9

I have a class like this

public class Category 
{
   CategoryID
   List<Product> ProductList
}
public class Product 
{
   CategoryID
}

List<Category> around 15k row and List <Product> around 40k row. I'm doing with LINQ like this

CategoryList.ForEach(i =>
{
    i.ProductList = ProductList.Where(x => x.CategoryID == i.CategoryID).ToList();
});

I want to know there are any implement better performance for this. Data could increase or decrease in other case

2
  • 1
    Have you considered using a database over in memory collections? Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 10:06
  • I did, but it not good at all Commented Aug 18, 2015 at 1:43

7 Answers 7

12

I think it's silly to use parallelism, when a simple change to the algorithm can speed it up thousandfold. Assuming CategoryID has a decent implementation of GetHashCode() a dictionary/lookup has nearly O(1) lookup times compared to the O(n) time of scanning through a list.

Two possible approaches:

Turn categories into a dictionary

Assuming categories have unique IDs you can use:

var categoryById = categories.ToDictionary(c => c.CategoryID);
foreach(var product in products)
{
    var category = categoryById[product.CategoryID];
    category.Products.Add(product);
}

This has runtime O(products.Count + categories.Count) and uses O(categories.Count) memory.

If categories don't start out with an empty list, you might need to create it.

Turn products into a Lookup

var productsByCategory = products.ToLookup(product => product.CategoryID);
foreach(var category in categories)
{
    category.Products = products[category.CategoryID].ToList();
}

This has runtime O(products.Count + categories.Count) and uses O(products.Count) memory.

Since there are typically more products than categories, this approach will require more memory. On the other hand the lookup might remove the need to embed a list of products in the category object.

4
  • And when it go to 40k of categories and 1m2 of products I think this will consume a lot of memory Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 9:54
  • 1
    @user1392853 The first approach will use something like 1-2 MB for 40k categories. That's much smaller than the data you're already keeping in memory. You can use that dictionary whenever you need to lookup a category. Compare this to the other algorithms which are already slow for your current amount of data and will slow down by a factor of 70 when scaling up to the amounts you mentioned in your comment. Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 10:05
  • 1
    Don't forget that Big-O notations only says how the complexity grows with respect to the size (etc) - it doesn't give any indication of the constant factors involved. That's why sometimes even a linear search for keys is faster than a dictionary lookup... This is quote from Jon Skeet's comment about this matter that can be found here : stackoverflow.com/questions/908050/…
    – Fabjan
    Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 10:13
  • 1
    @Fabjan Not sure how that's relevant here. The slightly bigger overhead of a dictionary lookup compared to a list lookup isn't even close to the advantage of not having to scan through 10k+ categories for each product. Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 10:18
5

You can use parallel implementation of LINQ - PLINQ. Usually PLINQ increases the speed of LINQ, because it's using all available cores more efficiently.

CategoryList.AsParallel().ForAll(i =>
     {
         i.ProductList = ProductList.AsParallel.Where(x => x.CategoryID == i.CategoryID).ToList();
     });
4
  • 2
    It's pretty silly to parallelize inefficient code running in O(n*m) when a small change running in O(n+m) would result in a thousandfold improvement in performance. Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 9:20
  • Well, I must admit, ToLookUp is better variant. Dictionary isn't suitable, because ID doesn't unique. Didn't know about this class, thank you for notice. Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 10:03
  • 1
    CategoryID isn't unique among products, but it's probably unique among categories. So you can turn the categories into a dictionary. And of course a Dictionary<TKey, List<TValue>> can function as a lookup (useful if you need a mutable lookup, since .NET only ships with an immutable lookup). Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 10:08
  • PLINQ also has the "downside" of being unordered by default, which might be an issue. There's a few other things that can effect whether or not it's actually faster, although Where can be trivially parallelized. Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 10:56
4

You can also use a GroupJoin instead of multiple where: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb397905.aspx

While Parallel will offer you up to nb core enhancement, you can obtain a linear complexity with GroupJoin.

From @CodesInChaos

If the number of categories and products are on the same scale, you'll get a speedup from quadratic to linear runtime

3
  • "GroupJoin can provide exponential boost." Since the original algorithm has polynomial runtime an exponential speedup is impossible. If the number of categories and products are on the same scale, you'll get a speedup from quadratic to linear runtime. Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 9:40
  • I thought it would be from quadratic to nlog(n)*. How is it linear ?
    – tafia
    Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 9:54
  • Typically we consider a lookup in a hash table as O(1) despite the potential complications. O(log(n)) lookup is typical for ordered/tree-based lookup tables. But the distinction between O(1) and O(log(n)) is rather academic, since logarithms grow so slowly. Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 9:57
3

You may gain performance when organizing the product list grouped per category such as Dictionary<int, List<Product>>. You will then only have to pick the category's product list by its key instead of executing a LINQ query over the whole product list and generating new sub-lists.

CategoryList.ForEach(i =>
{
    i.ProductList = ProductDict[i.CategoryID];
});
2

Actually most efficient solution in such case would be creation of CategoryList from ProductList. Something like this:

CategoryList = ProductList
  .GroupBy(p=>p.CategoryID)
  .Select(
    g=>
      new Category{
        CategoryID=g.Key,
        ProductList = g.ToList()
      }
  );
2
  • there are more than only one property in CategoryList Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 7:43
  • Then you should use GroupJoin. Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 7:56
2

If CategoryList already exists, you can first groupd the products by CategoryID, and then join the grouped products with the categories.

var query =
    from p in ProductList
    group p by p.CategoryID
        into grouped        
    join c in CategoryList
        on grouped.Key equals c.CategoryID
    select new { c, grouped };

Then use a loop to set the ProductList field of the Category objects.

foreach (var item in query)
    item.c.ProductList = item.grouped.ToList();
2

After testing performance i found out that better solution than one i posted before is this :

    static List<Category> FilterList(List<Category> list, List<Product> ProductList)
    {
        Parallel.For(0, list.Count, i =>
        {
            list[i].ProductList = new List<Product>();
            for (int i2 = 0; i2 < ProductList.Count; i2++)
                if (ProductList[i2].CategoryID == list[i].CategoryID) list[i].ProductList.Add(ProductList[i2]);
        });            

        return list;
    }

And then list = FilterList(list, products);

For 3,500,000 operations it took only 200ms

5
  • It's like @Artem answear. Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 7:49
  • @user1392853 my answer uses Parallel.For and not Linq
    – Fabjan
    Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 7:50
  • Thanks for your suggest Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 8:17
  • 1) This still has quadratic runtime. 2) Using a second parallel for is probably slower than using a sequential for. The outer parallel for should already provide all the parallelism you need, with the inner only adding overhead. Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 9:44
  • Your code isn't even thread-safe since you're adding to a List<T> from multiple threads. So the inner Parallel.For incorrect and not just useless/inefficient. Commented Aug 17, 2015 at 9:51

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