44

I'm using a Docker container for Django development, and the container runs Gunicorn with Nginx. I'd like code changes to auto-load, but the only way I can get them to load is by rebuilding with docker-compose (docker-compose build). The problem with "build" is that it re-runs all my pip installs.

I'm using the Gunicorn --reload flag, which is apparently supposed to do what I want. Here are my Docker config files:

## Dockerfile:
FROM python:3.4.3
RUN mkdir /code
WORKDIR /code
ADD . /code/
RUN pip install -r /code/requirements/docker.txt

## docker-compose.yml:
web:
  restart: always
  build: .
  expose:
    - "8000"
  links:
    - postgres:postgres
  volumes:
    - /usr/src/app/static
  env_file: .env
  command: /usr/local/bin/gunicorn myapp.wsgi:application -w 2 -b :8000 --reload

nginx:
  restart: always
  build: ./config/nginx
  ports:
    - "80:80"
  volumes:
    - /www/static
  volumes_from:
    - web
  links:
    - web:web

postgres:
  restart: always
  image: postgres:latest
  volumes:
    - /var/lib/postgresql
  ports:
    - "5432:5432"

I've tried some of the other Docker commands (docker-compose restart, docker-compose up), but the code won't refresh.

What am I missing?

  • do you have shared volume with your code? Can you post part of your docker-compose.yml to view the scenario? – kikicarbonell Aug 15 '15 at 6:23
  • I d not understand your "The problem with "build" is that it re-runs all my pip installs. " Maybe you can do first all the pip installs, so that docker build only loads code changes. Can you show your Dockerfile? You can also have a Dockerfile starting with FROM mypipinstalls – user2915097 Aug 15 '15 at 10:44
  • kikicarbonell, your question helped me realized I needed a volume for my code, and that appears to have fixed my issue, so thanks for leading me to the solution! – Dolan Antenucci Aug 15 '15 at 14:00
  • @user2915097, while I think I resolved my issue by adding the code volume, I am curious on what your suggesting. How would FROM mypipinstalls work (i.e., compared to what I'm doing now -- see above, I added my config files)? – Dolan Antenucci Aug 15 '15 at 14:01
39

Thanks to kikicarbonell, I looked into having a volume for my code, and after looking at the Docker Compose recommended Django setup, I added volumes: - .:/code to my web container in docker-compose.yml, and now any code changes I make automatically apply.

## docker-compose.yml:
web:
  restart: always
  build: .
  expose:
    - "8000"
  links:
    - postgres:postgres
  volumes:
    - /usr/src/app/static
    - .:/code
  env_file: .env
  command: /usr/local/bin/gunicorn myapp.wsgi:application -w 2 -b :8000 --reload

Update: for a thorough example of using Gunicorn and Django with Docker, checkout this example project from Rackspace, which also shows how to use docker-machine to launch the setup on remote servers like Rackspace Cloud.

Caveat: currently, this method does not work when your code is locally and the docker host is remote (e.g., on a cloud provider like Digital Ocean or Rackspace). This also applies to virtual machines if your local file system is not mounted on the VM. Note that there are separate volume drivers (e.g., flocker), and there might be something out there to address this need. For now, the "fix" is to rsync/scp your files up to a directory on the remote docker host. Then, the --reload flag will auto-reload gunicorn after any scp/rsync. Update: If pushing code to remove docker host, I find it far easier to just rebuild the docker container (e.g., docker-compose build web && docker-compose up -d). This can be slower though than the rsync approach if your src folder is large.

  • I thought inotify didn't work with Docker volumes. github.com/docker/docker/issues/18246 Any idea why this works? – Eric Ihli Sep 9 '16 at 7:10
  • 2
    @EricIhli -- This method does not work when the docker host is remote (because the volume declarations in the Compose file are with respect to the docker host). I've updated my answer with a disclaimer clarifying this. – Dolan Antenucci Sep 9 '16 at 13:26
  • 1
    Ah. Thanks. I did solve my problem of needing to watch file changes and do some action inside a container by using 'fswatch' on Mac, piping through to 'xargs', and running 'docker exec <container> <command>', in case anyone else is looking for that. – Eric Ihli Sep 15 '16 at 5:18
  • I am seeing an intermittent behaviour on my Mac (both Docker and Django are local). Sometimes it auto-reloads, sometimes it doesn't, which makes development really difficult. Anyone seen this behaviour before? @EricIhli – Anupam Jan 5 '18 at 6:20
26

You have another problem- Docker caches each layer that it builds. You shouldn't have to re-run pip install every time!

