As JPA requires, @Entity classes should have a default (non-arg) constructor to instantiate the objects when retrieving them from the database.

In Kotlin, properties are very convenient to declare within the primary constructor, as in the following example:

class Person(val name: String, val age: Int) { /* ... */ }

But when the non-arg constructor is declared as a secondary one it requires values for the primary constructor to be passed, so some valid values are needed for them, like here:

@Entity
class Person(val name: String, val age: Int) {
    private constructor(): this("", 0)
}

In case when the properties have some more complex type than just String and Int and they're non-nullable, it looks totally bad to provide the values for them, especially when there's much code in primary constructor and init blocks and when the parameters are actively used -- when they're to be reassigned through reflection most of the code is going to be executed again.

Moreover, val-properties cannot be reassigned after the constructor executes, so immutability is also lost.

So the question is: how can Kotlin code be adapted to work with JPA without code duplication, choosing "magic" initial values and loss of immutability?

P.S. Is it true that Hibernate aside of JPA can construct objects with no default constructor?

  • 1
    INFO -- org.hibernate.tuple.PojoInstantiator: HHH000182: No default (no-argument) constructor for class: Test (class must be instantiated by Interceptor) – so, yes, Hibernate can work without the default constructor. – Michael Piefel Feb 13 '17 at 9:28
  • The way it does it is with setters - aka: Mutability. It instantiates the default constructor and then looks for setters. I want immutable objects. The only way that can be done is if hibernates starts looking at the constructor. There is an open ticket on this hibernate.atlassian.net/browse/HHH-9440 – Christian Bongiorno Feb 8 at 7:54
up vote 84 down vote accepted

As of Kotlin 1.0.6, the kotlin-noarg compiler plugin generates synthetic default construtors for classes that have been annotated with selected annotations.

If you use gradle, applying the kotlin-jpa plugin is enough to generate default constructors for classes annotated with @Entity:

buildscript {
    dependencies {
        classpath "org.jetbrains.kotlin:kotlin-noarg:$kotlin_version"
    }
}

apply plugin: "kotlin-jpa"

For Maven:

<plugin>
    <artifactId>kotlin-maven-plugin</artifactId>
    <groupId>org.jetbrains.kotlin</groupId>
    <version>${kotlin.version}</version>

    <configuration>
        <compilerPlugins>
            <plugin>jpa</plugin>
        </compilerPlugins>
    </configuration>

    <dependencies>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.jetbrains.kotlin</groupId>
            <artifactId>kotlin-maven-noarg</artifactId>
            <version>${kotlin.version}</version>
        </dependency>
    </dependencies>
</plugin>
  • 2
    Could you perhaps expand a bit on how this would be used within your kotlin code, even if it's a case of "your data class foo(bar: String) doesn't change". It'd just be nice to see a more complete example of how this fits into place. Thanks – thecoshman Feb 8 '17 at 22:56
  • You don't have to do anything in your code. Classes that are annotated with @Entity will get a default constructor automatically with the above configuration. – Ingo Kegel Feb 9 '17 at 7:01
  • 2
    This is the blog post that introduced kotlin-noarg and kotlin-jpa with links detailing their purpose blog.jetbrains.com/kotlin/2016/12/kotlin-1-0-6-is-here – Dalibor Filus May 12 '17 at 15:32
  • Yeah but what about @Embeddable class... – kboom Sep 30 '17 at 6:18
  • And what about a primary key class like CustomerEntityPK, which is not an entity but needs a default constructor? – jannnik Dec 28 '17 at 17:27

just provide default values for all arguments, Kotlin will make default constructor for you.

@Entity
data class Person(val name: String="", val age: Int=0)

see the NOTE box below the following section:

https://kotlinlang.org/docs/reference/classes.html#secondary-constructors

  • 6
    you obviously didn't read his question, else you would have seen the part where he states that default arguments are bad looking, especially for more complex objects. Not to mention, adding default values for something hides other issues. – snowe Dec 1 '16 at 23:26
  • 1
    Why is it bad idea to provide the default values? Even when using Java's no args consturctor, default values are assigned to the fields (e.g. null to reference types). – Umesh Rajbhandari Dec 21 '16 at 2:53
  • 1
    There are times for which you can not provide a sensible defaults. Take the given example of a person, you really should model it with a date of birth as that doesn't change (of course, exceptions apply somewhere somehow) but there is no sensible default to give to that. Hence form a pure code point of view, you must pass a DoB into the person constructor, thus ensuring you can never have a person that doesn't have a valid age. The problem is, the way JPA likes to work, it likes to make an object with a no-args constructor, then set everything. – thecoshman Feb 8 '17 at 22:54
  • I think this is the right way to do that, this answer works in other cases that you don't use JPA or hibernate too. also it's the suggested way according to documents as mentioned in the answer. – Mohammad Rafigh Jul 18 '17 at 14:25

@D3xter has a good answer for one model, the other is a newer feature in Kotlin called lateinit:

class Entity() {
    constructor(name: String, age: Date): this() {
        this.name = name
        this.birthdate = age
    }

    lateinit var name: String
    lateinit var birthdate: Date
}

You would use this when you are sure something will fill in the values at construction time or very soon after (and before first use of the instance).

You will note I changed age to birthdate because you cannot use primitive values with lateinit and they also for the moment must be var (restriction might be released in the future).

So not a perfect answer for immutability, same problem as the other answer in that regard. The solution for that is plugins to libraries that can handle understanding the Kotlin constructor and mapping properties to constructor parameters, instead of requiring a default constructor. The Kotlin module for Jackson does this, so it is clearly possible.

