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While I was writing a bit of CSS, a situation that I have never encountered before using the :nth-child(n) appeared and I was doubt of what is actually happening.

When I use pseudo classes, I write them without a space between the selector, like so:

div#wrap:hover {
    border-bottom: 2px solid orange;
}
/* OR */
div#wrap:nth-child(4) {
    border-bottom: 2px solid orange;
}

But it didn't work the way I expected, so I tried inserting a space between the selector and the pseudo class. Surprisingly, it worked:

div#wrap :nth-child(4) {
    border-bottom: 2px solid orange;
}

What is happening to make this work?

div#wrap :nth-child(4) {
  border-bottom: 2px solid orange;
}
<div id="wrap">
  <h1>Heading 1</h1>
  <p>This is a test!</p>
  <h2>Creating content</h2>
  <p>The next paragraph uses the <strong>.html</strong> method to create a new element.</p>
</div>

  • 1
    Consider this: if div#wrap:hover refers to div#wrap while it is hovered, then you would not expect the meaning of the selector to change dramatically simply by swapping out :hover for :nth-child() without making any other changes to the selector. To wit, div#wrap:nth-child(4) means div#wrap when it is the 4th child element. – BoltClock Aug 15 '15 at 22:35
5

You're misunderstanding the selector. It selects the element preceding .element:nth-child(n) which is the nth child of its parent.

When there is no selector preceding, it defaults to *:nth-child(n)

Because you probably only want to apply this to direct descendants and not every element which is the fourth child of its parent and a descendant of the parent, I would use .element > *:nth-child(n) to only apply to direct descendants.

div#wrap > *:nth-child(4) {
  border-bottom: 2px solid orange;
}

div#wrap > *:nth-child(4) {
  border-bottom: 2px solid orange;
}
<div id="wrap">
  <h1>Heading 1</h1>
  <p>This is a test!</p>
  <h2>Creating content</h2>
  <p>The next paragraph uses the <strong>.html</strong> method to create a new element.</p>
</div>

If you wanted to be more specific and only select the fourth child if it is a <p> element, you can use .element > p:nth-child(n). This will select all <p> elements that are the fourth direct descendant of elements matching the div#wrap selector.

div#wrap > p:nth-child(4) {
  border-bottom: 2px solid orange;
}

div#wrap > p:nth-child(4) {
  border-bottom: 2px solid orange;
}
<div id="wrap">
  <h1>Heading 1</h1>
  <p>This is a test!</p>
  <h2>Creating content</h2>
  <p>The next paragraph uses the <strong>.html</strong> method to create a new element.</p>
</div>

If you want to select the second <p> element directly descending from each div#wrap, you can use .element > p:nth-of-type(n) like so:

div#wrap > p:nth-of-type(2) {
  border-bottom: 2px solid orange;
}

div#wrap > p:nth-of-type(2) {
  border-bottom: 2px solid orange;
}
<div id="wrap">
  <h1>Heading 1</h1>
  <p>This is a test!</p>
  <h2>Creating content</h2>
  <p>The next paragraph uses the <strong>.html</strong> method to create a new element.</p>
</div>

1

A space in a CSS selector means the next part is a descendant (not direct descendant) of what was previously selected.

tr td means a <td> inside a <tr>.
table td means a <td> inside a <table>.

In your case, the :nth-child() pseudo-class is applied after the <div> so it matches for the nth (4th...) child of that div. Had you removed the space, it would match a the 4th div with id "wrap" (which doesn't exist)

1

What does the space do?

Space before :nth-child(4) is equal to *:nth-child(4). * is a global CSS selector. So if any child element which is 4th in the list of elements of any parent, the CSS rules are applied to that element.

But using #wrap before the nth-child will limit the scope of the selection within the #wrap element.

Alternate Solution(Understanding how nth-child works):

You can also use: p:nth-child(4) which targets the paragraph element which is 4th with respect to the parent element which is #wrap.

:nth-child will select irrespective of whatever the element is, or what the sibling elements are. You will need to use :nth-of-type to differentiate.

* {
  font-family: Helvetica;
}
p:nth-child(4) {
  border-bottom: 2px solid orange;
}
p:nth-of-type(2) {
  background: lightblue;
  color: #fff;
}
<div id="wrap">
  <h1>Heading 1</h1>
  <p>This is a test!</p>
  <h2>Creating content</h2>
  <p>The next paragraph uses the <strong>.html</strong> method to create a new element.</p>
</div>

  • Right, however how come 'p:nth-child(4)' works in this case? Doesn't that mean that its selecting the 4th paragraph tag? (which does not exist) Thank you for your help. – csalmeida Aug 16 '15 at 0:26
  • 1
    No :nth-child will select irrespective of what the element is, or what the sibling elements are. You will need to use nth-of-type to differentiate. Check my updated code. – Manoj Kumar Aug 16 '15 at 6:42
  • Now I get it! Thank you for your help. – csalmeida Aug 16 '15 at 13:29
  • You are welcome! :) – Manoj Kumar Aug 16 '15 at 15:19

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