9

I have the following code in __init__.py

@app.errorhandler(404)
def page_not_found(e):
    return render_template('404.html'), 404

@app.errorhandler(500)
def internal_server_error(e):
    return render_template('500.html'), 500

@app.errorhandler(403)
def page_forbidden(e):
    return render_template('403.html'), 500

It used to catch all 500 errors and show my nice 500.html template. However I moved all my views into separate blueprint files and now the 500 errorhandler does not work. It is only that handler though. 404 works just fine.

If the server throws a 500 error, it will display the default Chrome INTERNAL SERVER ERROR message and not my template. Did I do something wrong when I created all my blueprints that would create this issue?

Here is the entire __init__.py file

import datetime
import mysql.connector
import os
from flask import Flask, render_template, session, request, Blueprint
from flask.ext.moment import Moment
from flask.ext.login import LoginManager
from db_classes import User

from info import info_blueprint
from claims import claims_blueprint
from users import users_blueprint
from members import members_blueprint
from drug import drug_blueprint
from auth import auth_blueprint
from formulary import formulary_blueprint

from config import MYSQL_USR, MYSQL_HOST, MYSQL_PASS, MYSQL_DB, MYSQL_PORT, second_to_live

from decorators import role_required

app = Flask(__name__, template_folder="static/templates")
app.config.from_object('config')

moment = Moment(app)

login_manager = LoginManager()
login_manager.init_app(app)
login_manager.session_protection = 'strong'
login_manager.login_view = 'login'

@login_manager.user_loader
def load_user(user_id):
    return User.query.get(int(user_id))


####################
#   Blueprints
####################

app.register_blueprint(info_blueprint)
app.register_blueprint(claims_blueprint)
app.register_blueprint(users_blueprint)
app.register_blueprint(members_blueprint)
app.register_blueprint(drug_blueprint)
app.register_blueprint(formulary_blueprint)
app.register_blueprint(auth_blueprint)



#####################
#   Error Routes
#####################  


@app.errorhandler(404)
def page_not_found(e):
    return render_template('404.html'), 404

@app.errorhandler(500)
def internal_server_error(e):
    return render_template('500.html'), 500

@app.errorhandler(403)
def page_forbidden(e):
    return render_template('403.html'), 500

#####################
#   Context Processors
#####################

@app.before_request
def make_session_permanent():
    session.permanent = True
    app.permanent_session_lifetime = datetime.timedelta(seconds=second_to_live)

@app.context_processor
def inject_time():
    return dict(current_time=datetime.datetime.utcnow())

if __name__ == "__main__":
    app.run(host= '0.0.0.0', debug=True)
2
  • Is that __init__.py getting imported by your application entry point, preferably when you create your app? Commented Aug 16, 2015 at 20:27
  • it's the file i use to start the application so I suppose so. The create app code is just a few lines above the errorhandlers. Like I said it was working until i moved all my views to a separate file via blueprints. I posted the entire file above.
    – Dan Safee
    Commented Aug 16, 2015 at 20:51

2 Answers 2

32

Something I didn't realize... from the Flask docs

Please note that if you add an error handler for “500 Internal Server Error”, Flask will not trigger it if it’s running in Debug mode.

5
  • 1
    Yes that solved the issue. I had previously been running the app with if __name__ == "__main__": app.run(host= '0.0.0.0', debug=True). When you do this through gunicorn it doesn't use that debug value. When I refactored to use a config file, gunicorn pulled the debug=True from the config file and the 500 template stopped working. Thank you for this information.
    – Dan Safee
    Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 17:19
  • 1
    Link is broken. Please update when you get a chance.
    – code_dredd
    Commented Jul 16, 2019 at 22:00
  • Looks like this is no longer actually the case in Flask 1.1, at least, I can no longer find any references to this behavior. Flask has changed a LOT since the pre 1.0 releases, especially around the CLI and entrypoints. Commented Feb 18, 2020 at 16:34
  • Still experiencing this in 1.1.2.
    – Miriam
    Commented Oct 19, 2020 at 20:14
  • yes, of course!!! I see now, thanks. Commented May 21, 2022 at 9:39
1

For Flask versions 2.3.x, I found the following code that works perfectly fine for me.

from werkzeug.exceptions import HTTPException

@app.errorhandler(Exception)
def handle_exception(e):
    # pass through HTTP errors
    if isinstance(e, HTTPException):
        return e

    # now you're handling non-HTTP exceptions only
    return render_template("errors/500.html", e=e), 500

Check docs here.

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