See also: https://stackoverflow.com/a/34624907/3679676 for exploration of similar options.

  • Worth note that lateinit and Delegates.notNull() are the same. – fasth Feb 9 '16 at 11:09
  • 4
    similar but not the same. If Delegate is used, it changes what is seen for serialization of the actual field by Java (it sees the delegate class). Also, it is better to use lateinit when you have a well defined lifecycle guaranteeing initialization soon after construction, it is intended for those cases. Whereas delegate is more intended for "sometime before first use". Although technically they have similar behavior and protection, they aren't identical. – Jayson Minard Feb 9 '16 at 16:57
@Entity data class Person(/*@Id @GeneratedValue var id: Long? = null,*/
                          var name: String? = null,
                          var age: Int? = null)

Initial values are requires if you want reuse constructor for different fields, kotlin doesn't allowed nulls. So whenever you planning omit field, use this form in constructor: var field: Type? = defaultValue

jpa required no argument constructor:

val entity = Person() // Person(name=null, age=null)

there is no code duplication. If you need construct entity and only setup age, use this form:

val entity = Person(age = 33) // Person(name=null, age=33)

there is no magic (just read documentation)

  • 1
    While this code snippet may solve the question, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion. – DimaSan Mar 25 '17 at 21:38
  • @DimaSan, you are right, but that thread already have explanations in some posts... – Maksim Kostromin Apr 16 '17 at 23:51
  • But your snippet is different and though may have a different description, anyway now it is much clearer. – DimaSan Apr 17 '17 at 0:23
  • Solved for me by using this null trick – Oussaki Oct 23 '17 at 12:29

There is no way to keep immutability like this. Vals MUST be initialized when constructing the instance.

One way to do it without immutability is:

class Entity() {
    public constructor(name: String, age: Int): this() {        
        this.name = name
        this.age = age
    }

    public var name: String by Delegates.notNull()

    public var age: Int by Delegates.notNull()
}
  • So there's even no way to tell Hibernate to map columns to the constructor args? Well, may be, there's an ORM framework/library which doesn't require non-arg constructor? :) – hotkey Aug 16 '15 at 22:49
  • Not sure about that, haven't worked with Hibernate for a long time. But it should be possible somehow to implement with named parameters. – D3xter Aug 17 '15 at 15:39
  • I think hibernate could do this with a bit (not much) of work. In java 8 you can actually have you parameters named in the constructor and those could be mapped just like they are to fields now. – Christian Bongiorno Jun 4 '17 at 5:36

I have been working with Kotlin + JPA for quite a while and I have created my own idea how to write Entity classes.

I just slightly extend your initial idea. As you said we can create private argumentless constructor and provide default values for primitives, but when we try need to use another classes it gets a little messy. My idea is to create static STUB object for entity class that you currently writes e.g:

@Entity
data class TestEntity(
    val name: String,
    @Id @GeneratedValue val id: Int? = null
) {
    private constructor() : this("")

    companion object {
        val STUB = TestEntity()
    }
}

and when I have entity class that is related to TestEntity I can easily use stub I just have created. For example:

@Entity
data class RelatedEntity(
        val testEntity: TestEntity,
        @Id @GeneratedValue val id: Long? = null
) {
    private constructor() : this(TestEntity.STUB)

    companion object {
        val STUB = RelatedEntity()
    }
}

Of course this solution is not perfect. You still need to create some boilerplate code that should not be required. Also there is one case that cannot be solved nicely with stubbing - parent-child relation within one entity class - like this:

@Entity
data class TestEntity(
        val testEntity: TestEntity,
        @Id @GeneratedValue val id: Long? = null
) {
    private constructor() : this(STUB)

    companion object {
        val STUB = TestEntity()
    }
}

This code will produce NullPointerException due to chicken-egg issue - we need STUB to create STUB. Unfortunately we need to make this field nullable (or some similar solution) to make code works.

Also in my opinion having Id as last field (and nullable) is quite optimal. We shouldn't assign it by hand and let database do it for us.

I'm not saying that this is perfect solution, but I think that it leverages entity code readability and Kotlin features (e.g. null safety). I just hope future releases of JPA and/or Kotlin will make our code even more simpler and nicer.

Similar to @pawelbial I've used companion object to create a default instance, however instead of defining a secondary constructor, just use default constructor args like @iolo. This saves you having to define multiple constructors and keeps the code simpler (although granted, defining "STUB" companion objects isn't exactly keeping it simple)

@Entity
data class TestEntity(
    val name: String = "",
    @Id @GeneratedValue val id: Int? = null
) {

    companion object {
        val STUB = TestEntity()
    }
}

And then for classes which relate to TestEntity

@Entity
data class RelatedEntity(
    val testEntity: TestEntity = TestEntity:STUB,
    @Id @GeneratedValue val id: Int? = null
)

As @pawelbial has mentioned, this won't work where the TestEntity class "has a" TestEntity class since STUB won't have been initialised when the constructor is run.

I'm a nub myself but seems you have to explicit initializer and fallback to null value like this

@Entity
class Person(val name: String? = null, val age: Int? = null)

These Gradle build lines helped me:
https://plugins.gradle.org/plugin/org.jetbrains.kotlin.plugin.jpa/1.1.50.
At least, it builds in IntelliJ. It's failing on the command line at the moment.

And I have a

class LtreeType : UserType

and

    @Column(name = "path", nullable = false, columnDefinition = "ltree")
    @Type(type = "com.tgt.unitplanning.data.LtreeType")
    var path: String

var path: LtreeType did not work.

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