ADD . /code/
RUN pip install -r /code/requirements/docker.txt

This is your problem- Docker checks every ADD statement to see if any files have changed and invalidates the cache for it and every later step if it has. The correct way to do this is...

ADD ./requirements/docker.txt /code/requirements/
RUN pip install -r /code/requirements/docker.txt
ADD ./code/

Which will only invalidate your pip install line if your requirements file changes!

  • 2
    I was wondering why the ADD was redundant. Thanks for letting me know – Dolan Antenucci Aug 15 '15 at 21:32
1

Since I never found a desirable solution consider this interesting hack. Posting here I wanted to see if anyone has similar/good/bad experiences with this "work around".

To make code reload locally for development I simply created a View that immediately calls exit(). The exit will crash Django and a reload will occur where code changes are available. The reboot takes a fraction of a second and can be done via a tab in the browser, a requests.get call, or any other similar call. The reload is not automatic but it does skip any Docker lag such as a restart.

When the exit is called you will see the PID increment (if tailing logs):

web    | [2019-07-15 18:29:52 +0000] [22] [INFO] Worker exiting (pid: 22)
web    | [2019-07-15 18:29:52 +0000] [24] [INFO] Booting worker with pid: 24

I hope this helps others and/or gets feed back on this approach.

  • 1
    If you're using gunicorn for your local development, the --reload flag will use your latest code automatically, assuming your local code is being read from a shared volume between docker and your local box. If you're having issues with this setup and want to pursue it further, I'm happy to help you debug the issue, but you should start a new question and link back in these comments. – Dolan Antenucci Jul 15 '19 at 20:33
  • @DolanAntenucci Thanks for the response. Every project is set up different, so --reload is not always an option. This "work around" may help others patch a bad situation. – Marc Jul 15 '19 at 21:46
  • 1
    @DolanAntenucci, follow up - I did some testing on the flag and it is generally reliable, but not 100%. I feel like ~1 in 10 times the code did not update and I needed to use an alternative. The Docker set up (inherited) may be causing interference, not sure but again thanks b/c in this project --reload generally works. – Marc Jul 16 '19 at 18:14
  • 1
    Thanks for the update. I do recall having --reload not 100%, but I forget if there was a particular situation where it didn't work. Actually, in Celery workers would be one example; that requires a restart – Dolan Antenucci Jul 16 '19 at 20:24
  • Docker is not a standard, so I am glad to have an alternative. Celery does require "code reload" as it is a background application interfacing w/the Python code, I remember in VENV and PIPENV needing to restart that service for code edits, love to get that improved, but the inconvenience is low. – Marc Jul 16 '19 at 20:40
0

I faced very similar problem trying to configure auto-reload of the project with a little bit different setup. I set up volumes but it did not work anyway. After an hour of googling and thorough examination of my code I figured out that volume paths in Dockerfile and docker-compose.yml simply do not match. Make sure that they are the same.

My Dockerfile

FROM python:3.6.9-alpine3.10

COPY ./requirements/local.txt /app/requirements/local.txt

RUN set -ex \
    && apk add --no-cache --virtual .build-deps postgresql-dev git gcc libgcc musl-dev jpeg-dev zlib-dev build-base \
    && python -m venv /env \
    && /env/bin/pip install --upgrade pip \
    && /env/bin/pip install --no-cache-dir -r /app/requirements/local.txt \
    && runDeps="$(scanelf --needed --nobanner --recursive /env \
        | awk '{ gsub(/,/, "\nso:", $2); print "so:" $2 }' \
        | sort -u \
        | xargs -r apk info --installed \
        | sort -u)" \
    && apk add --virtual rundeps $runDeps \
    && apk del .build-deps

### Here is the path to the project
COPY . /app

WORKDIR /app/project

ENV VIRTUAL_ENV /env
ENV PATH /env/bin:$PATH
ENV PYTHONDONTWRITEBYTECODE 1
ENV PYTHONUNBUFFERED 1

EXPOSE 8088

My docker-compose.yml

version: '3'


services:

  web:
    build:
      context: ../..
      dockerfile: compose/local/Dockerfile
    restart: on-failure
    command: python manage.py runserver 0.0.0.0:8088 --settings=project.settings.local
    volumes:
      # - .:/var/www/app  # messed up path
      - .:/app  # correct path
    env_file:
      - ../../.env.local
    depends_on:
      - db
    ports:
      - "8000:8000"

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