Trying to figure-out how to find something that functional exactly like async.eachSeries, i need a list of async actions run in sequence (not in parallel) but can't find a way to do it in native ES6, can anyone advise, please?

p.s. thought about generators/yield but don't have the experience yet so I'm not realized how exactly it can help me.

Edit 1

per request, here is an example:

Assume this code:

let model1 = new MongooseModel({prop1: "a", prop2: "b"});
let model2 = new MongooseModel({prop1: "c", prop2: "d"});

let arr = [model1 , model2];

Now, I want to run over it in a series, not parallel, so with the "async" NPM it's easy:

async.eachSeries(arr, (model, next)=>{
    model.save.then(next).catch(next);
}, err=>{
    if(err) return reject(error);
    resolve();
})

My question is: with ES6, can I do it natively? without the NPM 'async' package?

Edit 2

With async/await it can be done easily:

let model1 = new MongooseModel({prop1: "a", prop2: "b"});
let model2 = new MongooseModel({prop1: "c", prop2: "d"});    

let arr = [model1 , model2];

for(let model of arr){
    await model.save();
}
  • You mean, the second function depends on the result of the first function? – thefourtheye Aug 15 '15 at 19:43
  • It's not must be depend on it but must run after the previous has done. – Shlomi Sasson Aug 15 '15 at 19:57
  • You should give an example and state the sample input and expected output, to explain the problem properly. – thefourtheye Aug 15 '15 at 20:00
  • Added an example, thank you! – Shlomi Sasson Aug 15 '15 at 20:12

For those who like short answers:

[func1, func2].reduce((p, f) => p.then(f), Promise.resolve());
  • 1
    why the Promise.resolve() at the second parameter? – Shlomi Sasson Aug 17 '15 at 5:49
  • 4
    The second parameter is the initial value of the reduction. E.g. this particular example is equivalent to Promise.resolve().then(func1).then(func2). – jib Aug 17 '15 at 12:29
  • 2
    You're a magician. Exactly what I needed. – Mario Tacke Jan 6 '17 at 0:42
  • 1
    Thanks, where would you put the code that will execute when the last promise resolves? – SSH This Feb 7 '17 at 16:02
  • 7
    I just had a tiny orgasm – cuttlas Feb 11 '17 at 9:54

Let's say you want to call some async function on an array of data and you want them called sequentially, not in parallel.

The interface for async.eachSeries() is like this:

eachSeries(arr, iterator, [callback])

Here's how to simulate that with promises:

// define helper function that works kind of like async.eachSeries
function eachSeries(arr, iteratorFn) {
    return arr.reduce(function(p, item) {
        return p.then(function() {
            return iteratorFn(item);
        });
    }, Promise.resolve());
}

This assumes that iteratorFn takes the item to process as an argument and that it returns a promise.

Here's a usage example (that assumes you have a promisified fs.readFileAsync()) and have a function called speak() that returns a promise when done:

 var files = ["hello.dat", "goodbye.dat", "genericgreeting.dat"];
 eachSeries(files, function(file) {
     return fs.readFileAsync(file).then(function(data) {
         return speak(data);
     });
 });

This lets the promise infrastructure sequence everything for you.


It is also possible for you to sequence things manually (though I'm not sure why):

function eachSeries(arr, iteratorFn) {
    return new Promise(resolve, reject) {
        var index = 0;

        function next() {
            if (index < arr.length) {
                try {
                    iteratorFn(arr[index++]).then(next, reject);
                } catch(e) {
                    reject(e);
                }
            } else {
                resolve();
            }
        }
        // kick off first iteration
        next();
    });
}

Or, a simpler version that manually chains the promises together:

function eachSeries(arr, iteratorFn) {
    var index = 0;

    function next() {
        if (index < arr.length) {
            return iteratorFn(arr[index++]).then(next);
        }
    }
    return Promise.resolve().then(next);
}

Note how one of the manual versions has to surround iteratorFn() with try/catch in order to make sure it is throw-safe (convert exceptions into a rejection). .then() is automatically throw safe so the other schemes don't have to manually catch exceptions since .then() already catches them for you.

