How can I calculate a number with an exponent in Elixir?

For example, 23 would return 8.

Use the Erlang :math module

:math.pow(2,3) #=> 8.0

If you want an integer:

:math.pow(2,3) |> round #=> 8

Erlang's :math.pow has some limitations, for example it will not allow really high integer powers:

iex(10)> :math.pow(2, 10000)
** (ArithmeticError) bad argument in arithmetic expression

You can easily reimplement a fast algorithm for computing powers that will work with the arbitrarily large integers provided by the runtime:

defmodule Pow do
  require Integer

  def pow(_, 0), do: 1
  def pow(x, n) when Integer.is_odd(n), do: x * pow(x, n - 1)
  def pow(x, n) do
    result = pow(x, div(n, 2))
    result * result
  end
end

iex(9)> Pow.pow(2, 10000)
19950631168807583848837421626835850838234968318861924548520089498529438830...

Here is a tail call optimized implementation of the power function:

def  pow(n, k), do: pow(n, k, 1)        
defp pow(_, 0, acc), do: acc
defp pow(n, k, acc), do: pow(n, k - 1, n * acc)
  • 1
    Very nice! Would be nice to replace :math.pow's current implementation with an Erlang translation of this. github.com/erlang/otp – Nathan Long May 19 '17 at 17:45

Tis works - it will be great when I learn enough to know exactly why it works - probably something to do with eval under the covers:

defmodule Example do
  require Integer

  def do_it(list) do
    list
    |> Enum.reject(&Integer.is_odd(&1))
    |> Enum.map(&(:math.pow(&1,3)))
  end

end

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