31

I want to do some tests which require some strings with the same hash code, but not the same strings. I couldn't find any examples, so I decided to write a simple program to do it for me.

The code below generates two random strings over and over until they generate the same hash code.

    static Random r = new Random();
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string str1, str2;
        do
        {
            str1 = GenerateString();
            str2 = GenerateString();
        } while (str1.GetHashCode() != str2.GetHashCode() && str1 != str2);

        Console.WriteLine("{0}\n{1}", str1, str2);
    }

    static string GenerateString()
    {
        string s = "";
        while (s.Length < 6)
        {
            s += (char)r.Next(char.MaxValue);
        }
        return s;
    }

This code seems to be working (theoretically), but it may take centuries to complete. So I was thinking of doing vice versa and generate two strings from one hash code.

I know it's not possible to retrieve a string from a hash code, but is it possible to generate possible strings from it?

I'm using Visual Studio 2015 Community Edition. Version: 14.0.23107.0D14REL.

.NET Framework: 4.6.00081.

  • 2
    If you want just for a test, you can create a class and override GetHashCode with a bad implementation that returns a fixed value, effectively producing collisions everywhere. – Alejandro Aug 15 '15 at 17:25
  • 9
    It takes just a few seconds, the Birthday Paradox makes it quick. "1241308".GetHashCode() == "699391".GetHashCode() in 32-bit code, "942".GetHashCode() == "9331582".GetHashCode() in 64-bit code. – Hans Passant Aug 15 '15 at 17:34
  • 4
    Taking advantage of the birthday paradox is done by storing all of the strings you've generated so far. Each time you generate a new one you check it against all of the others. It increases the chances of finding a match enormously. If there are N hash codes then your method will have a 50% chance of finding a collision after checking N/2 strings. The birthday method will have a 50% chance after checking √N strings. For 32-bit hash codes where N=~4 billion, this is the difference between checking 2 billion strings or 65 thousand of them. – John Kugelman Aug 15 '15 at 17:45
  • 1
    @ScottChamberlain: That's not true. The math only applies if the hash-values are approximately uniformly-random. If they are not, you can easily need many more hashes to find a collision (ex. hash(x) = x%INT_MAX, you'd iterate over INT_MAX values before finding a collision). – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Aug 15 '15 at 23:06
  • 1
    If you are using 64 bits, you can just use "\0Anything" and "\0Really, anything will work."- Why is String.GetHashCode() implemented differently in 32-bit and 64-bit versions of the CLR?. Of course, it is better to look for these strings for you current implementation - \0 will not always work. – Kobi Aug 16 '15 at 5:16
32

Finding two strings by repeatedly comparing random strings will take practically forever. Instead generate strings and store them in an a dictionary by hashcode. Then look up each. Match found pretty quickly.

MATCH FOUND!! xqzrbn and krumld hash code 80425224

void Main()
{

    var lookup = new Dictionary<int,string>();

    while(true) {
        var s = RandomString();        
        var h = s.GetHashCode();
        string s2;
        if (lookup.TryGetValue(h, out s2) && s2 != s) {
            Console.WriteLine("MATCH FOUND!! {0} and {1} hash code {2}",
                lookup[h],
                s,
                h);
            break;
        }
        lookup[h] = s;

        if (lookup.Count % 1000 == 0) {
            Console.WriteLine(lookup.Count);
        }
    }
}

static Random r = new Random();

// Define other methods and classes here
static string RandomString() {

    var s = ((char)r.Next((int)'a',((int)'z')+1)).ToString() +
            ((char)r.Next((int)'a',((int)'z')+1)).ToString() +
            ((char)r.Next((int)'a',((int)'z')+1)).ToString() +
            ((char)r.Next((int)'a',((int)'z')+1)).ToString() +
            ((char)r.Next((int)'a',((int)'z')+1)).ToString() +
            ((char)r.Next((int)'a',((int)'z')+1)).ToString();

    return s;
}
  • Thanks for the answer. @ScottChamberlain and SamuelNeff. it seems the method generating the string also affects the chances! more characters reduces the chance to get same hashcode. – M.kazem Akhgary Aug 15 '15 at 17:56
  • 1
    @M.kazemAkhgary That's not true, You feel that way because the alpha method uses a lot more CPU power dus taking longer to find a match. the number of items should be the same. – Behrooz Aug 15 '15 at 20:18
  • 1
    @Behrooz The only way a dictionary can "crawl" is if you store lots of values that have the exact same HashCode but Equals( returns false. Using a int it is impossible to have (x.GetHashCode() == y.GetHashCode()) && (x.Equals(y) == false) – Scott Chamberlain Aug 15 '15 at 21:25
  • 1
    @Behrooz See this old answer of mine where I go in to the process in more detail than a comment will allow. – Scott Chamberlain Aug 16 '15 at 0:02
  • 1
    @Behrooz note O(1) does not mean fast, it means constant time. It can be constantly slow and still be O(1). That's not to say a dictionary is slow, just saying in general. Performance of a dictionary depends on the number of buckets and distribution of keys across buckets (randomness of hashcode). – Samuel Neff Aug 16 '15 at 0:29
25

Take advantage of the Birthday Paradox. Instead of only testing two strings directly, test all strings you have seen before.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var words = new Dictionary<int, string>();

            int i = 0;
            string teststring;
            while (true)
            {
                i++;
                teststring = i.ToString();
                try
                {
                    words.Add(teststring.GetHashCode(), teststring);
                }
                catch (Exception)
                {
                    break;
                }
            }

            var collisionHash = teststring.GetHashCode();
            Console.WriteLine("\"{0}\" and \"{1}\" have the same hash code {2}", words[collisionHash], teststring, collisionHash);
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

For my machine it produces the output

"699391" and "1241308" have the same hash code -1612916492

almost instantly.

Due to how strings are hashed in .NET you may not get the exact same output as me, but it should be just as fast.

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