  • 1
    Concise and elegant. – Jared Smith Aug 15 '15 at 20:09
  • 1
    @Startec - .reduce() accepts two arguments. The first is a function, the second is the initial value of what you are reducing. Promise.resolve() is producing that initial value. The callback you pass is then called with two arguments. The first argument is the current value in the reduction. I've named that p in my code and it's initial value will be the Promise.resolve(). Subsequent values will be the return value of my callback return p.then(...) which is another promise. The second argument to the callback is the next value in the array that we are reducing. – jfriend00 Nov 15 '16 at 6:49
  • 1
    @Startec - See here on MDN for doc on .reduce(). You call it like this: var reducedValue = array.reduce(fn, initialValue). My Promise.resolve() is that initialValue. It's just a way to start a promise chain by initializing it to an already resolved promise. It's kind of like Promise.resolve().then(fn1).then(fn2).then(fn3). – jfriend00 Nov 15 '16 at 6:50
  • 1
    @Startec - When you factor in proper error handling and potential nested operations, promises are hands-down the best way to manage things. Plus they are the core of async and await in ES7 so they are the future of the language too. If I wanted to sequence through an array asynchronously, I'd use something like Promise.mapSeries() in the Bluebird promise library which is the library I generally use to add extended promise capabilities. – jfriend00 Nov 15 '16 at 8:02
  • 1
    @Startec - Perhaps you should post a question with a good description of what you're trying to do and ask how the best way to do it with Promises is. I can't see your actual problem in my head from just the words you're using so it would be better to see your code and then folks could offer better/different ways to do it. I've never found a situation where using promises needed more code than not using promises. Like with many things there are good ways to write promise code and not so good ways. – jfriend00 Nov 15 '16 at 8:56

As an extension to the answer provided by @jib... you can also map an array of items to async functions like so:

[item1, item2]
    .map(item => async (prev_result) => await something_async(item))
    .reduce((p, f) => p.then(f), Promise.resolve())
    .then(() => console.log('all done'));

Notice how prev_result will be the value returned by the previous evaluation of something_async, this is roughly equivalent to a hybrid between async.eachSeries and async.waterfall.

You can chain by returning in the then callback. For instance:

new Promise(function(resolve, reject){ 
  resolve(1)
}).then(function(v){
  console.log(v);
  return v + 1;
}).then(function(v){
  console.log(v)
});

Will print:

1
2

This of course work when asynchronously resolving promises:

new Promise(function(resolve, reject){
  setTimeout(function(){
    resolve(1);
  }, 1000)
}).then(function(result){
   return new Promise(function(resolve, reject){
     setTimeout(function(){
       console.log(result);
       resolve(result + 1);
     }, 1000)
   });
}).then(function(results){
  console.log(results);
});

Printing:

1
2

  • Thanks, but i need it for a dynamic collection of data, not for some static known amount of iterations.. – Shlomi Sasson Aug 15 '15 at 19:56
  • @ShlomiSasson It's just an example. All then does is return a promise, you pass callbacks and create promises as needed. – Kit Sunde Aug 15 '15 at 19:57
  • Kit, so what you say is to create a recursive function that attach more and more callbacks to the "then" method? – Shlomi Sasson Aug 15 '15 at 19:59
  • 1
    @ShlomiSasson Well you'd don't have to recurse, just what jfriend00 has done with reduce. There's a ES7 proposal to make this particular case easier btw: github.com/lukehoban/ecmascript-asyncawait – Kit Sunde Aug 15 '15 at 20:08

//Uploading this for systems that run lower nodejs version (Azure :/) Not the shortest but the nicest i can think of

for example lets say "functionWithPromise" returns some promise and expects some item.

functionWithPromise(item);

promisesArray =[];

//syncornized
itemsArray.forEach(function (item){
   promisesArray.push(functionWithPromise(item));
});

Promise.all(promisesArray).then(function (values){
//profit
});

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