 - stackoverflow.com/a/3309696/636762 below
    – Rakib
    Jun 12, 2016 at 16:06
  • I searched "ubuntu create a new screen with name" on google and this was first result. Exactly what I was looking for :) thanks
    – Skylord123
    Mar 22, 2017 at 3:09
  • 1
    To rename a session: Ctrl+a, : sessionname YOUR_SESSION_NAME Enter.
    – Slake
    Apr 13, 2018 at 13:34
54

As already stated, screen -S SESSIONTITLE works for starting a session with a title (SESSIONTITLE), but if you start a session and later decide to change its title. This can be accomplished by using the default key bindings:

Ctrl+a, A

Which prompts:

Set windows title to:SESSIONTITLE

Change SESSIONTITLE by backspacing and typing in the desired title. To confirm the name change and list all titles.

Ctrl+a, "

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  • 43
    You are treating the terms session and window as interchangeable when they are not. Ctrl+a, A does not set the session name (SESSIONNAME), it only sets the current window title. Titles of windows within a session do not appear in the list of sessions when queried with screen -list. The question asks how to set the session name.
    – StvnW
    May 14, 2014 at 12:59
  • 6
    usefull but it changes current window title, not session name.
    – Znik
    Jan 9, 2015 at 14:25
16

The easiest way is to use Screen with a name:

screen -S 'name' 'application'
  • Ctrl + a, d = exit and leave the application open

Return to Screen:

screen -r 'name'

For example, using Lynx with Screen.

Create a screen:

screen -S lynx lynx

Ctrl+a, d = exit

Later, you can return with:

screen -r lynx
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  • 20
    Three problems with this. First, several people have already posted this. Second, you're telling him basic screen usage stuff he already knows. Third, you didn't actually answer the question, since he asked how to name an already-existing screen session.
    – Steely Dan
    Oct 31, 2012 at 13:41
0

I am a beginner to Screen, but I find it immensely useful while restoring lost connections.

Your question has already been answered, but this information might serve as an add on - I use PuTTY with PuTTY connection manager and name my screens - "tab1", "tab2", etc. - as for me the overall picture of the 8-10 tabs is more important than each individual tab name. I use the 8th tab for connecting to db, the 7th for viewing logs, etc. So when I want to reattach my screens I have written a simple wrapper which says:

#!/bin/bash
screen -d -r tab$1

where first argument is the tab number.

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  • 2
    This might be better done as a bash function.
    – Paul Price
    Sep 12, 2012 at 16:49

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